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The Hydra - thoughts for a rambling rose

 
pollinator
Posts: 1703
Location: Western Washington
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So I have this massive rambling rose whose main trunk is taller than I am and bigger around than my rather muscular thigh. It branches off at around 7 feet to multiple forearm thick stalks and then into long index finger sized thorny whips. It was a really really gorgeous plant while it was blooming, but alas it was totally taking over the house and had overtaken a 40x40x25 ft area. I cut it back rather severly in late June last year and watch it 'bleed' gallons and gallons of moisture for several weeks before healing up (massive roots!) Sure enough it came surging back and it's placement and size are a problem. Its like having crazy razor wire shooting out in all directions.

I am wondering about cutting out segment of the main truck (the arm and leg size portions) that have a few whips growing out of them and burying the main stem and trellising the whips along the fence line. It would make a lovely and deadly impenetrable fence. Does anyone know how advantageous a rooter a rambling rose is? I know many plants are nearly impossible to kill.
 
Landon Sunrich
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Nothing huh, I guess I'll just have to try it. I have defiantly noticed that most things around here which are cut living and then partially buried so that their new growth is above ground seem to keep growing and re-root and survive.
 
Landon Sunrich
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I swear I had a pic up. Give me a second. : /
 
pollinator
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Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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Roses respond great to willow water! You should be able to propagate it. As far as controlling it? Roses want to be a thicket and they will quickly develop an impassable area - but they may be a pain to try to train in a meaningful way. So of course I would suggest doing it for the thrill and danger of what might happen
 
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Location: North Central New York
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Sounds like what is known in these parts as multiflora. Goats are supposed to love them. I was thinking the same, put it on my borders and it would make a great hedge - just not for goats... :/ I might just try the willow water, too. Thanks!
 
pollinator
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Eric Thompson wrote:Roses respond great to willow water! You should be able to propagate it. As far as controlling it? Roses want to be a thicket and they will quickly develop an impassable area - but they may be a pain to try to train in a meaningful way. So of course I would suggest doing it for the thrill and danger of what might happen



I propagated a bunch of different roses last year just by sticking winter prunings in a pot full of soil and leaving them outside until spring. Most of them rooted. I just used sections of 1 year old stem about 1ft long.
 
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Location: Northen New Mexico, 7500', zone 6b
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Michael Cox wrote:

Eric Thompson wrote:Roses respond great to willow water!  You should be able to propagate it.  As far as controlling it? Roses want to be a thicket and they will quickly develop an impassable area - but they may be a pain to try to train in a meaningful way.  So of course I would suggest doing it for the thrill and danger of what might happen



I propagated a bunch of different roses last year just by sticking winter prunings in a pot full of soil and leaving them outside until spring. Most of them rooted. I just used sections of 1 year old stem about 1ft long.



I would like to do this;  did you moisten the dirt?  

Thanks
Sandy
 
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