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A grain that is easy to grow and easy to process/harvest

 
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Faye Streiff wrote:  Hull less  buckwheat is easy, grows in poorer soil, but have to harvest a few every day because it does not ripen evenly.  I use that to make lasagna noodles with no other flour.  

Would you be willing to share your recipe, method & equipment for making these noodles for us gluten intolerant folk?  Thanks!

 
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Mike Lafay wrote:Wheat will be there for the winter. Honestly I think I'm just going to accept the fact that it takes some work to process. I'll also try a few other winter grains, like barley and rye.



Wheat is easy to harvest, and clean. For an hour's labor, I can feed myself for a week. For a week's labor, I can feed myself for a year. And it's shelf-stable. Western civilization was only possible because people started harvesting wheat by hand.



 
pollinator
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:

Mike Lafay wrote:Wheat will be there for the winter. Honestly I think I'm just going to accept the fact that it takes some work to process. I'll also try a few other winter grains, like barley and rye.



Wheat is easy to harvest, and clean. For an hour's labor, I can feed myself for a week. For a week's labor, I can feed myself for a year. And it's shelf-stable. Western civilization was only possible because people started harvesting wheat by hand.





Do you have some approximate quantity of how much wheat you consume in a week/year ?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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A pound of wheat per day equals 1500 calories per day.
 
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I think this is the video I mentioned or perhaps another with the same speakers. They have lots of good information at the Urban Farm site.
https://urbanfarm.lpages.co/grains-in-your-gardens-aug-24-2022/
 
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I have nixtamalized corn, hard corn, I don’t know the difference between dent or flint so I can’t say what it was…. just home grown multi-colored corn.  I think I was making posole.  I just soaked the kernels in a solution of baking soda and water.  After about a day, the hard seed coat would slip off when rubbed.  Then the seed coats floated away with rinsing and stirring.  Then I cooked it in the soup.

It worked fine, the posole was good 😊

Likely you could make masa….
 
Lexie Smith
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Interesting! I had never heard of that dish but it sounds delicious! How do you preserve it, by drying or freezing perhaps. Also, during the soak, do you ferment it slightly before use or do you soak it in the fridge? I have read about how much better it is to feed your animals fermented foods (as well as eating them ourselves) and experimenting with that in the past, kernels taught me that corn ferments really quickly.    
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Hi Lexie,
Likely I can find my recipe for posole, I think you could dry the nixtamalized corn, then grind and make it into dough, but for all of that, I would need to do a web search, then test what the web says.

Once you make the posole (soup/stew ) you would have to refrigerate it, or after a couple days at room temperature, then bring it to the boil, simmer it awhile to discourage microbial growth… just do what you’re comfortable with.

I am always glad to get even scant instructions on a folk-way type recipe, but I often have to try a set of instructions several times measuring and making careful notes before I feel confident enough to invite my friends….

If you try anything, let me know the results 😊

I just put the bowl of corn on the counter with the soda and water solution.  I never thought about whether it might ferment.  It probably does, why not?
 
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Thekla McDaniels wrote:I think you could dry the nixtamalized corn, then grind and make it into dough,


I boil it in lime solution for an hour, turn off heat and top off the pot with cool water (a bit boils off during the process, but I don't dump off the lime water just yet) and let sit overnight. Next day, after rinsing/rubbing the skins off I grind the cooked, nixtamalized corn to make masa. If it's too much for one use, I'll freeze some of the ground masa for use later.
 
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I grown buckwheat and sunflowers without a problem in TN.   I hope to buy a 2 wheeled tractor $$$$ (over 5k) with flail to tame the last back park of yard.  I like rye...  The golden finches finished off the oil sunflowers I planted.  So maybe try a hybrid sunflower to eat for humans.
 
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