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Thoughts on electric chainsaws?

 
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I'm now running 3 electric chainsaws. The E-go cordless is used for limbing, hedge topping and ladder work.

The corded Greenworks pole saw is used from the ground or a ladder. It lets me drop branches further from myself. It's also very useful on the roof, for trimming anything within reach.

This corded Stihl is the most powerful one. It's good for bulk cutting of firewood and for milling lumber. Some nice slabs were made last week.
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I wasn't sure if I could say, being newish here...

The corded is a WORX 18"
Love it!

When my Stihl finally died and needed a quick replacement, I bought an 18" Poulin.
Let's just say I like it, but it's been around for 9+years, so it's done a good job for me.
 
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Dale Hodgkin's, it's been 5 years since the last time you posted about electric chainsaws in this thread and I'm wondering if the ones you recommended have held up? If not, what have you moved on to?
I need to cut down 100 8 -10 inch diameter eastern red cedar trees. And it's possible I might cut downed trees for firewood, Ash and cottonwood.
 
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I will say that if you're looking for a cheap occasional one, I tried two.  I only cut about 25 times a year, so it's less than many of you.  

The Harbor Freight ones are really cheap but disposable.  THey might last a week or a month. Probablly not more.

I also bought a worx corded one and it has worked great. I bought it because it was so highly rated.  It was $80 or so, but worth 10x the cheap harbor freight one.  You can adjust it, clean it, etc.

My two cents.  

JohN S
PDX OR
 
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Dale isn't here anymore but I'll answer for me.

My primary saw is a battery Stihl. I love it. It's nice to just worry about the chain, battery and lubrication. It's quieter, lighter and smells better. No crank pull to start.

For the larger, harder pieces of wood, it goes go through the battery quick. You'll definitely want a couple. Nice thing about Stihl is you can use the same batteries in all their equipment.

I do have a couple friends that handle the big trees for me though. Partly because it takes a lot longer with mine and partly because I'm new to felling. It's been a learning process. I might get a bit bigger saw someday but still plan to stick with cordless Stihl.

Anyway, good luck with deciding!
 
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Denise, I will respond for myself as well.  I have a 40v Kobalt model which is sorta a cheap model, but I use it frequently and has given me very good service for about 3 years.

Unlike Sonja, my Kobalt is my backup saw but it gets more use than my Stihl gas saw.  It is nice to just be able to pick up the saw and start cutting.  Also, as the chain does not spin as quickly as a gas model, it does not heat up and the chain does not wear nearly as fast as a gas model.  I can hardly believe how long a chain on a battery model lasts compared to a gas model.

Eric
 
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I got a cheap Sunjoe 12" corded chainsaw a few years ago, intending it for occasional trimming around the house. Since building a rocket fired maple syrup evaporator, I have used it more, about a cord's worth of smallish firewood in total. A few weeks ago I was trimming some fresh ash and oak logs for floor beams and the motor burned out. I will get a better one soon - my 16" Stihl does most of the work I have, but the instant starting and stopping is worthwhile for the small trim work.
 
denise ra
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Thanks for your reply about the saws. How did you learn to fell? The trees I need to do are only about 10 to 20 ft and very bushy. Also, what happened to Dale? He left us?
 
Sonja Draven
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I grew up involved with wood cutting but never learned to use a saw. A couple summers ago my older brother showed me the basics. I watched a lot of YouTube videos about what to do and what not to do, especially around safety stuff.

Then I just started cutting. First with little stuff on the ground. Removing branches, cutting small pieces of firewood. Cutting little standing stuff that wouldn't hurt if it feel on me. Then bigger stuff. When my friends cut for me, I watch them and I ask questions. I learn with every experience. I never get cocky.
 
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