• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Jay
  • Anne Miller
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
gardeners:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Daron Williams

Fred's photos from Wheaton Labs  RSS feed

 
steward
Posts: 3037
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
545
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those leaves have mucilage that's really good for your skin. Dry them and then soak them in warmed oil to get a nice healing oil. Mix that with some melted beeswax and you'll have an ointment.
 
gardener
Posts: 469
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
274
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OK, back to our regularly scheduled programming:

Wow! Thanks to the daily-ish bump i got 1000 views in a day!

Evan thought i should post an oil change picture as a good juxtaposition to all the nature photos. This was while my hand was still clean. The filter wouldn't budge. That wrench didn't work. The new gapper Josh gave me his belt to try. It broke. Then i impaled it with a screwdriver. The sidewall was too thin and it just tore a channel. Finally after banging on it with a cold chisel (don't worry, i didn't ruin your wood chisel Paul) for too long, it started to move. At least this time, the DIY oil change was not worth it.

Next is maybe a Black tailed bee fly (Bombylius major) on what looks like Nettleleaf horsemint (agastache urticifolia). The bee fly is an excellent pollinator. The only problem is they tend to fling their eggs into the burrows of solitary bees (and some beetles). When their young hatch, they eat the bee larva, then they eat whatever food was left for them. These guys were all over this mint and they seem to love the daikon blooms as well.

Next is a mystery beetle on a mystery blossom. Any ideas?
IMG_1291.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1291.JPG]
oil change
IMG_6496.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6496.JPG]
Black tailed bee fly (Bombylius major) on Nettleleaf horsemint (agastache urticifolia)
IMG_6423.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6423.JPG]
mysteries
 
gardener
Posts: 323
Location: AB, Canada (Zone 4a - Canadian Badlands)
56
bee chicken forest garden fungi rabbit trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not sure about the plant but the bug might be a longhorn beetle, Clytus ruricola.
 
Posts: 17
Location: Zone 5a
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Regarding IMG_0772.JPG, Claytonia—yes, perfoliata—no. It is Claytonia rubra ssp. ? (either depressa or rubra). I don't remember the distinction. If someone wishes to key it out, a key is online here: http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_IJM.pl?key=8893. Common names are Redstem Miner's Lettuce and Redstem Springbeauty. Photos are available here: http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?where-lifeform=any&rel-taxon=contains&where-taxon=Claytonia+rubra&rel-namesoup=matchphrase&where-namesoup=&rel-location=matchphrase&where-location=&rel-county=eq&where-county=any&rel-state=eq&where-state=any&rel-country=eq&where-country=any&where-collectn=any&rel-photographer=contains&where-photographer=&rel-kwid=equals&where-kwid=&max_rows=24.
 
Fred Tyler
gardener
Posts: 469
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
274
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cam, I'm taking some photos and all videos on my iphone 5. The really close up shots are on my canon 30d with a 100mm macro lens on it. My normal lens (24-105) is off for repairs, but i hope to soon be taking photos with that again. (i guess bouncing around in the woods is hard on this equipment.) The iphone camera has really limited settings and i can't seems to get it to focus on close things i want without changing the exposure. Someday i'll add a wide angle lens to my collection, but right now i don't have an extra $1500 lying around.

Julia, are you talking about the medicinal properties of comfrey, or an earlier post with other leaves?

The first photo is of Common Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris). It is an unusual mint that is not aromatic, but has the typical opposite leaves and square stem of mints. It is said to have many medicinal properties.

The mullein is starting to bloom. When i looked close i noticed some Mullein Seed-Eating Weevil (Gymnetron tetrum). The larvae of these weevils can eat all of the seeds in a particular pod but usually only eat about half of the seeds the plant produces. That's ok, because mullein can produce as many as 175,000 seeds on one plant, and they are viable for up to 100 years.

The last photo is another mystery. Anyone recognize it? It has pretty distinct leaves and the backs of the petals are a little fuzzy.
IMG_1307.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1307.JPG]
Common Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris)
IMG_6522.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6522.JPG]
Mullein with Seed-Eating Weevils (Gymnetron tetrum)
IMG_6533.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6533.JPG]
?
 
Penny Dumelie
gardener
Posts: 323
Location: AB, Canada (Zone 4a - Canadian Badlands)
56
bee chicken forest garden fungi rabbit trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The pretty little growie is a California Bluebell. I had some mysteriously appear in my flower beds as volunteers this year.
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 3037
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
545
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, Comfrey leaves have healing properties.
 
Fred Tyler
gardener
Posts: 469
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
274
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Today's post is all about Wormleaf Stonecrop aka Narrow-leaved Sedum (Sedum stenopetalum). I found this little sedum growing on some pretty rocky road cuts. First i saw the flowers. Then i noticed it had succulent leaves and found a little rosette. Last, i noticed some had gone to seed. I collected a few seed pods. Each pod was a little smaller than a coriander seed and when i opened them they had three brown seeds a little smaller than a sesame seed. After collecting some seed from, i noticed i found a little unidentified beetle had come along for the ride. There are SO many beetles it is always hard to figure out which ones i've found.

The leaves, stem, and flowers of this plant are edible. Apparently the leaves and stem are quite acidic and should only be eaten in small quantities. The flowers are supposed to be a good addition to pickles. I'll have to try it and see what happens.
IMG_6557.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6557.JPG]
Wormleaf Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum) flowers
IMG_6540.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6540.JPG]
Wormleaf Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum) leaves
IMG_6564.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6564.JPG]
Wormleaf Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum) seeds
 
Fred Tyler
gardener
Posts: 469
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
274
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think the Wi-fi is a bit overwhelmed with all the people here for the PDC. It took me a few days to get this post up.

Looking at the side of an old stump, i first thought i found some weird scat in an unusual place. When i looked further, i found it was a fungus or slime mold. Some had cracked open and dark brown spores were pouring out.

Near wofati 0.8 i thought i found a mock orange (Philadelphus lewisii), but it was blooming later than the ones at basecamp. It had bigger flowers with more pointy petals. Maybe it is just a different variety? It sure smells like mock orange.

Every day there are new flowers blooming. Now the sunflowers have started. I think this is just plain old Helianthus annuus, but there are six native sunflowers to Montana and they hybridize readily.
IMG_1316.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1316.JPG]
mock scat
IMG_1319.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1319.JPG]
mock mock orange?
IMG_1326.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1326.JPG]
Common sunflower (Helianthus annuus)
 
It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere - Voltaire. tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!