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Mystery Fruit tree with mystery fruit

 
David Livingston
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HJi guys and gals
I cam across these trees in La Ravardiere
I thought they were large Rowan trees ( to keep away large witches) but now I am not so sure
Here are three pics I took
The first shows some fruit with a walnut for comparisom plus a leaf The inside of the fruit is a bit like a very small apple
The second a mature tree ( bigger than any Rowan I have seen before )
Lastly a young tree ( I think )

So can I eat the fruit ? Do I want to eat the fruit ?
Can chickens or other animals eat the fruit ?

David
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Russell Olson
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Shipova?
Pear x Rowan, rowan has the ability to cross with several other species including pear and aronia
 
Burra Maluca
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I wonder if it's some sort of ornamental quince?
 
David Livingston
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Hi Russel
Thanks for that reply . I see on the net its described as having a tasty fruit . The one I very briefly tried had almost no taste nor are any of the fruits I have seen apricot sized they all appear to be smaller plus the tree is over 15ft more like 30 . But I agree some hybrid of Rowan

David
 
David Livingston
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Hi Burra
Well the leaves are nothing like my quince , not is there any quince like smell

David
 
Stefan James
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I recently found a similar looking fruit that I thinnnnk some sort of pear, looking into the Pyrus genus there are lots of species with wildly different fruit, unfortunately there's not enough foliage left on my tree to really help with the ID. However I don't think your leaves could come from a pear tree (but I'm a total newbie) so the cross idea seems reasonable.

Maybe this is one Anni Kelsey can help with (or maybe I am inappropriately granting her super powers)

I'll circle back to my mystery tree in the spring and see if that solves my question, hopefully yours gets solved as well!
 
David Livingston
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This looks a candidate http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbus_domestica

The looks like it could be it .

David
 
Judith Browning
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I don't know this tree but when I followed your link I was struck that the astringent fruit needs to 'BLET' I learned that word for the first time in reference to persimmons.......I love it..blet, bletting, bletted............

...and the pictures do look exactly like your tree/fruit/leaves.
 
David Livingston
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Also Medlars and Sloes need to Blet I have them both
 
Leila Rich
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How cool. It doesn't appear you'll be eating it, but according to wiki it's a rare and precious tree
David Livingston wrote: Medlars and Sloes need to Blet I have them both

Please, please start a thread if you do something with either;
I'm really interested in old European fruit and the methods around making them edible.
I've never even seen a sloe or medlar 'in the flesh'.
David, your place is a treasure trove!
 
Burra Maluca
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Leila - as far as I'm concerned, sloes are for making sloe gin

My other half used to make jelly from them, and mix them with apple to make jam. He is also the only person I know ever to eat them straight off the bush.
 
Galadriel Freden
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Burra Maluca wrote: eat them straight off the bush.


My four year old eats them from the wild bushes at the local park--ever since he first tried one when he learned to walk. Every year I think he won't like them any more, but so far, he still does!

Actually, they really do have a nice flavor, if you can get past the whole astringency thing
 
David Livingston
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Sloe gin is on the agenda here definitly . Medlar jam once the bush is large enough .
I doubt Blackthorn ( thats the bush that produces Sloes ) would be allowed as its quite invasive .
I will be picking the sloes next week . Then I store them in the freezer for a week. Then I prick them with a fork and half fill a bottle with sloes add an equal weight of sugar top up the bottle with gin . and leave for at least two months , turn the bottle once a week . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_spinosa
Medlars are quite a nice small tree Neflier as its called in France http://www.aujardin.info/plantes/neflier_commun.php has very nice flowers and it is also easy to graft on to hawthorn .

David
 
Leila Rich
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Burra Maluca wrote:Leila - as far as I'm concerned, sloes are for making sloe gin
That's pretty much all I've heard of,
although it sounds like they'd be a great addition to anything plummy or boozy
 
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