• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Large tire container - good or bad?

 
Dan Grubbs
Posts: 501
Location: northwest Missouri, USA
23
books chicken dog forest garden goat trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The construction company that built Interstate 35 in our part of the state decided it would dispose of some giant tires from earth movers and graders into a seasonal stream in the woods at the end of our property. There are 8-10 of these tires, some six feet in diameter. I'm wanting to make the problem a solution and paint them a fun color and turn these into giant planters and I was thinking of using them for some Jerusalem artichokes which might do well in that space and sort of remain contained (sealing off the rim hole on one side, of course). But, I'm wondering if any of you know if using these industrial monsters would be harmful to the plants. Do they leach some toxins? I assume these tires are from the 1970s (when the interstate was built) and have been setting in the woods for decades.

What say you all?
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1268
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've used tires a lot for a lot of different things. Some people hate them because they believe the chemicals leech out. Maybe they do, maybe they don't. Either way they do wonders in my gardens!
strawberry pyramid.jpg
[Thumbnail for strawberry pyramid.jpg]
strawberry pyramid
20140617_193305.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20140617_193305.jpg]
various veggies planted in tires
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1268
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh I almost forgot the sandbox I made. The backside is a windbreak for the kids AND I have plants growing in it.
sandbox.jpg
[Thumbnail for sandbox.jpg]
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1268
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Also, I'd suggest cutting the sidewall off of whichever side you are going to have up. I have used them without doing that but even with some serious dirt pushing it's really hard to get it filled up and stable. I use a linoleum knife to cut the sidewalls off mine.
 
Dan Boone
gardener
Posts: 1752
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
190
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I consider tires too useful not to recycle into my garden systems. Tires aren't so terribly toxic that the tiny amounts of leaching and potential uptake by plants are of concern to me.

Also, after forty or more years your used tires will have leached most of their most volatile nasties. I say, go for it!
 
Sam Barber
Posts: 641
Location: Missoula Mt
40
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I depends. A lot of people have concerns over tires off gassing when they are in contact with UV rays from the sun. Some people are sensitive to chemicals so it may affect them a different way. There are also concerns about soil leeching chemicals from the tires.
A lot of Earthship builders say that tires don't off gas and they don't leech chemicals here is an article about that very thing that includes a study from the University of New Mexico. One thing is for certain tires are a petroleum based product so whether you use them or not is really up to you.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3306
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They also make awesome stock tanks for cattle. You may even be able to sell them for that use. For a lot.

If using them for raised beds, line the bottom with wire mesh so voles and rodents don't dig in. The double galvanized stuff for rabbit cages will last but still let worms come and go.
 
Dan Grubbs
Posts: 501
Location: northwest Missouri, USA
23
books chicken dog forest garden goat trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Awesome input, people.

R Scott, I thought about stock tanks. I've seen many of these at ag shows. I will certainly consider that for one or two of them. I like your idea of a mesh bottom.

Dan Boone, I was thinking the same thing ... these tires have been out in the weather for more than 40 years so I am guessing any off gassing or leaching has largely taken place.

Danielle Venegas, I was going to use a reciprocating saw or angle grinder to make the job of cutting the sidewall off easier. The sidewall on these babies are at least triple the thickness of a car or truck tire. I think a power tool here is a must.

As they are, it will require a good sized tractor just to pull them out of the ground where they've been for 40 years. Yet another fun spring project ahead of me!

Thanks all.
 
Tina Paxton
Posts: 283
Location: coastal southeast North Carolina
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And, a use for the sidewalls after you cut the off (or, at least for the smaller tires, not necessarily the tractor size tires) is as rubber "stops" around young tree saplings to keep lawn mowers and weedeaters from getting too close.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3306
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't take credit for the mesh, learned it here: http://www.rural-revolution.com/search/label/tire%20garden

I need to find the link I had for a freeze proof tank. Basically, they set a culvert or barrel on end on the ground, then the tire as the tank over it. The well tapped into ground heat to keep it thawed. Add a solar powered air bubbler if you need to handle really cold temps.
 
Jennifer Smith
Posts: 714
Location: Zone 5
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My hubby doesn't want any, doesn't want to look at them. I think to bury partway along with some of that fancy spray paint that looks like stone might fix the astheit
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!