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bamboo for "log culture"?

 
dan long
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I can't find any info on google as to what kind of mushrooms will grow on bamboo shafts (not chips or sawdust) so I'm assuming nobody does this?

I'm sure reishi will grow on bamboo since I have found it growing wildly on decaying bamboo rhizomes, but reishi is a secondary decomposer (right?)

Spliting bamboo open, putting a spoonful of spawn between each joint and zip tying it back together would be much less labor intensive than traditional log culture (and the material is much more available in Taiwan) but I can't find anyone else doing this.

I'm all for learning from experience, but i would rather use someone else's experience than start from square one myself. Anyone have any insight into using bamboo shafts for "log culture"?

I thought just as i was reading this that since there would be no drilling and filling (just splitting and knitting) this might be a great way to employ exhausted substrate, filling the hollow reeds with whats left over or even filling them up with exhausted bamboo shafts from the previous batch.
 
John Saltveit
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I agree that it makes sense, because bamboo is the fastest growing plant, as far as I know. However, I don't know which one. I would think oysters or turkey tails would grow on them.
John S
PDX OR
 
Scott Stiller
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Location: North Carolina zone 7
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I would love to hear how this works. I have only inoculated the traditional way but I have a large amount of bamboo at my disposal. Please keep us updated.
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Bamboo is in the grass family just like wheat, rye, oats, etc. Something like oyster mushroom would probably be fine decomposing it. Maybe even wine cap too.
 
lucy osinski
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Looking for an answer to the same question... has anyone tried this out yet?
 
John Saltveit
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Dead bamboo is hollow and as such, I would think that the wood would dry out too much. What I would try is bamboo chips in a bucket. That is, if I had bamboo.
John S
PDX OR
 
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