• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Jay
  • Anne Miller
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
gardeners:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Daron Williams

Paulownia Plantation  RSS feed

 
Posts: 116
19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Has anybody here got any experience with Permaculture style tree plantations specifically Paulownia ,i have  been searching the web for days now and can only find lots of positive things mainly from the suppliers of plants and seeds ,any info would be helpful.

many tx

Paul

Permaship Team   

http://sites.google.com/site/permaship1/
 
steward
Posts: 3420
Location: woodland, washington
95
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can tell you that paulownia is easy to grow and it can be coppiced and it grows quickly.  I've heard it called "instant shade".  I believe the flowers are useful to a number of insects.  I can also tell you that the wood is soft.  I'm told that, being soft and easily worked, it's good for some sorts of woodworking, but I'm not at all familiar with that.

where I'm at, there are outfits catering to specialty woodworkers that could probably provide some information on local demand and price, but I don't know what the situation is in Bulgaria (you're in Bulgaria, yes?).

personally, a plantation of paulownia doesn't sound terribly exciting to me.  it's a nice enough tree and useful, but not tasty enough to justify more than a couple of specimens.  if, however, you're excited about the things paulownia is good for or you know folks who are, it might be just the tree to plant quite a few of.
 
                                
Posts: 148
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Because of the growth rate and high seed production, some states in the US have listed it as a noxious weed.
 
Posts: 555
Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just checked the Plants for a future website and it has more info.It has only fared OK for me here in the PacificNW but that is also because I havnt given it full sun because it has less uses as food or medicine.I have read of it being real invasive in kentucky area but not so here.That would be similar to mulberries,tea,persimons,che,and a whole host of other plants from warm humid areas that struggle here.I have met wood carvers that love it for its ability to carve but fast growing often means less strong or rot resistant so ...
 
Paul Alfrey
Posts: 116
19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tx for the replies.

I have a done more research since my first post and have a better idea of what information i am looking for.
We are thinking of the non-invasive type Paulownia elongata which is also fastest growing. The plan is to use the timber from the trees for firewood and building materials  when the trees are ready in 10 years or so. In the mean time we want to make the most of the space between the trees and experiment a little with guilds and stacked functions. The trees are nitrogen fixing , huge biomass producers, heavy and sustained  bloomers and heavy deciduous shaders.  If anyone has any experience with plants that grow well below these tree's in all seasons  would be much appreciated.

 
Cheers

Paul

http://sites.google.com/site/permaship1/Home
Permaship Team
 
Posts: 29
Location: Missouri Ozarks
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I set out a row of these trees with prospects of planting about 30 acres of them.  I was in south AL on sandy soil and they did well.  I planted them early one summer and in September, hurricane Ivan came through and leaned them all over.  I cut them off at ground level and the next summer, they took off.  I love the trees.  But, they suckered terribly from the roots.  I don't know if it was the shallow sands on top of yellow clay, or the high water table.  But the one row became very wide with suckers.  The wood is good for firewood, and that was my main interest.  It burns fast and hot, but the tree is ready to cut again in about 4 years.  Goats will kill them by girdling them.  And they do love the leaves.  Cattle will scrape on the bark and eat a few leaves.  But nothing like the goats.  But, as fast as the tree grows, it is impressive.
 
                                  
Posts: 40
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just let my sheep kill the Paulownia kawakamii I've been growing the last couple of years here in deep South Texas. It grew fine in the early spring and late fall, but summer heat appeared too much for it. Dropped its leaves and refused to grow an inch.  Be skeptical of the claims that Paulownias can take "120 F" heat. Mine seemed to have been defeated by consistent 95F weather.
 
Posts: 96
Location: West Virginia/ Dominican Republic
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It grows great guns as a pioneer in WV. Not really a pest though. Grows fast but the hardwoods will win out over time.
 
Posts: 158
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Why not use a REAL permaculture tree?
I don't know where you are located, but if you are anywhere that gets a decent rain fall and the earth does not freeze, you need to look at MORINGA trees!
Yes, ALL parts of it can be used! It groes about 14 feet the first year and can be topped. You can eat the leaves raw or steamed, It has delicious fruit, ( hint sell leaves and fruit) the bark can be used in skin care, the roots in tea, and naturally, the tree as a tree shade.  Grow CHIA ( yes, like the "chia pet") underneath the trees. Chia  is a great anti oxident as well as helps lower blood pressure ( naturally you cant say that part though!  )  Great comination!. I have fallen in love with the Moringa tree and hope to grwo some whenever I move ( soon).
 
These are the worst of times and these are the best of times. And this is the best tiny ad:
2019 PDC for Scientists, Engineers, Educators and experienced Permies
https://permies.com/wiki/100059/PDC-Scientists-Engineers-Educators-experienced
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!