• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Fred's photos from Wheaton Labs

 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I arrived at wheaton labs with some perennial plants thinned from my garden in Minnesota. These are plants that with no care would spread to take over the whole urban lot. I figured that made them good candidates for the fledgling food systems here at the lab, where there's a bit more space for them to expand.
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
Black raspberries
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
Egyptian walking onions
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
Day lilies
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One more photo, which I guess is garlic chives, but we always called onion grass. I also gave almost as much as is in all these photos to Evan for his ant plot. Not pictured were some comfrey, horse radish, and oregano.
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
Garlic chives
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lots of mulching hugle berms today, and i saw a few things:
IMG_0607.3.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_0607.3.jpg]
something in Calochortus genus
IMG_0613.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0613.JPG]
beneficial predator: snakefly
IMG_0653.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0653.JPG]
four future robbins
 
Julia Winter
steward
Pie
Posts: 1685
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
121
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That snakefly is really cool - never seen one of those before.
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jocelyn was just telling me about salsify and then i found a good example of it in bloom. Found a growie with very hairy leaves, felt a little sticky, and a yellow and purple veined flower. I couldn't track down an ID on that one. The highlight of the day was when Evan and i were helping Michael work on the RMH in the teepee. We heard the buzz of tens of thousands of bees. The skiddable bee hut is near the teepee, so i figure the colony there was splitting. I followed them about 800 ft where they rested on the branch of a dead tree while their scouts went looking for a new home. At first they were very noisy, but soon quieted down. I'm trying to get the video sorted out so i can post that too.
IMG_0654.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0654.JPG]
Salsify
IMG_6019.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6019.JPG]
mystery plant
IMG_6059.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6059.JPG]
swarm waiting for scouts
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In the spirit of "some video is better than no video", here is a video with some clips from the bee swarm. At first they are flying everywhere, then they are calmed down into a clump while they wait for the scouts. Sorry for the bad orientation of the video. I tried to adjust it in editing. Next time will be better.

 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is some Lupine hard at work fixing nitrogen in the middle of a little used road at the lab. Then there is a crazy fungus that Evan showed me bursting out of one of the trees on his plot. I later found it is the pine-oak gall rust. It is a fungal disease caused by Cronartium quercuum, and requires both a pine and oak host to complete it's life cycle. I haven't seen any oaks around here, though. On such a young tree it will likely cause death, though older trees can survive with a little disfiguring. After visiting with Evan i found a bunch of orchids across the street from ant village. The Mountain Lady's Slipper (Cronartium quercuum).
IMG_0682.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0682.JPG]
Lupine
IMG_0706.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0706.JPG]
pine-oak gall rust - Cronartium quercuum
IMG_6090.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6090.JPG]
Mountain Lady's-slipper - Cypripedium montanum
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We've been getting a bit of rain here at the lab, so now we have lots of mushrooms! The first one is an edible puffball, but I don't know the others. I need to get an ID book for Montana mushrooms.
IMG_0700.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0700.JPG]
IMG_0719.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0719.JPG]
IMG_6110.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6110.JPG]
 
Beverly Temmer
Posts: 36
Location: Mukilteo, Washington
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://www.montanamushrooms.com/ is a site you might want to look at for your mushrooming.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Pie
Posts: 19843
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fred,

It is quite possible that if you put a plant/mushroom ID book requests on the gapper love thread, they will show up.
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the link Beverly, and thanks for the idea Paul. It would be nice to have something up on the Lab where my internet doesn't really work.

I found a hornet's nest under the eaves of one of the sheds here. They are beneficial predators and since the nest is not near a doorway, it isn't a problem.

I saw a big black beetle. I guess even the experts have a hard time distinguishing species, so i'll just leave it at Genus Coelocnemis.

The comfrey is just starting to bloom.

With all the rain everything is growing and it is exciting to watch.
IMG_0649.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0649.JPG]
Hornet nest
IMG_0722.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0722.JPG]
Genus Coelocnemis
IMG_0727.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0727.JPG]
Comfrey
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There's been some mice in wofati 0.7, so i made a non-lethal version of a mouse trap Paul suggested (no water for drowning). I caught three mice on the first night. They are now far from any of our structures and will hopefully make a new home somewhere else.

As i stated previously, we've been getting a bit of rain. Even the sand is molding!

Throughout the day i saw a few Western Sculptured Pine Borers (Chalcophora angulicollis). Of course, when i got my camera the only one i could find wasn't all that sculptured. But it did have a nice coppery iridescence on its legs. The females are attracted to a chemical release by injured and stressed pine (and fir) trees. They then release a pheromone that attracts the males. The first ones to attack a tree are stopped by pitch, but they have released pheromones to attract greater numbers of both sexes and attack as a group. After mating they stop releasing attractants so their offspring will have less competition. Their larva burrow under the bark for two years before maturing to adults, leaving a pattern on the wood that many have seen.
IMG_0735.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0735.JPG]
Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)
IMG_0740.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0740.JPG]
white slime mold
IMG_6138.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6138.JPG]
Western Sculptured Pine Borer (Chalcophora angulicollis)
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Found some prairie smoke growing near the tipi. Apparently some Plateau Indian tribes used it to treat tuberculosis. Hopefully i won't need to test that.

Peas have started blooming on the sun-scoop berm around the tipi!

While we were having dinner in the Wofati 0.7 i found an ichneumon wasp on the window. She was several inches long. She looks like she has a massive stinger, but she has a long ovipositor that she uses to drill into a tree and lay her eggs in larvae that are eating the cambium of the tree. Parasitizing the parasites. I'm guessing she is a Megarhyssa nortoni wasp. Apparently the adults of the species don't eat.
IMG_0754.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0754.JPG]
Prairie smoke (Geum triflorum)
IMG_6156.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6156.JPG]
Pea flower
IMG_6146.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6146.JPG]
Ichneumon wasp (Megarhyssa nortoni)
 
Rebecca Norman
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1032
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
89
food preservation greening the desert solar trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Beautiful photographs! Keep providing more, please!

I think your mystery plant is henbane (Hyosycamus), which is toxic.
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, Rebecca, i believe you are right! That looks like Hyoscyamus niger to me. I had wondered if it was a nightshade. Seed pods have started forming since i took that photo and they look like the ones in that article. I don't think i'll be adding that to any potions. Thanks!

Today i have a spider i spotted as i stooped to plant a seed next to some sunchokes. That spider was hanging out on last years stalk. During lunch i found two more ichneumon wasps. It must be the season to lay your eggs in a tree boring parasite. When i took the last photo she was cleaning herself. It looked almost like yoga at times as she passed her legs over all of her body and wings. I didn't have luck finding out any of the species today. Maybe i need a bug book too? Either way, it's nice to see all the diversity here at the Labs.

IMG_6197.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6197.JPG]
Spidey
IMG_6229.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6229.JPG]
ichneumon wasp
IMG_6240.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6240.JPG]
ichneumon wasp
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One final (maybe) picture of some ichneumon wasps. It is an action shot of the Megarhyssa nortoni. At first i thought they might be mating, but when i looked closer, i could see that they were both drilling their ovipositors into the dead tree at different angles. There must have been a good batch of larvae in there and they both wanted that spot.

The second photo is some short lived mushrooms that are probably Parasola plicatilis. They work hard breaking down dead plant matter in the soil. When it rains they show up the next day and don't stay long. They melt and their inky spores are spread.

The last photo is of a bunchberry (Cornus canadensis). The leaves and flowers might remind you of dogwood, and that's because they're related and are in the same genus. They like to grow in a moist area near a rotten log or stump. Maybe with all the hugles going in, we'll be seeing a lot more of these. I'll try and get another photo when the edible berries show up, and i just might stick some of their seeds into a hugle and see how they do. Bunchberries have one of the fastest known plant actions. When a pollinator shows up and moves the petals about, a springy filament is released. This throws the pollen incredibly fast and the pollen grain experiences two or three thousand times the force of gravity.
IMG_6308.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6308.JPG]
drilling wasps (Megarhyssa nortoni)
IMG_0759.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0759.JPG]
Parasola plicatilis?
IMG_0770.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0770.JPG]
Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
 
nancy sutton
gardener
Posts: 596
Location: Federal Way, WA - Western Washington (Zone 8 - temperate maritime)
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Beautiful, Fred. Thanks a bunch! :)
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Rebecca and Nancy. I'm glad you're enjoying the photos. I've enjoyed my time here taking them.

First i made a video of some workers on the lab taking out a stump.



I wanted a little sauerkraut, so i chopped up some cabbage and started it fermenting. I used the recipe from Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz.

I found what looks like California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). Wikipedia says they don't overwinter in cold climates. But this one has such lush growth, i think it must have had some roots in the ground to get an early start. Don't know if an earlier gapper planted these, because we are outside of it usual range, but i've seen several around the Lab.

Lastly, some foothill death camas (Toxicoscordion paniculatum). Reportedly, livestock generally avoid this plant as it is unpalatable. Sounds like they might use it occasionally to self medicate, like sepp holzer suggests. So this can be one of many poisonous plants in the paddocks here. Native peoples used it externally to treat bruises, sprains, and boils. I guess most bees (except some specialists) avoid it because of the toxicity of the pollen.
IMG_0910.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0910.JPG]
making sauerkraut
IMG_0918.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0918.JPG]
California poppy (Eschscholzia californica)
IMG_6095.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6095.JPG]
Foothill death camas (Toxicoscordion paniculatum)
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The first picture looks kind of like kingdevil hawkweed, but i'm leaning towards two-flowered dwarf-dandelion (Krigia biflora). I didn't take a picture of the leaves, so i can't be sure.

I was seeding some of the hillside above basecamp and i found a large mound from thatching ants. I didn't get close enough to see if it was the Western thatching ant (Formica obscuripes) or the less common Formica montana which only occasionally thatches (a close approach often results in painful regret, as they will fiercely defend their nest). The raised mound allows the ants to collect solar energy and warm the mound during colder months. The large amount of organic matter helps them maintain temperature and humidity. These ants (especially their larvae) are a favorite food of bears and pileated wood peckers. Besides a bite these ants also spray formic acid at attackers. This painful combination is enough to drive away a bear after a short while. These ants will scavenge dead insects but are also know for farming aphids for honeydew. Around mid-June the new queens and drones will emerge from the nest (both with wings) by the thousands. They will fly away to mate (after which the males die) and form new colonies.

Last is the Large-flowered collomia (Collomia grandiflora). This plant is in the phlox family. It has blue pollen, which explains the blue bees i saw returning to the hive at the teepee.
IMG_6109.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6109.JPG]
probably two-flowered dwarf-dandelion (Krigia biflora)
IMG_0932.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0932.JPG]
Thatching ant mound
IMG_0934.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0934.JPG]
Large-flowered collomia (Collomia grandiflora)
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
First is an unidentified beetle.

Next is a cicada exoskeleton. I saw several holes in the ground and several exoskeletons attached to grass and shrubs.

Ernie and Erica Wisner are visiting Wheaton Labs (along with Francesco from Italy). Today Ernie worked on a 4" J-tube with a cast core that he hopes to perfect for heat and hot water systems for boats and tiny houses. It overloaded the IR thermometer that Francesco had (maxed out at 1300 Celsius), so we don't know how hot it got.
IMG_6322.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6322.JPG]
beetle
IMG_6387.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6387.JPG]
Cicada
IMG_1063.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1063.JPG]
4" J-tube
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry to interrupt...

Next there is a nest of cute baby deer mice.

Last is Golden Clover (Trifolium aureum). It is a biennial nitrogen fixer.
IMG_6204.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6204.JPG]
um, you know...it's that time of year
IMG_1048.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1048.JPG]
Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)
IMG_6347.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6347.JPG]
Golden Clover (Trifolium aureum)
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some of my planting efforts are finally starting to make themselves know. Now i just wish it would rain again (sorry Evan). Here are a corn and squash seedling.

Even though it's been a while since in rained, i'm still finding mushrooms. Here is a nice grouping of some polypore mushrooms growing with some moss.



IMG_1076.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1076.JPG]
corn
IMG_1098.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1098.JPG]
squash
IMG_1096.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1096.JPG]
mushrooms
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A Lorquin's Admiral (Limenitis lorquini) butterfly found it's way into wofati 0.7 and stayed on the kitchen window a while until i moved it outside. Wikipedia claims these butterflies are territorial and attack trespassers (including large birds), but i can't see how a butterfly attacks anything.

Assassin bugs are normally beneficial insects, but this one caught a native bee that came to this oxeye daisy.

I found a bunch of blooming blanket flowers (Gaillardia aristata) today. It is a perennial and it was growing in a pretty dry area. Some Plateau Indian tribes used it to treat fevers and wounds.
IMG_6398.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6398.JPG]
Lorquin
IMG_1091.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1091.JPG]
Assassin bug on oxeye daisy
IMG_1273.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1273.JPG]
Blanket flowers (Gaillardia aristata)
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 216
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
19
bike books dog food preservation greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fred Tyler wrote:Jocelyn was just telling me about salsify and then i found a good example of it in bloom. Found a growie with very hairy leaves, felt a little sticky, and a yellow and purple veined flower. I couldn't track down an ID on that one.


Thanks, now I know what one of my mystery plants is!
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't had any luck figuring out what this first plant is any ideas?

Found some Showy Fleabane (Erigeron speciosus) blooming near wofati 0.8 when i was giving a tour to some of the many people arriving for the PDC. The dried plants are believed to repel fleas.

The snowberry clearwing (Hemaris diffinis) is a moth that flies around (mostly by day) to drink nectar like a bumblebee or humming bird. This unfortunate fellow was found on my window sill.


IMG_0772.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0772.JPG]
?
IMG_1285.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1285.JPG]
Showy Fleabane (Erigeron speciosus)
IMG_6405.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_6405.JPG]
Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis)
 
Patrick Mann
Posts: 302
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fred Tyler wrote:I haven't had any luck figuring out what this first plant is any ideas?


Miner's lettuce maybe?
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1106
Location: northern northern california
62
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
that first picture, plant ID is Claytonia Perfoliata - aka Miner's Lettuce. it does look quite different though, than the ones i find, perhaps because of the local conditions. but the flowers make it clear thats what it is.

btw, awesome photography =) you definitely have a good sense of framing the images, and some talent there =)
 
evan l pierce
Lab Ant
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 698
Location: ava, ant village
572
chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur hunting solar wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh! Showy fleabane! Maybe I should have looked at your thread before I posted about how mysterious that flower was. Nice id work, Fred!
 
Lee Kochel
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Re Fred's photo captions. It is hard to tell exactly, but I am 99% sure that your approximately 20th picture, labeled comfrey, IMG_0727.JPG. is not comfrey but the herb borage.
 
Cam Mitchell
Posts: 108
Location: W. CO, 6A
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lee Kochel wrote:Re Fred's photo captions. It is hard to tell exactly, but I am 99% sure that your approximately 20th picture, labeled comfrey, IMG_0727.JPG. is not comfrey but the herb borage.

Hmm, the borage I grew years ago had very blue flowers. These look purpley to me.
What characteristics make you think it's borage?
 
Cam Mitchell
Posts: 108
Location: W. CO, 6A
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
By the way Fred, as others have expressed, great pics!
I try to take pics of plants and wildlife, but apparently I'm not that good at photography. They always come out blurry. Oh well, ONE thing I'm not good at.
I use my smartphone. What is your setup? How do you take those detailed close-ups?
 
Lee Kochel
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cam: my reason is based on the fact that I have 1 sq yd of it growing right off my patio. The color and shape of the flowers, the orientation of the flowers on the stalk to the rest of the plant, the veining and shape of the leaves and the arrangement of the leaves relative to each other all perfectly mimic what is growing off my patio and which is not comfrey.
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Pie
Posts: 8808
Location: Portugal Zone 9 Mediterranean Climate
610
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's a video Paul made about comfrey. Maybe it will help us determine which it really is until we have a definitive answer.

 
Penny Dumelie
gardener
Posts: 201
Location: AB, Canada (Zone 4a - Canadian Badlands)
14
bee chicken food preservation forest garden fungi goat hugelkultur rabbit trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Borage has more bristles than comfrey.
Borage flowers are star shaped once they open up; comfrey retains the bell shape.

There is a good post at this link with pictures showing the difference.
 
Julia Winter
steward
Pie
Posts: 1685
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
121
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Yes! Thanks for that link to a picture of borage. I used the "Img" button (in the reply box, there's a whole line of useful buttons near the top) to add it here. It has fuzzy leaves like comfrey, but it's an annual. You can eat the blue flowers, they taste like cucumber to me.

Comfrey has purple flowers, in my experience.
 
Lee Kochel
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I stand corrected. Thanks.
 
Sarah Bedwell
Posts: 5
Location: East Sussex, United Kingdom (Zone 8)
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Really loving the pictures, Fred.

This is my first post and I don't know how to reference your earlier mystery plant but I agree with Leila that it's Claytonia. We call it Winter Purslane here in the UK. Our plant look exactly like your one and we over winter it here (Zone *) as a winter salad plant - lots of Vitamin C but a bit bland.
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 1925
59
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Fred. Erigeron is such a nice plant. Our local one here is called Beach daisy. Probably not the same one as yours, seeing as you're a long way, a lot of hardiness and a lot of altitude away from the beach. Please dont' eat the death camas. Comfrey is so much taller than borage that I never confuse them. Also, as was said, sky blue versus purple flowers.
John S
PDX OR
 
Fred Tyler
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 302
Location: St Paul, MN/Tularosa, NM and now a gapper at Wheaton Labs
231
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks everyone for your ID help (and compliments)! What an amazing resource this community of knowledgeable people is! Just to be sure if that old photo was comfrey or borage, i've taken three more pictures of the exact same plant. It is planted in one of the hugle berms at basecamp. It was identified to me as comfrey and it looks like the plant we had in MN that my friend called comfrey. Hope this makes it clear one way or the other.

IMG_1308.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1308.JPG]
full plant
IMG_1309.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1309.JPG]
expanding flower cluster
IMG_1310.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1310.JPG]
leaf attachment
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Pie
Posts: 3202
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
151
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yup, comfrey!
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic