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How do I get better figs?

 
Posts: 21
Location: San Francisco area, USDA zone 9
1
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My fig tree produces from June until November. The early summer figs are watery and start rotting the second they reach full ripeness. The late fall figs are sweet, better color, better in every way.

Is this a known phenomenon? Is there anything to do to make it better? I'm thinking of picking most of the baby figs in the spring and throwing them away to see if that will help.

I don't know the variety of fig, but they are giant and green outside, light pink inside. The tree throws off hundreds of figs each season. There is way more insect pressure in the early summer than the fall. Fall is still hot here, but with occasional cold days and nights.
 
gardener
Posts: 1029
Location: Northern Italy
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The same thing happens to my figs here.

My logic is this (i have no idea if I'm right):
Figs originate in the middle east and western asia. What are the chances that in those areas they go through two cycles of fruiting?

Where you are and where I am, the warm weather doesn't last long enough for the two cycles to bear good fruit, so the first cycle is lame.

William
 
Posts: 79
Location: Leicester, UK 8b,
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forest garden trees bee
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In cooler climates it is advised to removed the young fruits at the end of autumn as they will not survive the winter. But does anyone have any idea on the sort of temperatures they might survive? I feel there is probably a climate range where if I do leave this years young fruit on AND they flourish in the spring it may exhaust the tree for a summer crop next year anyway. But it is heavily laden now and next year might have a cool summer!

If you have fruits surviving the winter, what sort of minimum temps do you get please?

Thanks

This also links in with 'what to do with unripe figs' thread in cooking but sorry I'm not sure how to do that.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
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There are many many different types of figs hundreds . Some have two crops a year others one. Depending on the climate .
Figs have a unique form of fruit in that it's a modified stem rather than a flower.
I try to steal ....... or borrow types l find growing well in my area  it's so easy to propagate

david
 
cesca beamish
Posts: 79
Location: Leicester, UK 8b,
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forest garden trees bee
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Thanks, I didn't realise there were quite that many varieties of fig. Mine is a 'Brown Turkey', the hardy variety recommended for the UK. We've had a few -4C nights and the 1" 'fruits' appear unaffected.
 
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