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please help recognizing these plants  RSS feed

 
Ronaldo Montoya
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I found these plants in my land. Can anybody please help me to recognize them?












 
Miles Flansburg
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Hello Ronaldo, can you tell us where your land is?
 
Brett Hammond
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It is hard to tell from your photos, but the top one looks like rose of sharon, and the bottom one is some type of sage.

Good luck!
 
Ken W Wilson
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The one with fluffy blooms could be chickory. What color were the blooms?
 
Roberto pokachinni
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It's difficult to say for certain, but I think that the second to last one is Oyster Plant, also known as Salsify and scientifically : Tragopogon porrifolius. It commonly has purplish flowers which turn into a dandelion like seed head (but often somewhat larger). The flowers of some varieties can be yellow or white. It is considered a noxious weed, although the root is a delicacy.
 
Ronaldo Montoya
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Miles Flansburg wrote:Hello Ronaldo, can you tell us where your land is?


My land is located in peru/southern hemisphere in a arid tropical environment at 700 meters over the sea level.
 
patrick canidae
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second photo has what looks like stinging nettle seed heads, and some nettle leaves of younger vegetative plants in the bottom of the photo, if that is the plant group you are concerned with in that photo

third plant appears to be western salsify; dig up roots and post a pick and that would help quite a bit

last photo looks like a nice stand of bloomed out alfalfa(Lucerne)
 
Lotetta McCartney
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Two looks like pig weed, and then feverfew.
 
Ronaldo Montoya
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patrick canidae wrote:second photo has what looks like stinging nettle seed heads, and some nettle leaves of younger vegetative plants in the bottom of the photo, if that is the plant group you are concerned with in that photo

third plant appears to be western salsify; dig up roots and post a pick and that would help quite a bit

last photo looks like a nice stand of bloomed out alfalfa(Lucerne)



Yesterday i went to my land at night but it was very hard to me to find the plant that looks as western salsify ( the one i took the picture) because my land is like a chaotic jungle of plants , i found another similar and i dig it to take pics to the root, i also cut a piece of the plant that looks alfalfa to take a better picture , here are the pictures.










 
Ronaldo Montoya
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patrick canidae wrote:second photo has what looks like stinging nettle seed heads, and some nettle leaves of younger vegetative plants in the bottom of the photo, if that is the plant group you are concerned with in that photo

third plant appears to be western salsify; dig up roots and post a pick and that would help quite a bit

last photo looks like a nice stand of bloomed out alfalfa(Lucerne)



sorry , but the last pics i posted were not of the same of the plant in third picture ( the one that looks as western salsify).
Here is a picture of the same plant.

Is it western salsify?

 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
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Hi Renoldo,

That looks like a pretty small plant for salsify, from my experience.

The other one really does look like a bloomed out alfalfa. The three leaves together in that pattern, and the shape of the flower, in general, but it's not close enough up to tell for sure. Are you familiar with pea flowers. An alfalfa flower is like a cluster of tiny pea flowers, but is purplish where as pea flowers are generally white.
 
patrick canidae
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The alfalfa is alfalfa.

The salsify like plant is a very small specimen. If it were larger it would be easier to identify by the usually large tap root. Your plant does have a taproot, albeit crooked as a dogs hind leg and is small enough to make ID difficult.

What are your primary concern with these plants? Are you going to eat them yourself, graze them with livestock, or just trying to get a handle on your native flora?

Happy New Year!
 
Dave DeNard
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The second one is most deff a type of amaranth or "ancient grain". Lambs quarter perhaps or known as the name stated above, pig weed. I have those in michigan. Spread those babies and you can make bread and what not with it.

Is your farm near other permies? Im in south america right now trying to find land to homestead. Is it just you or are there other like minded folk
 
Ronaldo Montoya
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patrick canidae wrote:The alfalfa is alfalfa.

The salsify like plant is a very small specimen. If it were larger it would be easier to identify by the usually large tap root. Your plant does have a taproot, albeit crooked as a dogs hind leg and is small enough to make ID difficult.

What are your primary concern with these plants? Are you going to eat them yourself, graze them with livestock, or just trying to get a handle on your native flora?

Happy New Year!


Yes im eating them. In my land i just let everything to grow and i discovered that a lot of plants are edible and i like to discover new edible plants in my land.
 
Ronaldo Montoya
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Dave DeNard wrote:The second one is most deff a type of amaranth or "ancient grain". Lambs quarter perhaps or known as the name stated above, pig weed. I have those in michigan. Spread those babies and you can make bread and what not with it.

Is your farm near other permies? Im in south america right now trying to find land to homestead. Is it just you or are there other like minded folk


I think i discovered the name of the second one, i think its called "amaranthus quitensis" , it says that the leaves are edible but im not quite sure that the seeds are edible too.

amaranthus quitensis


Near my farm at 20 minutes by car theres an ecovillage called "tierra langla" .
In my land im working alone , the idea is to create a system to be sustainable and become disconnected from the system. In one month im gonna start to build a superabobe house.
Here the land is very cheap and it has all the characteristics to make permaculture proyects(sun all year, plenty of water, wind ,fertile soil... its next to a river ) I think my place is a good place and is not well known yet.
If you want to come , you can stay for free (or whatever permie), but you take care of my bees and my plants. Im usually travelling and need somebody to stay.
I think this place is perfect to make an ecovillage.

cheers.


 
Dave DeNard
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Excellent! Ill PM you. Id like to visit.
 
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