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hot dogs around the world  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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I'm glad it's dinnertime, I just about started drooling.

If that isn't enough options for anyone, Japadog has some more! http://www.japadog.com/menu_En.html
 
gardener
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Mmmm I don't do meat, but a grilled dog with some of it going carbon skin, tossed on a buttered grilled bun, then a layer of grated cheese, American; then some of my hearty beanless chili slathered over it and more grated cheese. MMMMMM That chart is enough to make me die of starvation.
 
pollinator
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In Iceland, the hotdogs are made from sheep.  I didn't like them as well as beef, but they weren't bad.
 
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Here in CT, we have some local places that make pretty good hot dogs. ( the things you purchase in a plastic bag, are not hot dogs lol) the down side of really good hotdogs is the rival a decent steak in price per pound.
Still, grilled, perhaps stuffed with cheese. Topped with yesterday's homemade chili and a sprinkle of sautéed onions?, washed down with beer?.... Is a meal fit for any king.   Larry
 
gardener
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I think the difference between hotdogs and sausage, is mostly that hot dogs sometimes contain lungs and other floor sweepings.

The Boers of South Africa, make an excellent sausage, called Boerewors.  It always contains beef but also can have pork, lamb or wild meats.

It originated with Dutch farmers, but has become popular with people all over southern Africa. We have a population of expats here, and they sell these at the Farmers Market.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boerewors
 
Posts: 1554
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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A really good hot dog is tasty, just grilled, with mustard.

The hotdogs on a Coney are usually boiled,bland and mushy,even at the places that cook them on a griddle tend to cook them lightly.
I prefer a mett, or at least a hotdog cooked till it has a crisp skin.

Ironically, even though Cincinnati is Chilli Cheese Coney ground zero, my  favorite chain is Dixie Chilli, across the river in Northern Kentucky.

Of course by chilli I mean Greek style spaghetti sauce.
Cause that's how we roll in the Queen City.
 
Deb Rebel
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Years back in a small small apartment that had a two burner gas stove (aka worn out too so you mostly got ON or OFF as the amount of burner) and lazy and broke. Take out the hot dog buns and open the pack of cheap el-doggos. Take the grate off the burner that usually holds the pot. Take the weird three tined fork you got a bazillion years ago and stick dog onto that, from the end. Hold dog over the flame and grill as you put out a bun and get the cheese laid down and the ketchup handy. Grill to doneness desired and put on bun. Thread next one and work on that as you scarf the first one. Repeat a couple of times. It was a step up from how many ways can you fix ramen... buying the cheapest mysterymeat weird brand hot dogs, almost made them edible. (I called those Grand Avenue Style as I lived on Grand Avenue)
 
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Deb Rebel wrote:Mmmm I don't do meat, .......


Deb, just in case you haven't ventured, you may wish to give some of the vegan hot dogs a try.  As a diehard fan of all things "Wurst", there are a few offerings out there that do a decent....not exact....but respectable job of replicating the classic wiener.   If you are interested in lining up a taste test for you and yours, I would recommend FieldRoast brand frankfurters, Yves brand "good dog", and Lightlife brand "Smartdog".  The trick will be to find your own best way of cooking them as they don't quite have the integrity of the standard meat 'dog' to withstand boiling and with grilling they may lack the fat needed for good sizzle.  My own preference is to use a little oil or vegan margarine and give them a careful browning in a skillet,.....the 'care' part being that they can tend to stick to the pan even with the oil.  (If you use non-stick pans, probably no problem here.)  I've also found them to be more rich and/or dense and therefore prefer to cut them in half lengthwise for a "one bun event".  Otherwise, the myriad of condiments are the same as always.  Bon appetite!
 
Deb Rebel
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John Weiland wrote:
Deb Rebel wrote:Mmmm I don't do meat, .......


Deb, just in case you haven't ventured, you may wish to give some of the vegan hot dogs a try.  As a diehard fan of all things "Wurst", there are a few offerings out there that do a decent....not exact....but respectable job of replicating the classic wiener.   If you are interested in lining up a taste test for you and yours, I would recommend FieldRoast brand frankfurters, Yves brand "good dog", and Lightlife brand "Smartdog".  The trick will be to find your own best way of cooking them as they don't quite have the integrity of the standard meat 'dog' to withstand boiling and with grilling they may lack the fat needed for good sizzle.  My own preference is to use a little oil or vegan margarine and give them a careful browning in a skillet,.....the 'care' part being that they can tend to stick to the pan even with the oil.  (If you use non-stick pans, probably no problem here.)  I've also found them to be more rich and/or dense and therefore prefer to cut them in half lengthwise for a "one bun event".  Otherwise, the myriad of condiments are the same as always.  Bon appetite!


The problem is I'm also celiac and most fakemeats are built with gluten. The sequence is: medical vegan by doctor's orders, then diagnosed Celiac. (about 2.5 years). So I did get to transition from the light meat (we had already cut out red meat, pork, and dark poultry, and I was down to 3 3.5 oz servings a week) to no meat with all the various alternatives available. Some are definitely better than others.

Lightlife dogs weren't worth it. Fieldroast I never seen. Tofurky had a few good bratlike ones and those would stand grilling. Yves had a different issue and rated about with Lightlife. A visual biggie is how a lot of the tofu/gluten type ones is they had sharp sides from the extruder. Had to hide them for sure. One fakemeat I did like was the Morningstar Farms Sausage Patties... even my hubby got to like them. No hitting the rubbery bit of gristle.

I am beyond needing a 'meat' texture in my life now, a few years down the road with celiac so about five from the first cutbacks. The closest I come to 'meat' these days is portabella mushrooms, and if you look on the 'if a vegan friend visited you today, what would you feed them'. I have some lovely foodporn pictures of what I do with portabellas. I can get sliced here, the big caps take a long trip to a large city... but I can make a good 'loosemeat' type sandwich and glue it together sort of with some of my homemade vegan cheese.

I thank you for the recommendations, but they do contain gluten (Seitan if it's listed as an ingredient, is basically wheat gluten). For a lot of fake dogs, you get a bowl of boiling water, then put a couple in and cover it and let it sit for a few minutes, to heat them through and have them keep structural integrity. Panfry, you do need the OIL to make them brown. And nonstick is best or they will glue on. So we agree there too.

Are you a veggie too, John?
 
John Weiland
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Deb Rebel wrote:Are you a veggie too, John?


Well.....let's just say the household is.   ...... and I do all the cooking.  We have free-ranging chickens, the roos of which will end up in the freezer at one point or another and the eggs are taken when we have the urge.  But my wife is pretty strong vegan.  So it's been the crash course at making vegan dishes, but fortunately there is a yuuuuge library of recipes out there for one desiring to replicate meat dishes or forego the replication altogether.  Even 10 years ago, my wife swore she could never give up dairy cheese, but is off of that now as well.  Your gluten point is well taken.....I think we had this discussion once before about trying to find "stretchy" out there in nature that was neither casein-based nor gluten-based.  My search continues! .....

(....I'm not seeing my emoticons button....did I do something to make it disappear?)
 
Deb Rebel
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John, it's good if you are in a mixed household that blends well. If you are celiac, yes the dairy has to go too as casein can get you too.

Now the best hotdog like stuff ever were these strange reddish skinned natural casing fat wieners that were made by a regional shop and we got them where I grew up. They were almost sausage sized but had a superfine grind like hotdogs have. They were sold by weight. They grilled up the absolute best and skin cracking and black bits were the best period, the heart was still juicy, and... Those on a hoagie type bun and liberal amounts of cold ketchup to dunk them in, nirvana. They survived boiling fine, they also worked well sliced into thick coins and crockpotted with mixed veggies and some bbq sauce.

I haven't seen anything like those in years. If you topped those with good beanless chili and some grated cheese... that was worth the calorie coma. They were possibly beef and pork, mostly pork, and some pretty decent quality meat went into them, not all the mystery part leftovers (and definitely not 'mechanically separated' glurp).
 
Roses are red. Violets are blue. Some poems rhyme. But this is a tiny ad:

The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers:
http://richsoil.com/cards


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