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adding a whole house water shut off valve

 
Posts: 60
Location: Westboro, WI Zone 3.5
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HI All,
I've got a problem with plumbing..my outside frost free faucet has a drip. My problem is the yahoo that owned the house before me put the main shut off valve AFTER the faucet. I've got a get a valve in before the faucet with no way to stop the water. Even if I disconnect the power from the pump the pressure tank will still spew water every where.
I planned on putting on one of the "sharkbite" quick connect valve and go form there. But the main line is a 3/4" pressure pipe 310077 and I'm unsure if that will fit.

Suggestions welcomed.
Thanks
 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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How about connecting a hose to your frost free spigot, directing the end to someplace useful/ harmless, cutting power to the pump, and opening the spigot.
The tank would force water through the system until it ran out of pressure, if I understand things correctly.
 
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Damian,
I thought for sure this was "a fool's folly", then I went looking at YouTube. There's some crazy sob's there too.
.
I think personally I would shutoff the water pump and run the pressure off the system, it was dry once upon a time. I had to replace one of the hose bibs a few years ago in Arizona, not knowing how to sweat a copper pipe to a new hose bib I went looking at YouTube.
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I am pretty sure you can get a college or technical engineering degree's worth of education off YouTube.
.
These guys use a compression fitting on a water line that they can't shutoff either. Make sure your fitting will fit the pipe, I would take a cue from these guys using a compression fitting that you tighten down like they did.
.
 
Posts: 50
Location: SW Ohio, 6b, heavy clay prone to hardpan
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A little more info would help.
If you are dealing with a cistern, you could remove power from the pump, run a hose from the faucet to the cistern, and release the water from the pressure tank back into the cistern. Once depressurized, add a valve. Actually add several valves, so that you can service the pump and pressure tanks also.
If you are dealing with a well, cut power to the pump, run a hose from the faucet to anywhere you want to put water (or just put a large bucket under the faucet, most pressure tanks aren't that large) release the pressure and add valves as above.
If you are dealing with an artesian well, I hope there is a valve before the pump. If not you are going to get wet.

Copper is finicky if it's not completely drained near the new solder joints, PVC is a bit more forgiving but still can't be gushing water.
If there are other factors, let us know. It's not too difficult to do this, but it all depends on the details as far as how to best handle the situation.

Best of luck!
 
Posts: 567
Location: Mid-Michigan
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Damian Jones wrote: Even if I disconnect the power from the pump the pressure tank will still spew water every where.



Well, sure. But only for a couple minutes.

So turn off the pump.

Open the faucets. Inside, outside, wherever. The pressure tank will push out all the water it has.

Now you're ready. Cut your pipe apart. It will dribble out whatever water is right there in that section of the pipe, but it won't be pumping since the pump is off, and it won't be spraying since the pressure tank is deflated.

Reconnect and repressurize.
 
Mike Feddersen
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William saves the day, I wish I would have thought of that.
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Here's another YouTube video explainining compression fitting, copper and plastic pipe.
 
Damian Jones
Posts: 60
Location: Westboro, WI Zone 3.5
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Mike Cantrell wrote:

Damian Jones wrote: Even if I disconnect the power from the pump the pressure tank will still spew water every where.



Well, sure. But only for a couple minutes.

So turn off the pump.

Open the faucets. Inside, outside, wherever. The pressure tank will push out all the water it has.

Now you're ready. Cut your pipe apart. It will dribble out whatever water is right there in that section of the pipe, but it won't be pumping since the pump is off, and it won't be spraying since the pressure tank is deflated.

Reconnect and repressurize.



It's been a while since my last visit.  I'd like to thank everyone for the good advice.  It gave me the confidence to tackle the job head on and got it done  
 
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