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Where to buy strawberry seeds, bulk, cheap? (organic, non-F1)

 
Benny Jeremiah
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Where to buy strawberry seeds, bulk, cheap? (organic, non-F1)

I want to buy 500 seeds or more, and either it's..
..the woodland/alpine variety
..F1 varieties
..expensive - 30 seeds for 3 dollars - i'd like 150 seeds for 2 dollars or something alike.
..plants, seedlings. I figure that seeds would be cheaper, easier to plant.

Do you have the answer? Where do you buy strawberry seeds?

 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Benny: Every strawberry fruit has hundreds of seeds on it. Blend up and ferment a few fresh fruits. That'll get you your 500 seeds for a couple bucks.



 
Gilbert Fritz
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All strawberries, except the alpine/ wild types, are F1. Just like apple trees. Most plants that are propagated perennially are hybrids, because there is no need to stabilize them.

Strawberries of the common domestic sort are actually a hybrid species.

I'll throw out the fact that every heirloom was a hybrid once.

If I were you I would do what Joseph suggested, plant your (hybrid) seeds, and select from the different types the ones that do well for you.
 
Benny Jeremiah
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okay, i could do that.

but... how much would they change in the next generation? become sour? Smaller? blue and square?
 
Shawn Harper
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Benny Jeremiah wrote:okay, i could do that.

but... how much would they change in the next generation? become sour? Smaller? blue and square?


Probably worst case some of them would be "wild" varieties... But those always taste better to me. I would be surprised to discover any poor tasting fruit.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Benny Jeremiah wrote:but... how much would they change in the next generation?


The fruit doesn't fall far from the tree. All of the parents, both the mothers and the fathers were great strawberries. Therefore, the children are likely to be great strawberries.

 
Benny Jeremiah
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Okay, your answers put me at ease. Both the fact that variety might not be bad, and that it might be that huge a variety anyway. Thanks for answering.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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