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Where to buy strawberry seeds, bulk, cheap? (organic, non-F1)  RSS feed

 
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Where to buy strawberry seeds, bulk, cheap? (organic, non-F1)

I want to buy 500 seeds or more, and either it's..
..the woodland/alpine variety
..F1 varieties
..expensive - 30 seeds for 3 dollars - i'd like 150 seeds for 2 dollars or something alike.
..plants, seedlings. I figure that seeds would be cheaper, easier to plant.

Do you have the answer? Where do you buy strawberry seeds?

 
gardener
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Benny: Every strawberry fruit has hundreds of seeds on it. Blend up and ferment a few fresh fruits. That'll get you your 500 seeds for a couple bucks.



 
pollinator
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All strawberries, except the alpine/ wild types, are F1. Just like apple trees. Most plants that are propagated perennially are hybrids, because there is no need to stabilize them.

Strawberries of the common domestic sort are actually a hybrid species.

I'll throw out the fact that every heirloom was a hybrid once.

If I were you I would do what Joseph suggested, plant your (hybrid) seeds, and select from the different types the ones that do well for you.
 
Benny Jeremiah
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okay, i could do that.

but... how much would they change in the next generation? become sour? Smaller? blue and square?
 
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Benny Jeremiah wrote:okay, i could do that.

but... how much would they change in the next generation? become sour? Smaller? blue and square?



Probably worst case some of them would be "wild" varieties... But those always taste better to me. I would be surprised to discover any poor tasting fruit.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Benny Jeremiah wrote:but... how much would they change in the next generation?



The fruit doesn't fall far from the tree. All of the parents, both the mothers and the fathers were great strawberries. Therefore, the children are likely to be great strawberries.

 
Benny Jeremiah
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Okay, your answers put me at ease. Both the fact that variety might not be bad, and that it might be that huge a variety anyway. Thanks for answering.
 
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:Every strawberry fruit has hundreds of seeds on it. Blend up and ferment a few fresh fruits. That'll get you your 500 seeds for a couple bucks.



Does anybody know how well (if at all) strawberry seeds react to long freezing?  Someone in my household who shall remain nameless likes to buy cheap frozen strawberries to make slushy drinks with, but they always leave the bags in my freezer so long that the berries become stale and freezer burned.  I've probably got ten pounds of ancient frozen strawberries that will be thrown out, and I'm now wondering if it's worth the effort to slurry these and scatter them in my food forest where strawberry ground cover would be extremely welcome.
 
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Hello Benny,

I assume you want the strawberry seeds for producing a ground cover.
If you do that you will end up with a nice green ground cover that produce a "flood" of strawberry once a year.

Let me propose a different way.
If you get 10-20 true ever-bearing, day-neutral strawberry plant that produce lots of runner, you will have about 100 plants after one year.

The best variety for this strategy is 'Rebecka' (if you can get her). Also good, but less runner, is 'Seascape'.
Look here for varieties that are day-neutral: http://strawberryplants.org/2010/05/strawberry-varieties/

If you do it this way, you will have the whole summer strawberry. Not just one 'flood' of them.
I have for 10 months in a year strawberry. And my 'Rebecka' had produced 134 new plants from one mother plant in one season.


cheers
Andy
 
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