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Growing Strawberries from seeds

 
Adrien Lapointe
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I have some strawberry seeds that I collected from some of last year's frozen strawberries. Do I need to do any special treatment for them to germinate?
 
tel jetson
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what kind of strawberries are they? alpine strawberries (Fragaria vesca) seem to be the easiest. the trick with those is six weeks of cold treatment. pretty easy: just plant them in pots outside early enough that they'll be cold for six weeks before spring. if it's too late for that, some damp sphagnum moss or a damp paper towel in a container or bag in the refrigerator for six weeks should do it. then plant them.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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I have no idea what variety they are. My parents grew the strawberry in their garden and I am almost certain they propagated them from a few plants they bought from a nursery.
 
tel jetson
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hmmm. starting from seed works with some garden strawberries, but I haven't personally had any success. if they do germinate and grow, it's sort of a crapshoot anyhow.

garden strawberries are weird hybrids: the parent species have different ploidy numbers.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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Are there some sort of heirloom strawberry that can be started from seeds?
 
tel jetson
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alpine strawberries are the easiest. they're really small berries, but so very delicious. most varieties don't produce runners, but the plants can live and be productive for much longer than garden strawberry plants.
 
Rion Mather
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I start them using seed starter. I haven't tried the cold treatment. They aren't difficult to grow at all. I have alpine mignonettes (heirloom) growing right now indoors.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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What do those alpine mignonette look like?

What is that seed starter?
 
Rion Mather
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Seed Starter. The stuff in the bag. I use organic Jiffy seed starter and there are many brands.

Here is an older picture of one of my strawberries:



Here is a generic photo off the web:



Like Tel said, they are smaller in size and won't have runners.

 
Jordan Lowery
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I grow alpine strawberries from seed all the time, and if you get the spot right they grow themselves from seed.
 
David Goodman
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Very cool, Rion - I love the photos. I'm going to add this to my list of things to try.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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How much smaller are they? The wild starwberries around here are something like 1/4 inch in diameter. Would those be comparable?
 
Rion Mather
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The couple strawberries I had this fall were little bit bigger than that. Now those were the first so I was excited to even get those so soon. I know the mignonettes can get to 1 inch in length.

I am growing mine in containers. I may transplant them out back this spring. In my zone 5 I can't keep the pots outside through the winter unless I pack them up to protect them. I recommend that you research to see how to grow strawberries in your zone/region.
 
leila hamaya
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i have successfully started strawberries from seed, regular garden strawberry and alpine. i am starting "woodland" wild strawberries (a lot like alpine) in the fridge right now.

i start them in the fridge for two months- in a damp coffee filter inside a plastic baggie. when i take them out i put them on a plate with water, covered with saran wrap. a week or so later pour them onto ALREADY wet soil, so they dont fall too deep in the soil when you water.

i read somewhere they needed both cold stratification and light to germinate, and that has worked for me.

and the wild strawberry, a lot like alpine, are so yummy, the best flavor =)
 
Steve Flanagan
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I Just planted Alexandria Alpine Strawberry seeds. I hope they do well.
 
tel jetson
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Steve Flanagan wrote:I Just planted Alexandria Alpine Strawberry seeds. I hope they do well.


that's definitely the most common strawberry seed I've seen in commerce. pretty darn tasty little berry, too.
 
paul wheaton
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Steve Hoskins
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Wow!
So can I stick a bunch of other seeds inside a strawberry and call it a seed ball?
Mind blown.

 
Chris Badgett
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One of my web design business clients the Wicked Good Farm specializes in growing organic strawberries in Northwest Montana.

They are awesome people and strawberry experts. You can contact them here: http://thewickedgoodfarm.com/contact/

 
Spencer Davis
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Here are some alpine I started from seeds. They are about 3 weeks old
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
tel jetson
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Spencer Davis wrote:Here are some alpine I started from seeds. They are about 3 weeks old


nice. what variety?
 
Angelika Maier
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HOw long do strawberry seeds last? Do they need chill?
 
Spencer Davis
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Tel: those I sprouted are Alpines. They were the first seeds I came across in the store.
 
tel jetson
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there are write a few varieties of alpine strawberry. the most common seems to be Alexandria, so I would guss that's what you're got if they were just labeled 'alpine.'
 
Spencer Davis
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??
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
Jen Shrock
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Woop-woop! I have a few baby alpines starting to sprout (finally). I received them in a seed trade from someone and was wondering if the seeds were still viable as long as they have been taking to sprout.
P4090052.JPG
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Alpine Strawberry Seed Sprouting
 
John Saltveit
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Remember that modern grocery store strawberries are hybrids of two species. They gradually desintegrate in production. It might not be worth it. I would also try musk strawberries, although they grow so well from runners that it might not be worth it.
John S
PDX OR
 
Isabelle Gendron
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Just to revive the post, I grew my strawberry plants last years from seed that I bought from a seedlers here in Quebec. I got 15 seeds of each variete and they all grew. They produced late last summer and gave a lot of runners that i replanted. I guess this years they will produce a lot. I taught it was going to be more difficult than this to sprout sice I had read that they could take long to sprouts. not a t all.

isabelle
 
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