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We bought land  RSS feed

 
                              
Posts: 4
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Hi all,
well we finally found some land we could afford that has great possibilities. But it is in an area with climate/ecosystems we really don't know know much about. It is very hilly (Southwestern Missouri) with not good soil and we are used to rich Iowa black dirt. We are going to need lots of advice so if anyone is from that area or knows anything about that type environment I would love to hear from you. Thanks
 
gardener
Posts: 1352
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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I don't know anything about the area but congratulations on your purchase.
 
                                                                    
Posts: 114
Location: Nashville, Tennessee, USA
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I would recommend studying the history of the area.
What do/did the locals grow?
What trees grow naturally?
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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obviously you aren't living there yet, so I would try to get a source of people to contact regarding plantings in that area..maybe contact the chamber of commerce, ask if there are any local gardening clubs or groups you might get your hands on an address or list...then start writing to them over the winter and asking about seed exchanges, plant exchanges, what they plant successfully, etc.. pen pal wise..get things going on the internet or by mail to become familiar..
 
                            
Posts: 158
Location: Abilene, KS
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Way to go!

Yes, I agree, see what the neighbors are growing and learn from them.  That's the easiest way to do it.  I did it the hard way.  Kept trying to grow stuff like I had in the city, only 30 miles away.  Our property here is too exposed and there's always wind.  I now understand why everyone out here has bushes instead of flowers. My flower beds are full of brome.

Do you have to build your living space?  If you have the time, I think living on your land for a year is a good idea to see how heavy rains flow, etc.  Then you'll know where to put your gardens, etc.  Otherwise, pick a potentially good spot, haul all your compostable stuff there and see if you can get some manure.

Good Luck!
 
                              
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Thanks everyone for the great responses. We aren't planning to move for a couple of years, but I was hoping to get a head start with some fruit trees and bushes that take awhile to get established. I know that there are wild blackberries, maples, Black Walnut and oaks among others. We have a very steep "hollow" that is going to need some clearing, lots of downed trees etc. Blueberries, and strawberries are also grown around there. Have already met some of the local walnut growers and others that are doing farmers markets. Will continue to cultivate relationships with the locals as well. Thanks again
 
pollinator
Posts: 1109
Location: Green County, Kentucky
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If you plant small trees, and aren't going to be there regularly to look after them, mulch heavily to keep them from getting drowned in weeds, and put wire cages around them to keep deer, rabbits, and so on from eating them.

Kathleen
 
                              
Posts: 16
Location: MO
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I have spent most of my life in MO and the best advice I can give is find your local university extension. They are wonderful!

To get started: http://extension.missouri.edu/publications/DisplayPub.aspx?P=G6201
Download the "Revised April 2000" Vegetable planting calendar. It will give you the exact planting dates for your area. Find a local rabbitry and sawmill for manure and sawdust; your soil begins there.

 
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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Congratulations!

My recommendation would be to go there and figure out where you want your orchard (if you even want one, not everyone does) and plant the rest with less expensive trees. Black locus and honey locus are good choices, maybe hickory or some other timber/nut species as well. Maybe try several different species. While you are off and away getting your affairs in order for the move those trees can be storing up carbon for you to use as a source of biomass in your conversion of the site from scrub land to lush garden.

I also totally second the notion of finding what was grown in the area.
 
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