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Woodstove pipe for a tall building  RSS feed

 
thermo kyle
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The building I live at is 75 feet tall. I've read that a woodstove pipe must be taller than the tallest point of a building in order to create an adequate draft and to eliminate unwanted wind patterns created by the building.

Installing an 80 foot woodstove pipe up the side of the building is not an option. The cost will be too high and I am worried this will create way too much draft.

Is it possible to install a shorter stove pipe without causing backflow or draft issues? How tall would you recommend I make the chimney? How far away from the building should the chimney be? Does anyone have any input that could help me understand the problem with installing a woodstove pipe that's shorter than the tallest point of a building, or any recommendations for working around this?
 
Mike Jay
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Welcome to Permies! 

That must be an interesting building you live in.  I don't know about the draft but one reason to have the chimney higher than the roof is so that if hot embers leave the chimney they are more likely to rise above the roof and cool off before they land.  If your chimney stopped halfway up the building and say a foot away from the exterior wall it could smoke up the wall (unsightly) and possibly exhaust hot embers that could ignite the wall.  I guess if you had a chimney fire it would most likely burn down the building.  If the chimney extended above the roof and caught fire it would be less likely to ignite the building.  If you could route the chimney away from the building enough it could reduce/eliminate those issues but you may have draft issues.   Just my thoughts, hopefully someone with more knowledge chimes in.

Pictures may help us understand your issues better.
 
thermo kyle
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The exterior of the bulding is made out of brick, and the interior is made of concrete. Because of the materials the building is made of I think the risk of the buiding burning down is relatively low. The ground is made of pavement and the surrounding area is a large private parking lot, so I'm not super worried about stray embers. Is there a way to mitigate the smoke charring against the side of the building? My primary concern is related to draft and whether or not this type of setup can work without sending a stove pipe all the way up the building. Thank you for your input!
 
Rebecca Norman
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Where I live in a cold part of India, a lot of people just stick their wood-stove pipe out the window. It always leaves a big black smokey stain on the wall. The buildings aren't flammable, but it does look crummy on the outside, and the indoors tend to be smokey as well. The buildings are only 1 or 2 storeys, not 7.
 
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