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How to help heal a Leyland Cypress with scraped bark.  RSS feed

 
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I damaged a 7' cypress and would like to know if I need to do anything to help it heal.
I read that the latest trend is to do nothing and let the tree heal itself. However there is a strong south wind where the wound is and temperature is dropping below 40F.
Here is a photo of the damage.
IMG_1941.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1941.JPG]
 
pollinator
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Location: Quebec, Canada
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I probably would not do anything, but I would start to plan for the succession of this tree by planting another tree.  It is possible that the tree will heal and last many years, but it might always be susceptible to disease and decay, so if you plant it's replacement, when it is time to cut this one down, the replacement is well established.

 
Laurent Voulzy
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I applied this healing paste made in Europe. The tree is fine, probably not because of the paste but because Leyland are very resilient. Will keep this thread updated to document changes.
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Laurent, odds are that the paste will seal the exposed wood to protect it and at the same time allow the sap to form the scab needed to let the tree heal, winner situation there.

I have used a paste formula from an older English gentleman with good success in the past, his formulation did as I described above. There are only problems when you apply something that stops the natural scar healing process such as a tar based product.

Trees have marvelous healing mechanisms, the sap forms a seal then the bark grows back together, much as our own skin heals a cut.
Issues usually arise from insects getting to the exposed inner wood while the scabbing process is incomplete.

Redhawk
 
Laurent Voulzy
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This is music to my ears, Bryant. Thanks for shifting the focus to the toxicity of the tar, which this paste doesn't contain. I say that because googling around or speaking with locals gets you many advises against covering the wound, their assumption is that tar is being used since it is the most readily available product. the transmission of knowledge is an odd thing.
 
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