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Robert Bizzarro
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Hello all,
    I'm new to this site, but not new to the life style. Currently living in an off-grid solar home, (Unfinished of course) in the interior of Alaska, but we are relocating to New England. After 36 years of living in Alaska I've decided it's time to move to Maine. Need to at least dial down the air-conditioning as it where.     

The wife and I are getting on in years, but are still able enough. We plan on building a sandbag/cob/round house with a reciprocal roof once we get back. WE plan to spend the rest of lives developing one last homestead. We have all the tools and knowledge, So...... Here is the question.

When I was in my early 20's I would have given anything to have a piece of ground to live "The life Style". You know, back to earth, agricultural community, sustainable, organic, etc. Now we have the land. In fact plenty of it. It's on a lake in Down East Maine about 1/2 mile from the ocean. It's paradise or could be. So how do I find young folks that would like to trade some sweat equity for a piece of paradise? I tried going the "family route", but the young people I know are just not interested in this life.

We want to build a sustainable community, do a CSA, Small Farm, sawmill, homestead art, crafts products Co-Op type thing. We need help though. Young motivated people that want a piece of their own earth and will help build toward the end goal. I've seen 99% of all commune type endeavors fail in my life, because let,s face it there are workers and there are non-workers. Ownership motivates, building your own thing, motivates. We want to give a helping hand up, not a hand out, but we also don't want to get stuck with unwilling, hard to motivate, lazy kids.

I haven't worked out all the details yet, but there is 65 acres to use, 22 of which are in our name (read sub dividable and can be sold) so it would seem to me we have the foundation. How do we find the help to build the rest of it? Where do we find kids that will contribute to the whole for a piece of earth that they own?

Anyway thanks for reading and any advice is appreciated.




 
Colin McGee
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Location: Media, PA
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I'm following this thread. Good luck, I hope you find good people!
 
Robert Bizzarro
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Colin McGee wrote:I'm following this thread. Good luck, I hope you find good people!


Thanks, I thought once word got out I would have people banging down the door.  What I've found is, people would rather pay $1,500 - $2,500 a month to a bank to live turn key. I don' get it, but there is a lot I don't get.    
 
Shauns Webbers
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Robert . ! Interesting .... Welcome !

        My girlfriend Olivia and I have been searching for the right place to help become part of a small community.   We are 27 + 22... I have been saving tons of reference and practicing permaculture principles for a while now.. I think my ideal house combo has come down to a very similar thought.! A roundhouse/cob/cordwood house . We are both very crafty and artistic, eager to help while lending to our own piece of land to go along with , we are currently in the process of converting an old work van into a creative camper van  ( something we can comfortable live in while working to build a cabin somewhere... we are still unsure as to where, we have put out some vibes towards the northwest coast. We are right now living stuck at parents house while we build and wait for the right place to start building our homestead. however lately I have been thinking of staying somewhere remote but still east coast !  Maine is beautiful . We have put the idea of Vermont or Maine out there for a while.

Perhaps you have the setup we are looking for. maybe- we can come visit and see if we can help ....when our van is all set up by spring ! 
     Check out some of my posts to maybe see some of our media ! 
     

 
 
Miles Flansburg
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Howdy Robert, welcome to permies! Sounds like a great place.
Are you saying that you can/will subdivide off smaller lots and sell/work trade them to young  hard working permies?
 
Sam Potter
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As a young homesteader your place sounds like a dream, if my hubby was more into the homesteading spirit I'd be up there in a jiffy. But he is a stubborn Iowan and wants to stay that way so I wish you lots of luck to find good hard working people
 
Dylan Gillies
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Yes, You got my attention! I'm 26 and my gf is 4 days older than me.. I would love to learn more about this and am also looking to an answer to the question "Howdy Robert, welcome to permies! Sounds like a great place.
Are you saying that you can/will subdivide off smaller lots and sell/work trade them to young  hard working permies?"

fire an email out to me. dylangillies@gmail.com
 
Robert Bizzarro
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Sorry it took me a bit to reply. We live out in the woods beyond cell and internet so I can only respond when I'm in town.

To answer some questions, Yes it is my intent to subdivide and make ownership part of the deal. Like I said, I have not worked out the details, but this is a way for young people with little cash, but willing to work and make this happen be able to own their own land.
If you would like, use Google Earth and search for "Great Pond, Franklin, Maine". It is just outside Ellsworth, Maine. The land I'm talking about is on the left side of the pond. It was cut over a few years ago, so its' ready for pick-up sticks, and ground prep to turn the wooded areas' into pasture.

This is literally a ground up opportunity. There is no homestead or buildings, we are talking about 65 acres of rough woodland right now. It is my intention to say "Okay, Bob and Jane, Gerry, Tina, Glenda and Alice or Rich and Michael this is your land here this piece. Now make a living on it".  I want a community of like minded people, we will share when appropriate, but also be independent and keep the fruits of our own labor.

A bit about us, we are both 50+ and old school. Mostly progressive in our politics, I describe myself as an old, gun totting, Hippie. I have a firearm and I use it. A gun is a tool and a damn good one. We hunt, fish, garden and trap. We eat meat, but not much. Mostly we side with eating veggies. I don't want drug users, HEAVY pot smokers, or booze hounds. This is not rehab or a frat party.

I like a cold a beer after a hard day and if you want to blaze one up after the work is done, good. Just don't show up for work "high" or drunk. What you do and WHO you do is your own business. I really don't think it is anyone's place to comment on that.

I will not tolerate racists, hate speech, troglodytes, bible PUSHERS or violence. I'm not anti-religious just anti pushy. I want good neighbors and friends that can count on the community to rally for support, build each others homes, help with rides to work, appointments or shopping, etc.

Take a look at the site, if hard work and sweat equity appeals, you can contact me directly.

My e-mail is Robert.bizzarro@Gmail.com

Peace.

 
Robert Bizzarro
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Some pics.

as you can see the ground is ready to be worked in some areas' while others still are tree covered.
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Robert Bizzarro
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A few more. Views of the land from the water.

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Ellie Leonard
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Robert Bizzarro wrote:Hello all,
    I'm new to this site, but not new to the life style. Currently living in an off-grid solar home, (Unfinished of course) in the interior of Alaska, but we are relocating to New England. After 36 years of living in Alaska I've decided it's time to move to Maine. Need to at least dial down the air-conditioning as it where.     

The wife and I are getting on in years, but are still able enough. We plan on building a sandbag/cob/round house with a reciprocal roof once we get back. WE plan to spend the rest of lives developing one last homestead. We have all the tools and knowledge, So...... Here is the question.

When I was in my early 20's I would have given anything to have a piece of ground to live "The life Style". You know, back to earth, agricultural community, sustainable, organic, etc. Now we have the land. In fact plenty of it. It's on a lake in Down East Maine about 1/2 mile from the ocean. It's paradise or could be. So how do I find young folks that would like to trade some sweat equity for a piece of paradise? I tried going the "family route", but the young people I know are just not interested in this life.

We want to build a sustainable community, do a CSA, Small Farm, sawmill, homestead art, crafts products Co-Op type thing. We need help though. Young motivated people that want a piece of their own earth and will help build toward the end goal. I've seen 99% of all commune type endeavors fail in my life, because let,s face it there are workers and there are non-workers. Ownership motivates, building your own thing, motivates. We want to give a helping hand up, not a hand out, but we also don't want to get stuck with unwilling, hard to motivate, lazy kids.

I haven't worked out all the details yet, but there is 65 acres to use, 22 of which are in our name (read sub dividable and can be sold) so it would seem to me we have the foundation. How do we find the help to build the rest of it? Where do we find kids that will contribute to the whole for a piece of earth that they own?

Anyway thanks for reading and any advice is appreciated.



Hello, im an 18 year old female living in asheville nc at the moment, but I've been dying to get out there, travel and learn about how to live simple, natural, and just knowing how to cultivate the land in a clean way. I'd absolutely love to be apart of learning from you and helping out best I can.
 
Pascal Paoli
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Hi Robert,
this forum is probably one of the best places to find people. Other than that you should try the regional craigslist forum for the region you are moving to.
There is a lot of young people on craigslist every day.
Also, I do not know if you use facebook, but if you do - use the search field on top to look for a group in that region. You need to click "see all results" on the bottom, than choose "groups" from the tabs on the top. For example: I searched for "maine homestead" and I instantly found a group that is called "maine homesteading". Post your offer in these groups and those people might share it for you. Since they are locals you might find people from there. (https://www.facebook.com/groups/958948104186318/?ref=br_rs ) - there should be a lot of other groups that you could search for and connect with people. just search for words that are related.
Good luck!
 
Robert Bizzarro
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Pascal Paoli wrote:Hi Robert,
this forum is probably one of the best places to find people. Other than that you should try the regional craigslist forum for the region you are moving to.
There is a lot of young people on craigslist every day.
Also, I do not know if you use facebook, but if you do - use the search field on top to look for a group in that region. You need to click "see all results" on the bottom, than choose "groups" from the tabs on the top. For example: I searched for "maine homestead" and I instantly found a group that is called "maine homesteading". Post your offer in these groups and those people might share it for you. Since they are locals you might find people from there. (https://www.facebook.com/groups/958948104186318/?ref=br_rs ) - there should be a lot of other groups that you could search for and connect with people. just search for words that are related.
Good luck!


Thanks, good idea.

 
A Walton
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I would be interested in hearing more about and seeing pics of your life in Alaska. Have you posted any pics anywhere?
 
Kezzie Bizzarro
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Here you go.
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Star of the Yukon Quest 2016 Fairbanks
 
Robert Bizzarro
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Here are the panels
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Robert Bizzarro
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I alsoo turn steel into knives:

Here are a few.

You can also check me out on: http://www.bizzarroblades.com/information.html
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Robert Bizzarro
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Getting ready to eat some smoked Salmon
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Robert Bizzarro
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Going to the Fishing grounds
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A Walton
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Thanks for the pics Robert. Those knives are beautiful! I think you need an apprentice
 
Eddie Conna
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Robert,

your place looks awesome, and the opportunity you're giving is great too.


Here are my thoughts:

MANY people have the "fantasy" of living off grid.  Few will follow through and make it a reality. 

Building from scratch takes a TON of work, (as you know) but also a LOT of knowledge, which sadly, many today simply don't have.  I suspect if you keep the offer out there, eventually you WILL find someone, (or a few) who will take you up on this great opportunity.

Best of luck! 
 
Robert Bizzarro
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How would you like this for a sunset?

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Karlos Basak
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Sam Potter wrote:As a young homesteader your place sounds like a dream, if my hubby was more into the homesteading spirit I'd be up there in a jiffy. But he is a stubborn Iowan and wants to stay that way so I wish you lots of luck to find good hard working people


I empathize from the other side, as it were, with my wife now almost former wife stubbornly refusing to hear the need to relocate to somewhere sustainable. Keep at it and maybe you can one day reach a middle ground that bridges him with your visions!
 
Karlos Basak
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Miles Flansburg wrote:Howdy Robert, welcome to permies! Sounds like a great place.
Are you saying that you can/will subdivide off smaller lots and sell/work trade them to young  hard working permies?


These are some of the questions I have for other startup intentional communities that I visit who are looking for youth to join. Sorry, your new Maine homestead might be a great fit for me in all other regards, but I am not a cold weather tolerant animal! My lack of intrinsic fur...

but I do have some propaganda that you might be interested in using to attract young people, will come back and post if I can find it.
 
Tyler Ludens
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If you intend to have a community, I recommend you read Creating a Life Together by Diana Leafe Christian, which examines how some intentional communities succeed and why most fail. 
 
Karlos Basak
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good sidetracked, but here it is, a play on another world is possible. Feel free to insert your own image and reuse. I used to underestimate the power of meme's, but with the half a generation younger than me and younger, it's the preferred mode of communication it seems (possibly lamentable).

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Robert Bizzarro
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Tyler Ludens wrote:If you intend to have a community, I recommend you read Creating a Life Together by Diana Leafe Christian, which examines how some intentional communities succeed and why most fail. 


I'll do that. Thank you


I have no idea if this will work, I may just be delusional. I am a firm believer in the fact that no good deed goes unpunished.   


However we are getting to old to do interior winters for much longer.




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Richard Lake
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Hi Robert Bizzarro,

What an exciting and interesting opportunity for young folks of which I am one. I will give some suggestions as I live far from the states.

www.workaway.info is a site that I used to explore permaculture. The gist of this site is an exchange of labor for experience, accommodation and food. You get to set the rules and what you can offer for what you would like in return. ie, You could say that you will offer 1 meal a day and accommodation in exchange for a 4 or 5 hours of work etc.

I have done several exchanges and really enjoyed it. You could state that you are looking for more permanent help. You can even set a limited time commitment that you would like young folks to commit to with an option to stay indefinitely or whatever you offer is

Hope this helps.

All the best

Richard
 
Jeremy Franklin
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I think you're looking at a tough road. You clearly have some strong opinions about who you have as neighbors, but you're talking about a land sale.  Once you sell the land, you really have no say on how someone uses it or who they resell it to. Even if you have a rigorous interview process, people change their minds.  Especially young people.  On the other hand, you're right that lazy freeloaders are the expected result if you just offer rent for work or "let's just all cooperate for the common good."  You could possibly do a rent-to-own scenario,  where after 5 years of good,  hard work, people are then given the deed to their land. This might be enough incentive to work hard and build something, while still giving you some leverage to remove people that don't fit your criteria or who wash out.  It's a bigger risk for them, obviously,  but younger people are usually more risk tolerant anyway.

I know this isn't exactly what you asked, but in a way, this is my answer to your question.  I think your success in attracting young, hard-working people lies in your ability to create a package that makes sense,and in which young people can see a pretty stable future.  Remember, the stability of this idea is dependent on the community it produces. If you as the creator/progenitor don't protect that, the whole thing will fail.
 
Robert Bizzarro
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Thanks for the thoughts, Jeremy.

These are things I am thinking about. I'm still working on the details and look forward to hearing any and all ideas about how to organize such an endeavor.

Peace.
 
Javier Ortiz
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Hey man seems sweet! -- this is just a brief summary I've written up on why I want to volunteer.
My name is Javier Ortiz-Marble or Javi in short. I’m a 20-year-old (21 in October) student who recently had a change of heart – well actually I’ve always known that the corporate world does not resonate with my values. I was studying Business Administration for about a year constantly wondering when it was going to get interesting. This led me to taking some time off & trying to re-discover what motivates me. I realized that I NEED to find a way to contribute to society in a meaningful way. I hate the fact that corporations are taking over OUR planet, destroying natural habitats and hoarding resources. I also really dislike the sense of isolation and “every man for himself” culture that seems to be imposed on us. I would love to be a part of a forward-thinking community where we can set our differences aside and work together.  The most valuable thing I can offer is an earnest desire to learn, participate, contribute and grow. The major aspects of Ecovillage’s that interest me are the sense of community, sustainable agriculture and “green building”.
I am extremely interested in becoming a part of an ecovillage or intentional community and would try my hardest to benefit the community. If you are reading this please strongly consider my application for your internship/or acceptance into an intentional community.  It would mean the world to me, literally haha.
Thanks, your friend – Javier Ortiz
 
R Wood
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E mail sent.
 
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