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How many eggshells?

 
Mike Jay
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I've started saving our egg shells for amending around our tomatoes and Honeycrisp apples. 

How much ground up egg shells should you put around each tomato plant?  A teaspoon?  Half a cup? 

The soil test I submitted only gave NPK and PH so I'm not sure I'm even low on calcium.  Am I correct in assuming that it can't hurt to add egg shells?  Is too much calcium even a problem?

Thanks!
 
Taryn Hesse
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Location: Rainy Cold Temperate Harz Mountains Germany 450m South Facing River Valley
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Hi

most animal calcium rich products are relativly ph neutral and not so strongly charged like milk egg shells oyster shells and bone. so they should stay intact untill the soil becomes far from neutral. Exactly how far depens on the other positive and negativly charged particles in the soil eg. aluminum or humus. Earth worms would eat the egg shell powder too making more callcium available but the castings would be relativly neutral as guts of most animals balance digestive juices out. the soil critters would also move it around a bit. If you don´t see blossom end rot you could put it in your compost first and itl get spread out that way too. Id be real surprised if you killed\injured a plant with a half cup of eggshell powder. If your trying to raise pH wood ash and lime have a fast effect, egg shell powder would only help add calcium gradually.
 
Mike Jay
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Thanks Taryn!  So if I'm understanding correctly, adding ground up egg shells shouldn't change the pH.  And adding too much wouldn't cause any problems.

I did have blossom end rot last year with relatively consistent rain so that's why I'm thinking about doing it. 

I guess I'll just see how much I get between now and summer and evenly distribute it.  I'm also assuming that grinding them up tinier is better for the worms to chew on.
 
Taryn Hesse
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Location: Rainy Cold Temperate Harz Mountains Germany 450m South Facing River Valley
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Hi
yep, the egg shells shouldn´t effect ph and ground is better, or faster acting. Its a bit like rock dust but quicker to break down because its more biological than mineral.
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I've begun turning mine into biochar. I'm too lazy to grind them, and they stay whole in my compost for years. Ever get one lodged under your fingernail?
No fun at all!
I've dumped the char into the chicken s deep bedding.
I could grind them and heat them too use as a calcium supplement, but again, I'm lazy 😏
 
2017 Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs http://richsoil.com/pdc
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