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Grafting

 
Alison Thomas
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Hmmm, not quite sure if this is 'woodland care' though it is tree care.

I bought an (expensive) apple maiden last autumn and within hours of it being planted the geese had de-barked it    I have a feeling that if a tree has its bark removed around the full circumference of the trunk then it will die as the sap can't rise - is that right?  If so, is there still a chance that I can take cuttings from the top part of the tree and graft them onto a better chance for a base?  If so, what trees are good to graft apples onto?  I know that quince is good for pear, but apples
 
Kay Bee
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Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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Sorry to hear of the damage to your tree.

It sounds like your tree would need a bridge graft to give it a chance to survive.  I would suggest taking some scion wood cutting from above and keeping some of them in cold storage (as a back-up) and using other cuttings to try the bridge graft to restore the connection of the cambium layer.

Here is a link with pics and a description of the bridge grafting technique:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/grafting.html

If the top growth dies this spring, it may be worth trying to cut back the dead material and re-use the rootstock for a new graft.  There are lots of types of easier grafts that could be used in this case.  You could even salvage the loss by stooling the rootstock and turning it in to a yearly source of rootstock for future projects.
 
Alison Thomas
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SouthEastFarmer wrote:
Sorry to hear of the damage to your tree.

It sounds like your tree would need a bridge graft to give it a chance to survive.  I would suggest taking some scion wood cutting from above and keeping some of them in cold storage (as a back-up) and using other cuttings to try the bridge graft to restore the connection of the cambium layer.

Here is a link with pics and a description of the bridge grafting technique:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/grafting.html

If the top growth dies this spring, it may be worth trying to cut back the dead material and re-use the rootstock for a new graft.  There are lots of types of easier grafts that could be used in this case.  You could even salvage the loss by stooling the rootstock and turning it in to a yearly source of rootstock for future projects.


Thank you for the link - I'll give it a go tomorrow but I don't know if the bridge material is long enough 

Please could you explain a bit more about your last sentence, the rootstock bit.
 
Kay Bee
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Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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Sure - here is a link to a site with some pictures of how the stooling process works.  If your bridge graft fails (or is not possible), you would be starting at step 3 (removing the dead grafted material) and hoping that the rootstock has enough reserve energy to put up some new shoots from below the old graft line.

http://www.suttonelms.org.uk/apple72.html

Depending on your soil, you may want to go with that or some nice sifted compost or even sawdust to mound around the base of the rootstock once it starts sending up shoots.  This will encourage rooting up above the original ground level and allow you to remove the shoots with the roots intact much more easily.  These then get transplanted to where you want them to grow and to be used for grafting at a later date.

 
Jordan Lowery
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we have had this happen to a few trees( but it was a wild animal ) like said if you leave the trees they will most likely re sprout from the rootstock. now this wont be the tree you bought, but if you took scion cuttings and stored them properly you can re graft onto the rootstocks new shoots.

you can also just buy some rootstocks for cheap, turn that one almost dead tree into many trees.
 
Suzy Bean
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Paul talks a bit about grafting in this podcast: http://www.richsoil.com/permaculture/378-podcast-057-preparing-a-food-forest/
 
Brenda Groth
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just the opposite problem here..had 4 peach trees that died above the graft and then sent out new suckers from the rootstock.

myself..i have a hard time parting with anything with leaves..so i transplanted these back into the edges of our woods to see if they would grow..one has died but so far other 3 are growing.

i figure if they  make it..I'll try to transplant some grafts of other peach, plum, apricot, etc.. to these rootstocks in the future.
 
Alison Thomas
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That's so nice to keep them going Brenda.  I'm feeling that way too and have found loads of saplings of walnut and sweet chestnut in the middle of our fields whilst scything so I've marked them and will transplant them in the winter.
 
Brenda Groth
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during grafting season I think some of you with good grafting experience should visit my little abode and help me graft some tops to my now growing rootstock..

i'm not real confident, have read a lot but  not done anything successfully
 
Jordan Lowery
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for those who grow them from seed or the rootstock grows back. if the fruit is just ok for human use. the animals love the fruit. falling peaches make chickens very happy.
 
Brenda Groth
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does anyone know what the roots stock would be from for peaches..i have 3 rootstocks happily growing back..would they be from a type of peach or something else..if they are a peach I would love if they grow.

my SIL also gave me 2 peaches she grew from pits and they have taken well to the transplant..although they are only about a foot tall.

i will allow these rootstocks to grow and see what they come up with

also have 2 pole apples that have died above the graft and 2 richmond cherries that died above the graft and are regrowing..i would like to know what to expect if i just let them grow..not real knowledgable about rootstocks..so advice would be welcome
 
kane Abbott
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Jaune De Metz is a good rootstock for appels . timming is everthing.
 
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