• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Milwaukee fuel circular saw and Sawzall. They are awesome  RSS feed

 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have purchased some Milwaukee cordless tools. Two of them are from the Milwaukee fuel line.

The circular saw and reciprocating saw are both awesome.
.........
Most of the text in this thread will be made up from text messages that I sent my brother and others, about these tools, so some of it might be redundant.
........
   Message to my brother...
My new Milwaukee Fuel circular saw, cuts just as well as a plug-in model. Overall speed is greater, with a lighter tool. It's made for left-handed use. I was at Home Depot, about to buy the 60 volt Dewalt circular  saw and reciprocating saw which were on sale. I encountered the Milwaukee representative and he made an offer I couldn't refuse. I got two, 9 amp hour batteries which retail for $279 each,  for free. I then bought a grinder for $149, which came with a free  battery and charger set that normally sells for $169. My total was about $750 for the circular saw, reciprocating saw and grinder. A little less than the cost of the inferior tools. Every review, puts Milwaukee ahead. On footage of cut between battery changes, they are 40% and 60% ahead of the two closest competitors which are Makita and DeWalt. Then, a day later, an impact driver came on Used Victoria. Bought it for $75, including a $150 battery. I have four tools and four batteries.

 I may never fuck with a generator again, other than when cutting stucco or jackhammering.
20170413_145326.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20170413_145326.jpg]
20170423_172122.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20170423_172122.jpg]
20170411_110339.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20170411_110339.jpg]
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
 The Milwaukee Fuel Sawzall, is more productive than a top-of-the-line plug-in model. I've done a lot of cutting , in removing the pony walls from a house that was lifted. Battery life is not going to be an issue. These tools couldn't work with dummies operating them, but I expect them to become the standard for carpenters, plumbers and others that look after their equipment. Generators are now obsolete for me, except when I'm using a jackhammer or cutting stucco. My machine has plenty of power to cut stucco, but I wouldn't want to destroy it with grit.

I used the grinder to sharpen the first inch of Sawzall blades that usually get dull before the rest. A very handy tool that fits perfectly into my hand. I've also sharpened my hedge cutter. It took 15 minutes. The sharpening shop wanted $90.
20170421_155345.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20170421_155345.jpg]
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I cut each joist twice, so that it could fall freely , without pushing on the standing portion. It takes about 3 seconds per cut. Overall it was about one-third faster than using my 15 amp Milwaukee plug-in saw. Didn't even consume the first bar on the battery. I've also cut that section of roof on the side porch. Roofing, OSB and heavy old fir 1 by 4. It went into overload twice, but this required only a five-second wait. When plugged into the house , I often flip the breaker and have to go to the basement.

This saw would be faster for both tasks, even if we had power available on this job.
20170413_144342.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20170413_144342.jpg]
 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1316
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
55
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Milwaukee tools are awesome no doubt, but I recently switched to all Ridgid tools.  If you buy them from Home Depot, they have a free lifetime warranty on everything, including the batteries and chargers.  That's a deal I can't pass up.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, Ridgid Tools have price and warranty on their side.

None of their tools can do the sort of work I'm doing, at a pace necessary to be considered professional. I am looking to compete directly with top of the line plug-in tools. The ones I'm using are more productive. I have the 36 volt Makita saw that also takes a 7 1/4 inch blade. It's a decent saw, perfectly fine for home use, but not half as productive as the Milwaukee circular saw. I've tried cutting through roofing material which includes asphalt,  metal flanges and wood. It reaches overload too quickly, and comes to a complete halt. Various reviews say that it is about half as productive. I have found that it just won't do certain jobs.
 
Todd Parr
pollinator
Posts: 1316
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
55
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Granted.  Even the new line of Ridgid can't compete with Milwaukee for professional tools.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Milwaukee distributors sometimes put on special events that only contractors on their list are invited to. Price reductions are so great, that you end up paying about 60% of what it would cost to buy it off the shelf at Home Depot. This makes them cost-competitive even with the lowly Ryobi junk.
 
John Weiland
Posts: 950
Location: RRV of da Nort
46
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dale,

Welcome back and thanks for these continuing reviews of the cordless equipment.  I'm just finally on the verge of retiring...both myself and my hobby tools, the latter of which are older generation non-Lithium battery units.  So these reviews will be invaluable in the coming months.  As the body itself is feeling the days of autumn, I was wondering if you had an opinion about "ladders for geezers".  For most of the past decades, a 20 year-old aluminum extension ladder got me up to the second story outside of the house for repairs, gutter cleaning, antenna installations, etc.....and the wobble in the ladder (not a pricey unit) was all a part of feeling at one with the high winds of the Great Plains.

Looking for something a bit sturdier, but need to keep it light as neither my wife nor I will be able to hoss around anything too heavy.  Also have noted some of the roof-contacting stabilizer bars that can be added to any ladder.  Do you have an opinion on aluminum versus fiberglass (or some other material) and what brand might serve our purpose?  I'm pretty sure our current ladder is either a 16 or 20 foot extension ladder, so we would have to maintain that length.  If you wish, you can just PM me the information.....and if there is another thread for this topic, please let me know.  Thanks!
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Unfortunately, with aluminum ladders it seems that every ounce of stability is matched by another ounce or pound of weight. Fire departments and tactical squads sometimes have carbon fiber ladders. I haven't tried one and don't know what they cost. I think that part of the appeal is a reduced chance of electrical shock. I know this is the case with fiberglass ladders which are commonly used by electricians.
.........
At some point in most people's lives, there comes at time when they would be well advised to give up ladder use altogether. Think of what happens to a teenager who takes a fall, and compare that to what happens to someone 75. Some elderly people pay very dearly, when they try to do the things that they no longer can accomplish safely. There are lots of young people available to do this type of work. When I reach that age, I will hire them and I will work at more skilled things that happen closer to the ground.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
266
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's another copy of a text sent to my brother, who should buy these tools, but is resisting.
........
   I used the cordless Milwaukee circular saw to cut up enough heavy old fir firewood to fill a pickup truck. I went through about 45% of available battery power. That's more cutting than I've ever done in a day of building. When doing this with a corded saw, it is very easy to accidentally cut that cord.

The saw is tilted on a 45 degree angle, so that gravity helps push it along.

I used a $7.50  24 tooth Diablo framing blade. Although I hit a few nails, it still cuts. A chainsaw would have been slower and would have resulted in at least $50 worth of chain damage.

Extension cords are obsolete.
20170502_200009.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20170502_200009.jpg]
 
please buy my thing and then I'll have more money:
Complete Wild Edibles Package by Sergei Boutenko (1 HD video + 10 eBooks)
https://permies.com/t/70674/digital-market/digital-market/Complete-Wild-Edibles-Package-Sergei
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!