• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

What Grows Well in GA?  RSS feed

 
Angelica Harris
Posts: 49
Location: Statesboro, GA
food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm sure this has been asked before so I hope I'll be forgiven. I'm planning my garden for next season and want to try some new varieties, preferably more heirlooms. On that note, do you guys have any favorites? Or know any tried and true cultivars that do well in Georgia or the Southeast USA. Any recommendations are much appreciated!
 
Annie Lochte
Posts: 66
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
3
chicken forest garden goat
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Low maintence stuff for me this year (summer) Seminole pumpkins, asparagus beans, (yard long beans) sweet potatoes... Okra. Coming to an end now of course. This winter I'm planting cabbage, sweet onions, garlic, lettus/radish/kale...  More. Maybe if you post what you're used to growing it would be easier to recommend alternatives...  I browse over the southern exposure seed exchange and other seed catalogs regularly, SESE has lots of heirloom stuff for our area. I just get a couple new varietys each year an plant it...
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
Posts: 1387
Location: northern California
46
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Years of experience gardening, both in Georgia and elsewhere, has taught me the importance of learning about and growing local or regional varieties, as opposed to the standard varieties grown commercially.  For example the Butternut and Acorn varieties of winter squash, so common in every supermarket, are not the best for the South.  In some cases though the opposite is true, with tomatoes for instance.  I found that "heirlooms" of every kind I tried were usually disappointing compared to hybrids.  But local sources will help discern this too.  Some exotic plants that are not common at all nationally thrive in the hot summer....Indian spinach, kangkong or water spinach, and  Surinam spinach or talinum come first to mind....all of which can be eaten raw as salad and thrive on heat and humidity when other salad crops are impossible.   A lot of the Asian vegetables, both warm and cool season, are good possibilities too. Georgia Organics is a good resource.
 
I love a good mentalist. And so does this tiny ad:
Video of all the permaculture design course and appropriate technology course (about 177 hours)
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!