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Sill splashing - erosion ?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 175
Location: Timisoara, Romania, 45N, 21E, Z6-7
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Hi everyone.

I'm wondering about the best way to protect the sill area on a SB house.
Since the foundation wall on which the SB rests upon is not very tall (50cm / 20"), there will be some splashing from the area around the building to the wall itself.
The foundation part is well protected but the sill area of the SB wall is making me a little uneasy.

I have locally available heavy duty aluminum window sill that i want to install at the joint between foundation and wood sill plates.
I can then come with the render to meet this area as in the attached drawing.

Now, i have 2 thoughts:
1. Lime render should be done in such a way that it won't crack in this region
2. Careful detailing should be done to stop water ingress

Another thought : if the lime render should stop above the sill mounting heel or come down and rest upon it.
If above, i'll have to put extra flashing behind it to stop water ingress.
If it will come down, it may crack as it's a different material even if i use some reinforcing/ backing mesh.

Thoughts, experiences, something else ?
sb-sill.png
[Thumbnail for sb-sill.png]
SB sill area
 
Posts: 2087
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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The key to protecting walls with natural finishes is to ensure that the water doesn't get there in the first place. If water is regularly splashing down onto your foundation and wall footings then your roof overhang is inadequate. The root of the problem is the water falling to close to the structure, not the sill itself.
 
Ionel Catanescu
Posts: 175
Location: Timisoara, Romania, 45N, 21E, Z6-7
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Maybe i should explain better.

There will be a pavement outside the house.
One of it,s roles is to divert water away from the foundation.
However, it's a pretty hard surface and under hard windy rain water will hit it and bounce back onto the foundation wall or even on the sill area.
Overhangs i have a little more than 3ft (1m).
Honestly, in this scenario, only 3 times as much overhang will completely protect.
But this is impractical and rain does not always fall perpendicular to the ground.

It's for these rare ocasions that i consider my options.
 
Posts: 45
Location: New Hampshire, USA zone 5/6
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food preservation homestead wofati
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You said it yourself, water getting to the sill would be a rare occasion. The sill should have plenty of time to dry out between such rare rain events. So i dont see that this is such concern. Perhaps once every 10years the rain gets so bad you have to put out some sand bags or something to protect the area, but thats true for most houses in that once in a decade rain event.

I’d love to see pictures of your build since Im researching building methods myself at this time.
 
Posts: 658
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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What is SB construction please?
Also, most traditional forms of wall finishing need maintenance over time.
I imagine that will be then case for your lime plaster, running or dripping water is what causes most damage.
Over time you may find most of the wall surface is ok, but a few places suffer, and its those places you improve the weather protection.
After that it should be simple.
 
Jackie Frobese
Posts: 45
Location: New Hampshire, USA zone 5/6
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I believe SB is straw bale
 
Ionel Catanescu
Posts: 175
Location: Timisoara, Romania, 45N, 21E, Z6-7
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Hi Jackie.

As you said, some water will get there from usual rains but it's nothing to worry much.
It's the 1 or 2 times a year when there are major storms that i'm trying to single out.
Pictures will have to wait as i'm not in that phase yet.

John, true for the maintenance.
I'm just trying to avoid some of it if i can or make it less often.
A possibility would be to make the bottom plaster layer a little thicker.
Either way, as i was told, the secret is in the plaster.
A good lime material is essential - and, at least over here, it means i'll have to slake it myself.
Bagged hydrated lime is garbage.
 
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