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Need a good recourse for plant cloning

 
                              
Posts: 3
Location: Michigan
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I'm looking for a book or database etc that goes extensively into plant cloning. For example Fruit trees, grape vines, tomatoes etc are commonly known, but what about some of the newer types of plants we are now growing. i.e. Becoming more diverse, polyculture etc.

Maybe it's an odd question but I think it could be a valuable skill to learn/have. I've been looking all over the net and in books, but have not found much. Most recourses just offer the usual tomato, potato strawberry etc. What about amaranth or sunchokes? Maybe experimenting is the answer.

Anyway it's always good to get the minds churning. LOL
 
                          
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Amaranth produces so much seed, and comes true to parent form so well from seed, that there's really no need to do vegetative propagation.  Sunchokes are vegetatively propagated.

Here's a reference for woody plants:  http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/pnw0152/pnw0152.html

Have you looked at YouTube? I just checked and there's a lot there on plant cloning, mostly pot related.

Dan
 
                              
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Location: Michigan
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Totally agree on amaranth etc. lol Its the skill I'm looking to develop. Woody plants are somewhat easy or known, but maybe not practiced enough. It's a topic that won't leave me alone. If I can make a potential tomato forest from 1 mother plant, what else is possible? We do have seeds now for the most part, but what if the Monsanto's of the world get there way etc. Or what about using cuttings from things like stevia that is hard to grow well from seed. There may not be a problem, but I'm still looking for the solution. Being proactive I guess.
 
                    
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Hartman and Kester's book "Plant Propagation" is used in many horticulture classes as a textbook. Thick, expensive, lots of scientific terminology and detailed discussion of different propagation strategies.

http://www.amazon.com/Hartmann-Kesters-Plant-Propagation-Principles/dp/0136792359

Kyte's "Plants from Test Tubes" is a more approachable book that deals mostly with in vitro propagation - cloning in agar jelly.  It is more suitable for home or small lab/nursery techniques for cloning.

http://www.amazon.com/Plants-Test-Tubes-Introduction-Micropropagation/dp/0881923613/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1299425890&sr=1-1
 
Mekka Pakanohida
Posts: 383
Location: Zone 9 - Coastal Oregon
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I was recently advised to grow "Willow" for cloning reason later on.  Seems something in the bark or woody stems of Willow trees has an active ingredient that is used for making clones.
 
Jordan Lowery
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my best advice is to just get to know the plant you wish to propagate. chances are once you know that you will know how to propagate it. also knowing how the plant naturally reproduces is highly beneficial. does it spread with runners? does it spread by seed? does it spread by animals? etc....
 
Jonathan 'yukkuri' Kame
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Mekka Pakanohida wrote:
I was recently advised to grow "Willow" for cloning reason later on.  Seems something in the bark or woody stems of Willow trees has an active ingredient that is used for making clones.


Yes, willow has a high concentration of rooting hormone.  I think it is concentrated in the whips, particularly the tips.  I think you pretty much crush some willow tips, soak in water and use that 'tea' to root whatever cuttings you are trying to make.
 
                          
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Jonathan's book recommendation sounds great.  I hate to pay that much for a book that's been out for a while though. 

It looks like the 1990 edition can be had for $1.12, plus shipping, if you don't mind some minor wear.
http://product.half.ebay.com/Plant-Propagation/1952374&tg=info

Dan
 
                              
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Location: Michigan
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I knew this would be the place to ask this question, Permies Rocks.
I was wondering if there was a horticulture text book on the subject.
The suggestions already should keep me busy foe a bit.
Thanks a ton.
 
Paul Cereghino
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Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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Dirr, MA and C.W. Heuser, Jr. 2006.  The reference manual of woody plant propagation: from seed to tissue culture. Varsity Press, Cary, NC.  This is good both for general learning, as well as a very long list of specific recommendations by species.

My thesis is on-line with a liturature review related to getting roots from stem cuttings (live stakes).  There is a good story line in there about hormones, juvinility of tissue, and the rest... response varies greatly among species.

http://www.ser.org/sernw/pdf/cereghino_thesis_2004.pdf

As well as other materials concerned with using woody cuttings in the field.
http://www.ser.org/sernw/d2d_2005.asp

Learning to clone plants is critical for installing sites on a shoestring...
 
                          
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Thanks Paul.  Looks like a new edition is out from a different publisher.  Timber Press.  Paperback.  About $34.

http://product.half.ebay.com/The-Reference-Manual-of-Woody-Plant-Propagation/71270847&tg=info

Dan
 
Mekka Pakanohida
Posts: 383
Location: Zone 9 - Coastal Oregon
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yukkuri_kame wrote:
Yes, willow has a high concentration of rooting hormone.  I think it is concentrated in the whips, particularly the tips.  I think you pretty much crush some willow tips, soak in water and use that 'tea' to root whatever cuttings you are trying to make.



Thank you, I love learning! 
 
duane hennon
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another good book is

http://www.amazon.com/Secrets-Plant-Propagation-Vegetables-Houseplants/dp/0882663704

covers a wide range of plants giving a number of ways to propagate each plant.
good How-to book
 
Franklin Stone
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I own a copy of this book:

American Horticultural Society Plant Propagation: The Fully Illustrated Plant-by-Plant Manual of Practical Techniques by Alan Toogood

http://amzn.com/0789441160

I have not read any of the other suggestions here so I don't know how it compares to them, but it has an exhaustive list of species and techniques for cloning, grafting, seed, etc. It seems like a good general reference for beginners, and it is a very attractive book.
 
Matthew Fallon
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Ahhh thanks for this thread!

i took woody clippings from a few things 2 weeks ago.
grape,goji berry, kiwi and blueberry, and simply put them in some water .
the kiwi sticks are now covered in leaves! i wonder though if they'll root or if the leaves will last? ill check some of the resources above,,

thank you again!
 
Burra Maluca
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frankenstoen wrote:
I own a copy of this book:

American Horticultural Society Plant Propagation: The Fully Illustrated Plant-by-Plant Manual of Practical Techniques by Alan Toogood

http://amzn.com/0789441160

I have not read any of the other suggestions here so I don't know how it compares to them, but it has an exhaustive list of species and techniques for cloning, grafting, seed, etc. It seems like a good general reference for beginners, and it is a very attractive book.


That's the one we use, except that it's the UK version with a different colour scheme and labelled 'Royal Horticultural Society' instead of 'Americal Horticultural Society'.  It is excellent, the only downside being the size of the print which is fine if you have good eyesight but my other half mutters darkly about the way stuff seems to be designed by teenagers with perfect vision.  The small print does mean that they managed to squeeze a terrific amount of information into a relatively normal sized book through. 

The Amazon link has a 'look inside' feature so you can check what you're getting before you buy. 
 
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