paul has a new video  

 



visit the thread.

see the DVDs.

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Hay bale cob?  RSS feed

 
Tommie Hockett
Posts: 45
Location: Callisburg Texas
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is it possible to use haybales instead of strawbales? Then put a layer of cob on the inside and out. I live in zone 7b we have very wet springs and wet winters also. Also it is humid year round. Would a bale house or cob either or standup to our weather?
 
Tommie Hockett
Posts: 45
Location: Callisburg Texas
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry the reason I was asking about haybales instead of straw is because availability in our area. Haybales can be had for 4-11 dollars per bale where as straw you have to buy at tractor supply or the equivalent for $8 per bale.
 
Sebastian Köln
Posts: 120
Location: Germany · Schleswig-Holstein · Eutin
2
bike toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would not build with staw (or hay for that matter) on the outside in a wet climate again. Learned that the hard way.
Both will rot when they get moist.

Can you add a (edit: ventilated) layer to keep the wall dry from the outside?
 
Tommie Hockett
Posts: 45
Location: Callisburg Texas
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes sir I could... just not sure what to add? Without building a "conventional" house. I am looking for qays to build a good but affordable house using some sort of natural materials. I have looked into cordwood and since cedar are prolific around here it would definetly be within budget. However I bale my own hay so that would almost be free.
 
Sebastian Köln
Posts: 120
Location: Germany · Schleswig-Holstein · Eutin
2
bike toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
After sleeping over the problem, my conclusions so far are:
Hay is probably used best similar to help insulation. (Added to the dried wall.)

That would require to build the inner and the outer wall first, with a hollow space to put the hay in.

So the next question is what kind of inner and outer wall fits best?

I can think of:
- Wattle and Daub (requires a lot of cob, and a bunch of sticks)
- battens covered with cob (requires a lot of wood, less cob)
- compressed earth (probably only on the inner wall)
 
Tommie Hockett
Posts: 45
Location: Callisburg Texas
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sebastian Köln wrote:
I can think of:
- Wattle and Daub (requires a lot of cob, and a bunch of sticks)
- battens covered with cob (requires a lot of wood, less cob)
- compressed earth (probably only on the inner wall)


Thank you Sebastian I appreciate the ideas. I have the plans to build a cinva ram for CEB's. My problem is not only with the hay and/or straw. I am curious if cob or CEB's would stand up to the humidity and rain of our region. Since it is basically jist mud and straw. My idea would be to make a wattle wall with possible a dob made from lime and shredded paper of straw. Do you think this would work? Or os my thinking way off the mark
 
Sebastian Köln
Posts: 120
Location: Germany · Schleswig-Holstein · Eutin
2
bike toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know. But using paper on the outside layer might make me nervous. Then again, this house here is being painted with linseed oil (mixed with loam and titanium dioxide)…

To me this would require an experiment.

Another approach, I am currently trying to figure out for a house in the Greater Caucasus, that separates the weather-shielding part from the (main) insulation:

The main benefit (for me) is the ability to reach all areas of the insulation without damage to anything else. (And a lot of storage space that doesn't need to be heated).
thread: https://permies.com/t/72471/Layered-house

Edit nr. infinite: Windows will need some thoughts… But they should be less fragile than in a monolithic house.
double.png
[Thumbnail for double.png]
 
Daniel Ray
pollinator
Posts: 138
Location: Stevensville, Montana; Zone 4b
21
food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tommie,

while haybales are not generally recommended I know of one mention of a balecob home being built with hay rather than straw from the cobweb books put out by cob cottage company in oregon. I believe it was built in Finland. Balecob is successfully implemented in wet conditions such as oregon, washington, and vancouver. check out my balecob house mid  construction from my signature below if you want. Also, more recent updates of my house are found on permies if you want to check out other posts i've made. The consensus is that the cob/earthen coat over the bales actually helps pull moisture that may enter the bale.

My greatest advice is to call cob cottage and ask them specifically about the haybale/cob build in finland. They will have heard results of this experiment years after it was finished which is what you want.
 
Tommie Hockett
Posts: 45
Location: Callisburg Texas
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks yall. Sebastien I enjoy the conversation and the house plan looks awesome. As for the windows you could make all of them very deep and put either plants or reading nooks in all of them.

Daniel Thank you for the information I will most definetly follow up on it.

Sorry for the delay I have basically been working non stop since monday night. But hey it shoukd be a good payday haha. I will keep yall posted as I come up with ideas/solutions
 
Montana has cold dark nights. Perfect for the heat from incandescent light. Tiny ad:
Complete Wild Edibles Package by Sergei Boutenko (1 HD video + 10 eBooks)
https://permies.com/t/70674/digital-market/digital-market/Complete-Wild-Edibles-Package-Sergei
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!