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A giant list of things you can make yourself

 
gardener & author
Posts: 2016
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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The idea here is to make a thread with a huge list of things that you can make in your home to reduce what you need to buy in the stores. I am always surprised to hear how much people are spending on stuff from the store that can be made at home!

Less plastic. Less toxic gick. Less transport. Less planned obsoleteness.

For the purposes of this thread please leave out any food items. Those are important but not quite what I'm going for here.

I am hoping that each item on this list is relatively short. It could be a word. It could be a sentence. A few sentences is pushing it and more than a small paragraph is too much. :)
 
Shawn Klassen-Koop
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Posts: 2016
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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Handkerchiefs - no more boxes of facial tissue!
 
Shawn Klassen-Koop
gardener & author
Posts: 2016
Location: Manitoba, Canada
619
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Clothing (including slippers, hats, mittens, sweaters, etc.)
 
Shawn Klassen-Koop
gardener & author
Posts: 2016
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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We like to reuse our old birthday, wedding, holiday, and greeting cards and make them into "new" cards.
 
Shawn Klassen-Koop
gardener & author
Posts: 2016
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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Making your own laundry soap - if you're into the whole laundry soap thing.
 
Posts: 7051
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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lye soap
castile soap
lotions
ointments
salves
tinctures


kitchen towels (from thrift store finds)
kitchen rags (to replace paper towels)
potholders
dish cloths

 
Judith Browning
Posts: 7051
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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handmade/homemade gifts



 
master steward
Posts: 10015
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Baby wipes (cut up old towels, rags, bathroabs, and/or t shirts and zig-zag stitch the edges)

Wool diaper covers from old sweaters.

Menstrual pads
 
pollinator
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Location: Southern Arizona. Zone 8b
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With the right skill set you can build almost ANYTHING yourself.

I've built computers from scratch; etching my own circuit cards and soldering on discrete components, vehicles from scratch, houses, solar trackers, grey water systems, water filters and pumps, a china cabinet, book cases, desks, cupboards, closets, etc., an evaporative cooler for a skoolie, 3D printers which I've used to build numerous plastic parts; equipment cases, connectors for rainwater&aquaponics systems, etc., rock walls, bee hives, barns, sheds,  workshops, driveways, radio transmitters, a home control network, clothes, curtains, controllers for solar heaters, tile floors, chicken coops, and the list goes on.

For the most part, the only limits on what you can build are your imagination and willingness to learn new skills.
 
gardener
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Babies.

And it's actually not that much work once you figure out a system.  We made two of them and my dear wife said that's enough, but I'm willing to do some more research into improvements on the process.
 
garden master
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Location: West Tennessee
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Suet for the birds! We use old cardboard milk cartons as a mold, then slice into suet blocks and brush with hot pepper sauce to deter the squirrels.
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pollinator
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Gosh, I can't think of all the things that I home make, compared to my friends who go out and buy stuff. I don't buy paper towels - I use rags from discarded clothing I get for free. I don't buy flowerpots for my seedlings- I make my own out of discarded containers I get from the dump. I made my own hydroponic system. My own greenhouses and mini greenhouses. My own garden labels. I didn't buy a house address sign (required here)- instead I made my own artsy house number sign. All my yard art is homemade. I've made many pieces of furniture out of purchased cedar and ohia harvested off my own land. I'm presently making picture frames out of wood and other materials from my land. I've made plenty of raised garden containers and mini ponds instead of buying them at Home Depot. Most gifts are handmade. Much of my art decor is handmade by me or my friends, I've been gifted items that my friends sell for in the hundreds, even thousands, so these are not cheesy looking items! Homemade doesn't mean poor quality. I've also made some clothing, but sewing doesn't thrill me, so I don't do it much.

I guess if I thought about it, I could list more. But making my own is a normal way of life now. 20 years ago I would have gone to the store for my stuff.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Instead of a giant list of things, how about a list of giant things.......

More things we've made ourselves instead of buying them....
1- our farm. We started out with 20 acres of once upon a time, many decades before, a place that had been used to graze cattle. Prior to that had been used by an adjacent ranch to work with their ranch horses. It had been abandoned, allowed to regrow into a young woods for years and years to the point that all the buildings and fencing had rotted away and totally disappeared. Instead of buying a farm, we made our own.......buildings, pastures, gardens, rock walls, fences, the whole shebang.
2- our house. We bought the materials, but we did the building.
3- our food. 98% of our food comes from our own effort, one way or the other.
 
Shawn Klassen-Koop
gardener & author
Posts: 2016
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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- tools
- furniture
- pot holders
- dishes
- cutlery
 
Posts: 1444
Location: Fennville MI
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I'm somewhat inclined to say that the list of things you can't make for yourself is likely shorter  I'm not going to make my own steel, for example.  But if I have some steel, there is quite a list of things I can make for myself from it
 
Posts: 48
Location: Southeast Brazil
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A wheelbarrow. It can be made of wood but people say I am a skilled bamboo furniture maker, so I plan to make a bamboo wheelbarrow, its frame and basket. I guess It can be made of willow too.
I can make a giant list of bamboo things we can make ourselves.
 
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I guess there are a lot of things you can make yourself, this has been a good list so far. My top five are planters, compost, soap (you can make soap once a year and have enough), curtains (out of old bedsheets if you have a nice pattern you like), and fish food (if your fish are vegetarians you can grow duckweed and use it for about 1/2 of their total food intake)
 
She'll be back. I'm just gonna wait here. With this tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
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