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So much water.  RSS feed

 
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know, it's a blessing as much as it is a curse.

We're in East Texas. Forget about what you know about the rest of Texas. We're way more of the Louisiana swamps. Bald Cypress in the creeks n bottoms. All that stuff.

Anyway we got 5.5 acres after Harvey, it had 8 foot of standing water for a week. Had some soil hydrologist tell us that water isn't gonna penetrate the soil right for ~6 more months. But the land floods in parts every year due in part to poor logging practice about 20 years ago. Which also needs thinning now.

In the 5 acres of woods I'm trying to get a forestry mulcher to clear 3 acres of brush (thin tall trees that aren't doin much for the woods in any way) keeping almost all trees above 6" in diameter. And gettin a 30ft pole saw to open up the canopy to get light to the ground to help some grass come back n regulate soil moisture.

I'm planting probably a quarter acre in the back to Napier grass for deer bedding and hoping to dry out a bottom. I'm even considering planting rice to dry out ~2 acres and just mow it before seed sets.

I know a lot of us are trying to harvest as much water as possible but can yall give me any tips to dry some land out.
 
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Willow trees, cattails and other edge of the water type plants will suck up quite a lot of water and expel it to the air.
Your ideas are good ones too.

Check the height of those tall, thin trees, you may be able to sell those for Poles for Tipi (tepee) owners.
These usually need to be straight and 2-3 inches diameter with a 14-18 foot length to them.

Redhawk
 
Cody Haynes
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Oh it's really a mass of gnarly trees with little value to me. I understand the sentiment tho. But they just wind up as a mulch right where they are.

But we have gone through n flagged about 300 keepers, oaks, Cypress, honey locust.

Also on another forum they said to French drain to the creek. We already planned on damming it low as a reserve so I might go that way.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Those sound more like smoking wood :)

Be carful installing a drain to the creek you might add to or create a new problem.
I'm not saying don't install a drain, just plan it our carefully.

 
Cody Haynes
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yeah a lot of our land features are what logging left behind so I'm having to plan carefully. And think about if I wanna reverse it in the future.

But speakin of smoking wood we got access to the neighbors hickory thicket. An acre of hickory 3 inches in diameter and clearing n collecting them for smoking til a couple dozen specimen are left to thrive.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Sweet!  I love my hickory forest. 
 
Cody Haynes
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Lol I love hickory smoked bacon
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Indeed, we raise and butcher our own AGH pork. Have two full slabs in the freezer along with assorted other cuts right now.

If I can be of any more help with the water issue let me know and I am sure I can come up with some ideas, or I'll ask Mark Shepard for his thoughts.

Redhawk
 
pollinator
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Location: Quebec, Canada
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One idea, if you have access to equipment; it might make sense to dig some swales and mount the dirt to create berms.  Then you can plant on the berms which are now higher than the water table.

Also, it is better to plant trees that love water instead of the trees that love drought.

What ever method you use to "dry out" the land, just have a plan to deal with the drought years.  Even, rainy climates can get those drought years.

 
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