• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

Nuts as cash crop, and Home-Made Husker

 
pollinator
Posts: 940
Location: Stevensville, MT
29
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just read the article, "He Makes Money After 'Going Nuts,'" in Farm Show (Vol. 34, No. 6). Mark Shepard has a 100 acre farm in WI where he grows as many perennial crops as possible for his weather and soil conditions. So, in addition to nuts, he has lots of fruit and is getting into hard-cider fermentation. He is currently working on hazelnuts for biodiesel, which he uses for all of his powered farm equipment, (and also just to eat). He is also selecting varieties of pine nuts, Japanese walnuts (heart nuts), and pecans that can make it through the cold. He is working on reviving the American chestnut, and butternuts by working to recognize disease-resistant strains. He's crossing butternuts with Japanese walnuts to make a hybrid: butterhearts. He is also making his own equipment for husking and cleaning the nuts, which are very efficient, and he will be patenting and selling.

I like the idea of getting to harvest a perennial for generations like this that is a real feeder (good protein). And he is doing so well.
 
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sounds like a great article.  There was a thread about another article covering his farm a few weeks or months back.  Sounds like an interesting man and a very interesting set up.

Think we could convice Paul to try and interview him or invite him to the site?
 
Suzy Bean
pollinator
Posts: 940
Location: Stevensville, MT
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That would be awesome!
 
                    
Posts: 0
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
anyone have experience with dealing with  nut grubs?
 
                                  
Posts: 6
Location: North Germany
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yeah we should have a permaculture informed questioning round. Especially the money he needed for setting up would be interesting
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
318
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is a handy, back-saving way to harvest walnuts:
(Link to http://www.mitzenmacher.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/09/Walnuts_004.jpg)



Wouldn't be difficult to duplicate.
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
670
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
  We had a veterinarian who sold cattle testicles to a European deli. I guess those nuts were a cash crop for him .

    I'm going to have to check to see if squirrels are legally vermin where I live. If I'm unable to control squirrels then I won't grow many nuts. On the other hand if I'm allowed to capture squirrels then I guess I'm going to be serving up organic squirrel meat. I'm surrounded by forest that isn't sprayed with anything so this could be a renewable resource. There's also a good chance that raccoons would go after nuts but I suspect people will be more comfortable eating squirrels then they would be with raccoons.
 
Posts: 11
Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We eat raccoons in Detroit. Srsly.
 
Posts: 222
Location: Douglas County OR
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

hamtownfarms wrote:
We eat raccoons in Detroit. Srsly.


Huh, must be a new thing. Still, when I was living there (River Rouge) there was a butcher there that sold musk rat, for my cousins who were missing them after catching them around the Saginaw Bay, I suspect. 
 
Posts: 164
Location: North Carolina
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

dale hodgins wrote:I'm going to have to check to see if squirrels are legally vermin where I live. If I'm unable to control squirrels then I won't grow many nuts. On the other hand if I'm allowed to capture squirrels then I guess I'm going to be serving up organic squirrel meat. I'm surrounded by forest that isn't sprayed with anything so this could be a renewable resource. There's also a good chance that raccoons would go after nuts but I suspect people will be more comfortable eating squirrels then they would be with raccoons.



Raccoon has become quite a gourmet item, and fairly high priced.  Why not do both?

Red Cloud
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater podcast gob
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic