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Advice Needed About a Natural Fish Pond (No Electricity)  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 232
Location: Western Washington
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Hi everyone,

I'm looking for advice and input on some ponds that I want to put in. I've done some research but I'm very new to this topic. One of them will be pretty small (30 by 30, and of an undecided depth). The other could be half an acre or more. I've done some research and have read an article relating to this on mother earth news titled "DIY Natural Backyard Pond." I also read a thread here on permies called "Has anyone set up an aquaponics system which does not use electricity?" I'd link to both but my phone is being buggy.

I want to create a natural, productive environment in both. My aim is to not use electricity or pumps at all. I want to produce fish of some kind, and I'm not particular on what they are. My soil is a heavy silt clay and I have a very high water table (if I dig a foot down in a normal looking pasture I hit water). It's flat though I might acquire the hill above me.

These are my needs:

1. To use a natural setup that does not use pond liners (I've heard ducks can create a microfilm of biota because of their manure. I don't know how it's spelled but a friend called the process glaying).

2. To do this without any electricity, including solar or fancy pumps. Also either no windmills or windmills that are easy to build and maintain. Natural ponds and fish farms in ancient China, India, and Rome didn't have electricity, though perhaps they used a complex gravity system that I don't have resources for.

3. To choose productive elements (fish and plants) that are appropriate for my environment and that will be easy to feed and care for (no heating). I'm interested in crayfish because I love eating them and I'm open to Carp or anything else anyone can suggest. I don't know anything about growing plants for food in a pond, but I'm open to it. I'm also willing, of course, to support plants and animals that aren't directly productive, especially if they're an important part of the ecosystem I'm trying to create. I live in zone eight (western Washington) with about 70 inches of rain a year and hit dry summers. I live at the bottom of a valley which helps my water table to refill.

4. To be able to produce all of my own fish feed on site and/or in the pond itself.

Thanks for your feedback and ideas!
 
gardener
Posts: 856
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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The best advice I could give is look at any ponds you can find that are nearby, whether they be natural or man made.  
This will inform you as to the conditions a pond of your own might need.  Look at the flora and fauna.  See what's going
on in there!

1. If you have sufficient clay in your soil, you may not need to worry about "gleying", the clay will act as the seal itself.
  Here is a way to check for clay content: https://www.peakprosperity.com/wsidblog/87489/testing-your-soil-pond-site

2. Aquaponics without electricity? You mean like a natural pond or specifically for production of fish/plants?
Again looking at ponds near you will tell you what types of critters are going to live in yours.

3. See above
4. See above

To me, it sounds like you are wanting to make a natural pond that does things ponds tend to do, maybe you are over thinking this?
A pond is going to do what a pond is going to do, and the more you try to fit it to a certain mold it doesn't want to be in, the more you are fighting nature.
If anything, dig a hole by hand and see how it does. See if what happens after a good rain.  A journey of a thousand miles starts with one step.

 
James Landreth
pollinator
Posts: 232
Location: Western Washington
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Thank you. What I want to do is sustainably raise fish and plants in this pond, while also adding diversity to my land
 
Posts: 15
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bike fungi cooking
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Hi James,

We build a pond in Urban part of Paris, France with the intention of making it as natural and self-reliant as we could. It worked fine. After a huge amount of spontaneous wildlife moved in, frogs moved in for the spring this year altough our 3 shubunkin fish had 13 baby fish . So we are quite happy considering the peri-urban location of this garden.

My advice would be to go slowly, don't rush any new species, wait well until your pond looks super stable before adding fish. To get your pond started, add as many selected “good“ plants you can find in your area for your pond (ground growers, floaters, bank growers, tubers, ...) they will purify the water, oxygenate the water, shade the water, provide shelter and breeding ground, etc.. This is all very important if you want your pond to self-regulate. Also, find a pond that looks healthy and take some mud from it and put (a handful is enough) the mud in your pond. You will be adding lots of microorganisms and planktons your pond will need.

Finally, remember that we might think a pond is nice and self-regulating if it is clear watered, but that is not an obvious criteria, you might prefer it, but the pond (most of the time) doesn't care. Levels of sun penetrating the water, oxygen in the pond, nitrates in the water, etc are all elements that will increase amounts of algae her to balance it out again.

So keep watching your pond closely, go slow, understand what has changed, the water will react very quickly to anything new or changing in its “parameters“.

As for the aquaponics section, I'm no expert, although I understand that for most system you need a pump to push the water through your plant growing system. But you might be able to set up a floating raft system for plants in you bigger pond if you like with certain edible productive plants. Check out this link that could be of some help


Cheers
 
James Landreth
pollinator
Posts: 232
Location: Western Washington
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The video is good, and I'm sure I can learn from it. However, I'm trying to oxygenate my pond without electricity, including the solar pump that he's using. I'm hoping plants could perhaps accomplish this, but I'm not sure how to go about it (do I need a bigger pond? What density of plants do I need? Etc)
 
Lennan Bate
Posts: 15
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bike fungi cooking
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In this system, Geoff is using a solar pump to oxygenate the water for a couple of reasons. Firstly this pond is a productive fish pond so he want's to get as many fish as he can, oxygen being important to maintain a good yield year round. Then he uses the pump to create a high oxygen zone in wish fish are accustomed to visiting so he can harvest them more easily.

Then of course, plants will produce oxygen in the water but if its too sunny/hot, they will be using the oxygen from the water at night. So if you wanna maintain a good level of oxygen in your pond without any pump, be sure to shade your pond. On our small pond, we had a trellis going over it. We could grow annual crops over it during the summer which shaded the pond and kept the water at an acceptable temperature (thus keeping oxygen level to an okay level), it was esthetical, productive and it increased the protection for the fish regarding birds that could catch them.

Again, the way you do it will depend of your situation. The temperature of where you are, the amount of water, if you have shallow areas that could create flow in the water (through hot/cold water flows), if you have deeper areas that are more stable for the fish to be in (oxygen and temperature) the number of plants your adding and number of fish you have.
Spend a year observing, it will take time for your pond to really stabilise and during that time you'll be able to observe the changes and fluctuations depending on the temperature outside and inside the pond, sun exposure, etc.. From those observations, make your assessments and you'll find your own solutions.
Designing is a journey, the more you stay aware and observant, the more your system will benefit from your learning and reflections.

Oh and for the number of plants I would say go for it! They will develop and the fish might eat some of them so you'll also figure out what works for you.
 
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