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What is the best way to stabilize a muddy area  RSS feed

 
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My Property is getting super muddy, just got my van stuck. It periodically gets really muddy in the spring. I'm interested in stabilizing the soil a bit in the area around where I drive and park the cars. The soil is a very saturated loam / clay that just slides all around. I'm wondering if anyone has recommendations on the best way to do this. Wood chips, Crushed Stone, Geo textural fabric, Permeable Pavers?
 
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Gravel might help. We have really wet soils here, but where the gravel driveway is, or where the soil is really gravely (I have gravelly loam soil, and some areas are like 40% gravel!), the ground does not get soft and mushy, while right next to it, the ground is so soft that a car would get stuck in the mud.

But, that's the only bit of knowledge i have. Hopefully someone else will chime in with more expert knowledge!

Also, you might find this thread useful: https://permies.com/t/53370/DIY-Dirt-Road-maintenance-improvement
 
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I don't know if it is available where you live though, "roadbase" is caliche that is basically fine crushed limestone.  When it dries it forms a hard surface.

When you have it delivered, the driver can stagger the dumps so it will be able to be spread out evenly over the area.
 
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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This is an area of expertise for myself.
Basically if you study road building you will see what to do.

I recommend in Australia the following=
Geo fabric is great in a lot of cases but it not low priced
First layer of rock should be 40mm crushed rock, with no fines in it. Crushed rock with fines is called Crushed rock 40mm minus.
When its settled a bit , say 12 months add another layer of 20mm minus, crushed rock and out a roller or wackier over it.
This should be perfect.
A couple of extra tips;
Any decent truck driver should be able to spread the rock by fitting chains to the tailgate to limit how far the tail gate opens, then as he lifts the tipper and reverses backwards the rock will spread out and he has a solid surface to travel over.
If he lifts the load whilst sitting on sloppy mud, he may get bogged.

Also, if you are building  anything, I suggest you get the 40mm laid first, then have the builders drive over it to attend to the construction and they will help compact it, not get bogged on the site and they will love you.
Then when its finished spread the 20mm.

The bigger rock will settle into the mud and create a stable base for the 20mm minus.
If you apply the 20mm minus first the mud and water will come through it and become a boggy mess again.
 
John C Daley
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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The next thing is to create drains around the area to divert surface water away from the edges and prevent water infiltration to the base level of the area you are working on.
It does not need to be done at the start, unless its very wet in your area.
 
Dereck Downey
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John C Daley wrote:This is an area of expertise for myself.
Basically if you study road building you will see what to do.

I recommend in Australia the following=
Geo fabric is great in a lot of cases but it not low priced
First layer of rock should be 40mm crushed rock, with no fines in it. Crushed rock with fines is called Crushed rock 40mm minus.
When its settled a bit , say 12 months add another layer of 20mm minus, crushed rock and out a roller or wackier over it.
This should be perfect.
A couple of extra tips;
Any decent truck driver should be able to spread the rock by fitting chains to the tailgate to limit how far the tail gate opens, then as he lifts the tipper and reverses backwards the rock will spread out and he has a solid surface to travel over.
If he lifts the load whilst sitting on sloppy mud, he may get bogged.

Also, if you are building  anything, I suggest you get the 40mm laid first, then have the builders drive over it to attend to the construction and they will help compact it, not get bogged on the site and they will love you.
Then when its finished spread the 20mm.

The bigger rock will settle into the mud and create a stable base for the 20mm minus.
If you apply the 20mm minus first the mud and water will come through it and become a boggy mess again.



I't a fairy small area, maybe 600 square feet in the top corner of the property where I park the car. As well as the entrance area where you pull the car in. The reverse dump may work, but it might clip some of the trees toward the entrance. it's also possible that I borrow someones tractor ( with a bucket ) and use that to spread the stone. All else fails can do it with a wheelbarrow. I'm also fascinated with this Geo Fabric but maybe that's overkill, would rather spend a little extra and do it right  . . .
 
John C Daley
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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40mm material is hard to move, its lumpy. A grader blade may work.
Since the area is at the top of the property, it sounds like a drain uphill may also help a lot.
 
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First thing you have to do is get the water out of it. Then you dry it out. Take your sod off first six inches don't use this for fill. Then take your dirt out mix it 5050 with rock put it back in so it's not the lowest spot create a path for the water to go where you want it. Put your sod back on.
 
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