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A Cliff or Wall in the ascent?  RSS feed

 
gardener
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I've been working on making bite sized ladder wrungs si the ascent to sustainability is easier, but I have run into a point that is either a wall or a cliff, but I don't like it.

You see, there's lots of little things you can change in your life, but to do things like invest in an rmh, insulation, wood pile, or build a food forest that won't get cut in 3 years, etc. You need land that your not renting or is part of an intentionally sustainable community. I know there's a quick RMH, but that's not for indoors in a rental. Buying is a huge investment.  Joining a community is a huge investment.  Both take time,  a change in habits, and money. Too much taken on at once can make one regress or burnout, but it's almost unavoidable that you will have to take this step, if you aren't there already, and face a temporary regression until your habits are reestablished in your new living environment, and then you can continue to progress from there.  Does that make sense?

The only other option, from what I can see is being really close with someone already on the journey and hanging out at their place a lot to get used to that type of life.
 
gardener
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Buying is a huge investment.

 I'm at the tail end of this part of things, and the cost has been high, not just in terms of cash.  I'm presently just started a mental health LOA from work which was driving me crazy, or at least very stressed, depressed, and frustrated.  I struggled with the same place where you seem to be for years, and had other issues (like the search for the 'perfect' place) that were more mental/emotional obstacles than anything.  I'm not sure that I can be more help, but to simply focus on your goals, no matter how difficult or far off they seem.  Sometimes it's necessary to take the big leap, Amit.  From what I read, you have a strong head on your shoulders, and, in my opinion, are more than a match for the tasks ahead.
 
pollinator
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Sadly today it is called Paralysis by Analysis

In farming, it is rampant. It has come down to where EVERYTHING is a science and people feel that if they do not buy land with TRC soil, on a southwest slope with glacial till soil, with southern aspect, with swales descending down on a keyline contour with pond, it just plain is not worth buying. I am being dramatic here to make a point. None of this stuff is bad, but at the same time how did our forefathers get by?

They settled where they could and made the best of it.

Before you even start, develop a comprehensive farm plan, and be sure to write down your goals. From there, pick ONE big project per year and start and complete it. If you can do numerous other smaller project great, but just focus on one big project and after just a few years, a person would be amazed at what transpires. When you get discouraged, go back and read the goals you first had and realize how many have been accomplished in only a few years. That will encourage you.


 
Amit Enventres
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"I'm at the tail end of this part of things, and the cost has been high, not just in terms of cash.  I'm presently just started a mental health LOA from work which was driving me crazy, or at least very stressed, depressed, and frustrated.  I struggled with the same place where you seem to be for years, and had other issues (like the search for the 'perfect' place) that were more mental/emotional obstacles than anything.  I'm not sure that I can be more help, but to simply focus on your goals, no matter how difficult or far off they seem.  Sometimes it's necessary to take the big leap, Amit.  From what I read, you have a strong head on your shoulders, and, in my opinion, are more than a match for the tasks ahead. "

Yes. I think that describes it. Thanks for the compliment.  My goal is to not just get myself down to zero,  but help others do that too. However we can help others through that cliff is probably very important since once the cliff is paved, it's easier to navigate.  I guess that is one of the things we do here at Permies.  Thanks!
 
gardener
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"when their ships come in, too many people are at the train station"

the place where you can be the most help
may not be obvious to you when your focus is too narrow

maybe a refocus is needed
rather than aiming at "goals", look for systems
to build skills for when that lucky break appears.
"lucky breaks" happen often but only those prepared can take advantage of them

computer skills  -
organizing or management experience -
heavy equipment operation -
public speaking experience -
a  "rolodex" of different contacts -
etc
will all make "lucky breaks" more frequent
you can never tell who might come up to you at a community event where you're doing something.........








 
Amit Enventres
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Duane, that's similar in process as holistic management where you constantly look at your resources innovatively and evaluate your decisions to meet your end goals. Your resources include the skills you are building, according to both models. And yes, you never know when a random job or event will provide a super important skill in the future.
 
pollinator
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Amit Enventres wrote:
My goal is to not just get myself down to zero,  but help others do that too. However we can help others through that cliff is probably very important since once the cliff is paved, it's easier to navigate.  I guess that is one of the things we do here at Permies.  Thanks!



Maybe you can build experience and skills by helping others with their efforts, and at the same time expose yourself to opportunities and networks along the way.
In my mind, I see your cliff/wall like the wall in an obstacle course, where the whole team needs to get over, and you can help by lifting people up from the bottom, and you can pull people up from the top.

From the bottom, you can help lots of people get over the wall without going over it yourself...
If you're at the bottom, once there are some at the top that you helped up there, there are more chances they are going to reach down to pull you up.

Any chance you are able to build your skills, take it!
In college, I wanted to take a blacksmithing course, but it was full, so instead I took a foundry course (in the same shop, so I "eavesdropped")...next year, full again, so I took machine shop instead, and also learned welding (also showed up to blacksmithing to see if anyone dropped the class)...
Next year, full again. Called the instructor and went to visit him at his shop. As soon as I entered, he recognized me and remembered my previous attempts to be in his class. We talked about what I had done, and he knew I was determined and he made a place for me.
By then, I knew how to weld and run machines, so while the other students were struggling with small welding jobs and drilling holes... I breezed through it all, and got more time at the forge!

By studying related work, showing up/networking, I not only made my place in that class, but I also made it better than it would have been that first year if I had taken it then.
 
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