• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • paul wheaton
  • Devaka Cooray
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mark Tudor
  • Pearl Sutton

Wanting to Share a Homestead in the Missouri Ozarks  RSS feed

 
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey there, Permies! I'm a single, 37-year-old fellow here who recently acquired 24 acres in the Missouri Ozarks. It's a beautiful place, and all that is missing is some other great folks who share the dream of wanting a permaculture-based homestead. I prefer to foster a drug-free, alcohol-free, and Christian environment as well if that makes any difference in your considerations. Let me know if you have any interest in such an endeavor! God bless!
IMG_3629.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_3629.jpg]
A1E720CB-99B1-4B26-9755-12A52E1CA66D.jpg
[Thumbnail for A1E720CB-99B1-4B26-9755-12A52E1CA66D.jpg]
IMG_3702.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_3702.jpg]
 
gardener
Posts: 1208
Location: SW Missouri
283
books building cat chicken food preservation fungi goat homestead cooking ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like a lovely place! Hope you find people you like soon!
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you very much, Pearl! How is it going over at your place? Are you having to water as much as I am?
 
Posts: 171
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You have a beautiful looking homestead!!!
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's very kind of you to say. Thank you! I moved here on a bit of whim just because I randomly found this place on the Internet and liked it that much. I do enjoy living here and love to have visitors.
 
J Anders
Posts: 171
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nathan May wrote:That's very kind of you to say. Thank you! I moved here on a bit of whim just because I randomly found this place on the Internet and liked it that much. I do enjoy living here and love to have visitors.



I assume you're replying to me?

Yes... I've worked there for 3 months several years ago, in NW AR. Been there on two vacations so far. Beautiful area. I live a few hundred miles straight north.
 
J Anders
Posts: 171
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nathan- What do you know about working remotely? I noticed in another post that you had that you work on the web. I have a book coming about white hat hacking. Looking into doing that for money- apparently it can be done anywhere and from the little that I read of the book "Hacking the Hacker" when I picked it up at Barnes & Noble it is also very easy. I love research and learning about new things on the internet so thought maybe it'd be a good challenge. I'm also hard of hearing so most normal jobs are a pain in the posterior for me. Mooseage me if you want... (If that's what they call it around here.) Thank you!
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 1208
Location: SW Missouri
283
books building cat chicken food preservation fungi goat homestead cooking ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Nathan!
Let me try this again, lost a well written reply in a computer crash yesterday. I hit "submit" and blue screened.

Yeah, the dry is intense here too. I put out water for the birds, deer and bunnies yesterday, then put a bowl of water in the barn for the snakes and wasps who live in there, everybody's thirsty. Today I mowed in a seasonal pond that was there when I bought the place, it's dry enough that I could not get stuck in it. It needed mowing, I meant to do it last winter, then my tractor got stolen and I didn't have a way to do it before it got wet again. So making use of the weather. Even drought is an opportunity! First time I have seen the dirt levels in it, mowed out 4 foot tall buckbrush and sericea lespedeza (the kind my neighbor hates, ruins his hay) with a riding mower (my current tractor has a flat tire) which HATES being used as a brushcutter. It did amazingly well! But I can see that the pond was built by someone who just put a pond there without looking at water flow, I'll see if I can fix that at some point, the pond gets 30-40 % of the water going by, it's in the wrong place. There's a fair amount of flow pattern, but it just goes past each side.

This area is interesting, we are in a bubble, we don't seem to get bad storms, ice or tornadoes that hit 10 miles away in all directions, but when it's dry, we watch the rain go past too. I have a picture I kept off the local weather radar, there's rain all around us, but at the county lines it stops. Really weird :)

Your place is lovely! I hope you find people to play with you soon!
I curtsy nicely at you :)
Pearl
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:That's very kind of you to say. Thank you! I moved here on a bit of whim just because I randomly found this place on the Internet and liked it that much. I do enjoy living here and love to have visitors.



I assume you're replying to me?

Yes... I've worked there for 3 months several years ago, in NW AR. Been there on two vacations so far. Beautiful area. I live a few hundred miles straight north.



Well, feel free to stay here if you ever come back down this way. How are things going up your way?
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:Hey Nathan!
Let me try this again, lost a well written reply in a computer crash yesterday. I hit "submit" and blue screened.

Yeah, the dry is intense here too. I put out water for the birds, deer and bunnies yesterday, then put a bowl of water in the barn for the snakes and wasps who live in there, everybody's thirsty. Today I mowed in a seasonal pond that was there when I bought the place, it's dry enough that I could not get stuck in it. It needed mowing, I meant to do it last winter, then my tractor got stolen and I didn't have a way to do it before it got wet again. So making use of the weather. Even drought is an opportunity! First time I have seen the dirt levels in it, mowed out 4 foot tall buckbrush and sericea lespedeza (the kind my neighbor hates, ruins his hay) with a riding mower (my current tractor has a flat tire) which HATES being used as a brushcutter. It did amazingly well! But I can see that the pond was built by someone who just put a pond there without looking at water flow, I'll see if I can fix that at some point, the pond gets 30-40 % of the water going by, it's in the wrong place. There's a fair amount of flow pattern, but it just goes past each side.

This area is interesting, we are in a bubble, we don't seem to get bad storms, ice or tornadoes that hit 10 miles away in all directions, but when it's dry, we watch the rain go past too. I have a picture I kept off the local weather radar, there's rain all around us, but at the county lines it stops. Really weird :)

Your place is lovely! I hope you find people to play with you soon!
I curtsy nicely at you :)
Pearl



Sorry to hear about your computer crash there! That is the worst. Thank you for making the double effort to write back. It sounds like you are quite dry there also. It seems like there is usually enough rain that even 30-40% flow would fill up your pond. I picked a bad year here to build a pond and to plant a lot of plants. Thankfully most of the plants have survived, and I look forward to seeing the pond when it is completely full.

I share your "bubble" theory. I have watched storms go around me for over a year. It's gotten quite frustrating. Big storm lines will break just before me, go around me, and then come back together afterwards.

It sounds like you have a lovely place as well, Pearl. It sounds like all creatures big and small and all plants big and small are in good care there!

A bow [edited] in return! :)
 
J Anders
Posts: 171
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nathan May wrote:

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:That's very kind of you to say. Thank you! I moved here on a bit of whim just because I randomly found this place on the Internet and liked it that much. I do enjoy living here and love to have visitors.



I assume you're replying to me?

Yes... I've worked there for 3 months several years ago, in NW AR. Been there on two vacations so far. Beautiful area. I live a few hundred miles straight north.



Well, feel free to stay here if you ever come back down this way. How are things going up your way?



Well, not too far from me is the "Home of Black Soil" so the growing is good and the crops grow well without amendments... it's been dry here for awhile but that's nothing new this time of year. This year, I intentionally  planted my garden on 30" spacing because the city changed their water billing and I wasn't interested in paying $100/ month for water.  So far I've never watered and it's growing quite well.

Of course... the negative parts is the fact that they spray everything around here, I have crop dusters flying over my house every day for several weeks every summer, and I consider myself lucky to have cabbage wasps and other beneficial predators in my garden. Just as a FYI... growing kale year round will keep cabbage wasps in business.
 
J Anders
Posts: 171
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nathan May wrote:
A curtsy in return! :)



Shouldn't that be a BOW in return? Last time I checked you're not a girl. Girls curtsy, Men bow.
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:
A curtsy in return! :)



Shouldn't that be a BOW in return? Last time I checked you're not a girl. Girls curtsy, Men bow.



There's a reason I live alone in the middle of nowhere. LOL. I've neither curtsied nor bowed.
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:That's very kind of you to say. Thank you! I moved here on a bit of whim just because I randomly found this place on the Internet and liked it that much. I do enjoy living here and love to have visitors.



I assume you're replying to me?

Yes... I've worked there for 3 months several years ago, in NW AR. Been there on two vacations so far. Beautiful area. I live a few hundred miles straight north.



Well, feel free to stay here if you ever come back down this way. How are things going up your way?



Well, not too far from me is the "Home of Black Soil" so the growing is good and the crops grow well without amendments... it's been dry here for awhile but that's nothing new this time of year. This year, I intentionally  planted my garden on 30" spacing because the city changed their water billing and I wasn't interested in paying $100/ month for water.  So far I've never watered and it's growing quite well.

Of course... the negative parts is the fact that they spray everything around here, I have crop dusters flying over my house every day for several weeks every summer, and I consider myself lucky to have cabbage wasps and other beneficial predators in my garden. Just as a FYI... growing kale year round will keep cabbage wasps in business.



That's great that you are able to keep up your garden in spite of the challenges. This is the first year that i have tried kale. I've barely gotten to eat any, because those and the brassicas are prime target for everything around here. I think I shall try growing them under a screen next year. Do you think that would work?
 
J Anders
Posts: 171
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nathan May wrote:That's great that you are able to keep up your garden in spite of the challenges. This is the first year that i have tried kale. I've barely gotten to eat any, because those and the brassicas are prime target for everything around here. I think I shall try growing them under a screen next year. Do you think that would work?



I would personally [based on my experiences] keep it going through the winter until you find that you're attracting the cabbage wasps... then they will gobble up those caterpillars that destroy it. My first year was horrible... I must have gotten cabbage wasps late that year, and then I had a 30' row of kale that fall, and then I harvested it for seed the next summer in about July. It takes an amazingly long time to go to seed- can be eaten through June. I have some this year that I don't know if it'll go to seed until next year, no sign of seeds this year, even though I planted it late last fall and a lot of it came back. Since that first year I've had NO problems what so ever with brassicas... other than cabbage heads splitting. I have 3 split heads in the garden that are already growing new heads that are nearly as big as the original split heads! But... since that first year I've had brassicas growing constantly in my garden and everyone is happy. However, I have gotten stung by a wasp twice in the last two weeks, first one was a paper wasp and I got rid of their nest which was  in a hole in my vinyl siding corner RIGHT next to the back door, and the other nest is somewhere in the yard in the same vicinity. Aggravating. I don't normally kill wasps... just leave me alone is all I ask.

If you're not desperate to eat it and you have enough ground to play with it's fun to let everything complete their natural cycles. I have also grown beets and spinach to seed as well.
 
Posts: 137
Location: SW Ohio
18
chicken duck fish forest garden fungi cooking tiny house trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
BTW I'm totally over myself so even if our other conversation goes nowhere, I'm probably gonna want to at least pay you a visit sometime, zero awkwardness other than my inherent social awkwardness. I sleep in a tent in my parents yard so I'm totally cool with sleeping in a tent in some other person's yard who's a cool permie who will do bible study with me.
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:That's great that you are able to keep up your garden in spite of the challenges. This is the first year that i have tried kale. I've barely gotten to eat any, because those and the brassicas are prime target for everything around here. I think I shall try growing them under a screen next year. Do you think that would work?



I would personally [based on my experiences] keep it going through the winter until you find that you're attracting the cabbage wasps... then they will gobble up those caterpillars that destroy it. My first year was horrible... I must have gotten cabbage wasps late that year, and then I had a 30' row of kale that fall, and then I harvested it for seed the next summer in about July. It takes an amazingly long time to go to seed- can be eaten through June. I have some this year that I don't know if it'll go to seed until next year, no sign of seeds this year, even though I planted it late last fall and a lot of it came back. Since that first year I've had NO problems what so ever with brassicas... other than cabbage heads splitting. I have 3 split heads in the garden that are already growing new heads that are nearly as big as the original split heads! But... since that first year I've had brassicas growing constantly in my garden and everyone is happy. However, I have gotten stung by a wasp twice in the last two weeks, first one was a paper wasp and I got rid of their nest which was  in a hole in my vinyl siding corner RIGHT next to the back door, and the other nest is somewhere in the yard in the same vicinity. Aggravating. I don't normally kill wasps... just leave me alone is all I ask.

If you're not desperate to eat it and you have enough ground to play with it's fun to let everything complete their natural cycles. I have also grown beets and spinach to seed as well.



I greatly appreciate this advice, J Anders. I feel like I haven't quite become the magnet for beneficial insects just yet, but it helps me to know that it might take more than a year for this to happen. I even put up one of those little beneficial insect houses, but it hasn't had much activity. I'll keep holding out hope for them to come by!
 
Nate Mack
Posts: 27
Location: SW Missouri
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sarah Koster wrote:BTW I'm totally over myself so even if our other conversation goes nowhere, I'm probably gonna want to at least pay you a visit sometime, zero awkwardness other than my inherent social awkwardness. I sleep in a tent in my parents yard so I'm totally cool with sleeping in a tent in some other person's yard who's a cool permie who will do bible study with me.



I'm honored that you would want to come and check out the place. Adding a Bible study to that would make it very pleasant indeed!
 
J Anders
Posts: 171
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Nathan May wrote:

J Anders wrote:

Nathan May wrote:That's great that you are able to keep up your garden in spite of the challenges. This is the first year that i have tried kale. I've barely gotten to eat any, because those and the brassicas are prime target for everything around here. I think I shall try growing them under a screen next year. Do you think that would work?



I would personally [based on my experiences] keep it going through the winter until you find that you're attracting the cabbage wasps... then they will gobble up those caterpillars that destroy it. My first year was horrible... I must have gotten cabbage wasps late that year, and then I had a 30' row of kale that fall, and then I harvested it for seed the next summer in about July. It takes an amazingly long time to go to seed- can be eaten through June. I have some this year that I don't know if it'll go to seed until next year, no sign of seeds this year, even though I planted it late last fall and a lot of it came back. Since that first year I've had NO problems what so ever with brassicas... other than cabbage heads splitting. I have 3 split heads in the garden that are already growing new heads that are nearly as big as the original split heads! But... since that first year I've had brassicas growing constantly in my garden and everyone is happy. However, I have gotten stung by a wasp twice in the last two weeks, first one was a paper wasp and I got rid of their nest which was  in a hole in my vinyl siding corner RIGHT next to the back door, and the other nest is somewhere in the yard in the same vicinity. Aggravating. I don't normally kill wasps... just leave me alone is all I ask.

If you're not desperate to eat it and you have enough ground to play with it's fun to let everything complete their natural cycles. I have also grown beets and spinach to seed as well.



I greatly appreciate this advice, J Anders. I feel like I haven't quite become the magnet for beneficial insects just yet, but it helps me to know that it might take more than a year for this to happen. I even put up one of those little beneficial insect houses, but it hasn't had much activity. I'll keep holding out hope for them to come by!



I missed this post. Also see other threads about putting tin cans on 3' stakes to give the wasps homes to live in. On another note, after 4 years of gardening, I didn't get hit with blight on my tomatoes until they were practically done anyway. First couple years I got blight real early. Gardening is really a long-term project and like I said, if you want to keep those cabbage wasps around (or any other beneficial) keep them fed as long as they're active.
 
Posts: 5
Location: Alabama
food preservation rabbit woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like a lovely homestead you have! May  the Lord send you just the people you need to help it thrive and if you must do it alone may He give you the strength to keep it up! I'm always so blessed to see others Christians striving to live the homesteading type of life!
 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow this is very interesting

Me and my husband moved to Missouri about four years ago with the intend on building our own homestead/off grid home. But the second we got here we learned what it means to buy land that is part of a HOA oops! But man we got a lot done in a few months before they threatened legal action.

Then we tried to just buy/mortgage a small farm (3 acres) because we figured it would be easier to work on a piece of land that already has a house/well/septic but that sale fell through when it got apprised for less then it's sale price and the seller refused to lower. Can't find another house with that much land near the cities like that one.

Now we're back to square one and looking at lands in other states again. I got lots of phone calls to make to some counties once the weekend is over. We still have all that down payment money/savings.

It's just me and the husband and the little one. We're "dwarves" so we liking digging into the ground and using the stones to make walls. It's amazing how much you can get done with a gas powered jack hammer. We just wanna exit the rat race and live away from people, gaining money making furniture and such.
 
Always look on the bright side of life. At least this ad is really tiny:
Intrinsic: An Agriculture of Altered Chaos
https://permies.com/t/95922/Intrinsic-Agriculture-Altered-Chaos
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!