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I present the PermaMeliponicultura and the Oscar Perone hive of automatic harvest  RSS feed

 
Posts: 17
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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I am pleased to present the PermaMeliponiculture, a technique that I have developed to work with meliponas and trigonas, applying to Meliponiculture, the concepts and philosophy of PermApicultura.

I present in this video the hive Oscar Perone, special to make PermaMeliponicultura, that allows to harvest and commercialize the honey of meliponas and trigonas, WITHOUT TOUCHING FOR NOTHING.

I am available for free to change ideas or information about PermaMeliponicultura.



Oscar Perone
 
pollinator
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Location: Australia, Canberra
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Nice, double wall insulated hive for stingless bees.

Is there any way to reduce the plastic in the hive.

Are you actually Oscar Perone who is the inventor of Permapiculture?
 
Gurkan Yeniceri
pollinator
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I didn't know what Meliponiculture is so I Googled it.

Here is a PDF from FAO

http://www.fao.org/docrep/pdf/012/i0842e/i0842e07.pdf
 
Oscar Perone
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Gurkan Yeniceri wrote:Nice, double wall insulated hive for stingless bees.

Is there any way to reduce the plastic in the hive.

Are you actually Oscar Perone who is the inventor of Permapiculture?



Yes Mr. Gurcan Yeniceri, I am the conceptualist of the PermApiculture, and I am at your disposal dear colleague from Australia.

I will try to follow your suggestion, and see how to use less plastic.

Thanks for leaving your kind comment.
 
Oscar Perone
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Gurkan Yeniceri wrote:I didn't know what Meliponiculture is so I Googled it.

Here is a PDF from FAO

http://www.fao.org/docrep/pdf/012/i0842e/i0842e07.pdf



PermaMeliponicultura, Mr. Gurkan Yeniceri, is what I have created and that I explain in my video that I invite you to watch with great attention, the part in which I explain this, has subtitles in English and Portuguese.

Since I am from a distant country in South America, they are slow to show in Google what we do :-)

Thank you very much for your kind comment.
 
Oscar Perone
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Welcome to permies, Oscar!

I merged your two threads together and deleted the duplicate post. On permies we have the spiffy feature of having one thread show up in multiple forums. THis thread is now in both Pollinators and Honey Bees forums.

If you ever need a thread to show up in more than one forum, just click the button on the first post and tell us which forums you'd like it added to.

Is there any way you could enable translation on your video? Not all of us speak Spanish....

Thank you!



Mrs. Nicole Alderman, in the second part of my video, in which I make comments and give explanations about my hive, has subtitles in English and Portuguese.

Thank you very much for your kind comment.
 
Gurkan Yeniceri
pollinator
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I am honoured to talk to you Mr Perone. You taught us a lot about the permapiculture and I have probably 100+ questions to ask but not now :-)
 
Oscar Perone
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Gurkan Yeniceri wrote:I am honoured to talk to you Mr Perone. You taught us a lot about the permapiculture and I have probably 100+ questions to ask but not now :-)



I remain at your disposal colleague Mr. Gurkan Yaneri, when you like we talk about bees which is what we like to do to beekeepers around the world :-)
 
pollinator
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Bees? Did someone say bees? You have my attention already. Can't watch the video from home but will do that soon. Yo habla espanol & bee enough to like what the title implies!!! Welcome to Permies.
 
Oscar Perone
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Mike Barkley wrote:Bees? Did someone say bees? You have my attention already. Can't watch the video from home but will do that soon. Yo habla espanol & bee enough to like what the title implies!!! Welcome to Permies.


Thank you very much Mr. Mike Barkley,  for welcoming me and treating me all with such kindness an affectionate greeting from Argentina.

I apologize for the flaws in the language that my messages might have, is that I use software translation.
 
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I have two questions...

First, is this little hive a "rational hive" that permits easy splitting of an existing hive?  Second, can these stingless bees be kept beyond the 30th parallel?  Or are they strictly a tropical species?
 
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Hola señor Perone!!

Un gran gusto leerlo en Permies, saludos desde Colombia.

¿Podría porfavor explicar con más detalle como es el mecanismo de cosecha automática?

Otra pregrunta:

¿Por que la divisón de la colmena puede afectar a las meliponas?

Muchas gracias!

______________

Hi Mr Perone

Im glad to read you at Permies. Hi from Colombia!

Can you please explaian with more detail how the automatic harvest system works?

Why the division of the hive is bad to the bees?

Thank you so much!
 
Oscar Perone
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Alejandro Ramirez wrote:Hola señor Perone!!

Un gran gusto leerlo en Permies, saludos desde Colombia.

¿Podría porfavor explicar con más detalle como es el mecanismo de cosecha automática?

Otra pregrunta:

¿Por que la divisón de la colmena puede afectar a las meliponas?

Muchas gracias!

______________

Hi Mr Perone

Im glad to read you at Permies. Hi from Colombia!

Can you please explaian with more detail how the automatic harvest system works?

Why the division of the hive is bad to the bees?

Thank you so much!



Hello Mr Alejandro Ramirez, thanks for writing me.

Those triangular containers of acetate that you will see in the video, will be filled by the meliponas or trigonas with their amphoras or pots of honey.

To harvest, you simply remove those transparent containers, place a pretty label, and market them as they are.

I suggest that you use the following sales argument:

This natural product, which comes to you from an environment without poisoning, the last living being that touched it, was a melipona.

Watch a meliponicultor work with their hives with meliponas or trigonas, and if he is harvesting honey, break everything, honey spills everywhere, make a mess, that meliponas will cost a lot of effort to repair.
And if he is doing divisions, you will see them break the involucre, a work of art that these wonderful little bees do, which will surely cost them to repair, without counting in both cases, with the intense, deep stress that causes them to meliponas and trigonas that are invaded, crushed, and in any way abused.

It is a law of nature that the living being that is stressed, whatever the cause of that stress, opens the doors to invade it because invariably, it loses the ability of its immune system to function properly.

That is one of the most powerful reasons why in PermApiculture, as in PermaMeliponiculture, we open our hives, ONLY to harvest, and this, only when we make sure that it is going to be left to that population, reserves IN EXCESS of those that keep with so much effort.

Sorry for the language errors that may be in my message, I am translating by software.
 
Oscar Perone
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Creighton Samuiels wrote:I have two questions...

First, is this little hive a "rational hive" that permits easy splitting of an existing hive?  Second, can these stingless bees be kept beyond the 30th parallel?  Or are they strictly a tropical species?



Hi Mr Creighton Samuiels, thanks for writing me.

This hive is designed to apply the technique of Non-Doing that is PermaMeliponiculture.

We do not divide our hives by considering them harmful to our bees, nor do we touch the nest NEVER, for the same reasons.

That is the reason why the nest is contained in a single piece that is indivisible, because for us the nest is untouchable, sacred.


We do not increase or reduce the size of the hive because it has a golden ratio that benefits the population that inhabits it and thus we maintain it throughout the year.


In addition we do not change the size of the hive, so that the bees are encouraged to swarm, and then fulfill the real reason for the existence of this innovative hive:

Collaborate with the increase of populations of meliponas and trigonas, trying to collaborate in the task of saving them, because they are disappearing, unfortunately for the environments they inhabit.

These bees do not adapt to the cold that is beyond the paraleo 30 in both hemispheres.

They inhabit and fulfill their great task of pollination, only in tropical and subtropical zones.

Sorry for the language errors that may be in my message, I am translating by software.
 
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Hi Mr Oscar Perone,

I'd like to clarify a few of points:
1. What you have said, is that you do *not* divide the hive, but rather you wait for the bees themselves to decide to swarm and then make sure there are more of your tiny homes empty in the area in the hopes that the bees will decide to move in?
2. If you do have a hive of bees, do you ever move it?  Moving established hives is a big problem that is stressing the bees in North America. That said, if you feel the bees you are working with are endangered, do you feel that occasionally moving a young hive in an effort to re-establish the bees in an area being rehabilitated can be done successfully?
3. Do the bees put *all* their honey in the acetate containers, or do they keep some in the nest area? How can someone be sure they do not remove too many of the containers for the health of the colony?

Thank you for doing the work to preserve pollinators. I do not live within the territory for the bees you have designed for, but there are native bees in my areas, and ensuring that they have areas suitable for nesting is important. I don't know if we have any that would appreciate your nest, but it's still interesting to learn about.
 
Oscar Perone
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Jay Angler wrote:Hi Mr Oscar Perone,

I'd like to clarify a few of points:
1. What you have said, is that you do *not* divide the hive, but rather you wait for the bees themselves to decide to swarm and then make sure there are more of your tiny homes empty in the area in the hopes that the bees will decide to move in?
2. If you do have a hive of bees, do you ever move it?  Moving established hives is a big problem that is stressing the bees in North America. That said, if you feel the bees you are working with are endangered, do you feel that occasionally moving a young hive in an effort to re-establish the bees in an area being rehabilitated can be done successfully?
3. Do the bees put *all* their honey in the acetate containers, or do they keep some in the nest area? How can someone be sure they do not remove too many of the containers for the health of the colony?

Thank you for doing the work to preserve pollinators. I do not live within the territory for the bees you have designed for, but there are native bees in my areas, and ensuring that they have areas suitable for nesting is important. I don't know if we have any that would appreciate your nest, but it's still interesting to learn about.



Hi Mr. Jay Angler.

1. The meliponas or trigonas, do not swarm, they move to a new hollow little by little, the workers of the hive mother, look for a hollow, and then they begin to take the necessary thing to go changing little by little.

This process of moving, in which the workers are collaborating with what the new colony needs, honey, pollen, propolis, etc. it can last for weeks, or months if necessary, so this makes everything very simple, you just have to leave empty hives to be occupied, wait until they are established and strong, and then, very carefully, take them to more than five hundred meters from where the mother hive is.

We must respect the natural populations, and not move them to places where they are not adapted to survive.

Because these hives are collaborating to recover environments and help with the increase of biodiversity, a task in which they are masters.

2. What you are asking here is answered in the previous response I gave you.
3. This hive is designed so that the space that we do not touch because we consider it sacred, has the necessary size so that nothing is missing, but if there was a danger that it would happen due to the bad state of the season, we simply DO NOT HARVEST ANYTHING.

I thank you very much for writing me, you are very kind, I am at your disposal.

Sorry if there was any error in the language because I'm translating software.
 
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Is there plans somewhere for your current hive?  I've been aware of your work for sometime now and it fits the style of beekeeping I would like to practice, leave the hive alone and harvest some honey once a year.

I however live too far north for the bees you are talking about.  Are there any changes recommended for the honey bees we have here in America?
 
Oscar Perone
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Jerry Ward wrote:Is there plans somewhere for your current hive?



Thank you very much for writing me, Mr. Jerry Ward.

I recommend that you see the video again, in the part that shows in detail the hive, and there you have all the necessary measures to build it.

This hive that I show is for the trigona species Tetragonisca angustula, called in Brazil Yateí, in Mexico and Colombia, angelitas, in Bolivia, señoritas, and in the north of my country, Rubitas.

I am working on building the special measures that the numerous trigonas and meliponas species in America need.

When you have those hives built, I will share the information with you.

Jerry Ward wrote:I've been aware of your work for sometime now and it fits the style of beekeeping I would like to practice, leave the hive alone and harvest some honey once a year.

I agree with you, and I share your wish.

Jerry Ward wrote:I however live too far north for the bees you are talking about.  Are there any changes recommended for the honey bees we have here in America?



In America, which goes from the South Pole to the North Pole, there are meliponas and trigonas bees and European and Africanized bees, I do not understand your question well, please tell me what kind of bees you are referring to so I can answer you properly, I hope your message.

I apologize for any error in the language, I am translating by software.


I greet you from Argentina
 
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This is beautiful!
Please post plans when you have created dimensions for North American honey bees!
A couple questions...
Are there ever problems with eggs in the triangle sections?
Is it hard to get the bees to vacate the triangle sections?
 
Oscar Perone
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Kelsey Bileen wrote:This is beautiful!
Please post plans when you have created dimensions for North American honey bees!
A couple questions...



I thank you very much for writing to me Kelsey Billen.
So I will do it, like a lot of pleasure

Kelsey Bileen wrote:Are there ever problems with eggs in the triangle sections?



There are no problems with eggs in the triangular sections because they do not lay eggs outside the shelter of their nest.

Kelsey Bileen wrote:Is it hard to get the bees to vacate the triangle sections?



To bother them as little as possible and the bees are not occupying the triangular sections, we take the box containing the full sections and leave them an empty containing empty triangular sections at night, when lower temperatures occur, the bees are together in the nest.

I apologize for possible errors in my language because I am translating using software.

Greetings from Argentina

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