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Indoor rocket cook stove

 
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Looking for a good brick rocket cooking stove plan with specific criteria.

It needs to fit on a table top and be indoors, so it has to be relatively small.
The best I could find is just an image with no info.
I don't know enough about this to guess how the back section is built.
It will be used in the Philippines where everybody cooks with an open fire indoors.
Venting doesn't seem to be a concern but at least a rocket makes things less smokey.
I like the j-tube idea for a self feeding fire, but I'm not sure the cooking surface would be very hot?
This image with the L-tube seems pretty good. All things being equal, Would the cooking surface at the top of the riser be hotter with a J-tube or L-tube design?

Image link (image 10, last one on page)

Snapguide
 
pollinator
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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You could look at this table top design



The Justa stove, is a L tube rocket, which is used in S. America and this shows a build



though some people have found these to be not hot enough, and have made cutouts in the metal cook plate so that pots can be immersed into the flame path.
As far as I know, there is no difference in heat between L and J tubes since the J tube is just a way of feeding fuel automatically for an L tube.
 
Dany Richard
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Thanks for your contribution. But that's much too large and complicated.
 
pollinator
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Rocket stoves need an insulated heat riser to work effectively, generally speaking the heat riser is 30” tall or more so unless you find a way to deviate away from the traditional designs.... it ain’t going to work as a table top cooker.
 
Dany Richard
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When I said tabletop, I meant On top of a low table. Of course the stove needs to respect the basic rules regarding dimensions for a rocket. That wasn't my question.
 
Fox James
pollinator
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Oh I am sorry so your question is ... you want plans to build a brick, rocket, cooking stove that might fit on top of a low table and is a J tube better than a L tube?

Can I first explain that a properly working rocket stove made from brick is going to be around four feet tall and weigh far more than an average table can take.

I think you might be looking at something that most people on this forum would not consider a proper rocket stove!

Perhaps a metal  construction like the many that can be found on YouTube might suit your needs better.
Unfortunately metal is not a good option for a rocket stove that is working at its best because of the extreme temperatures that are reached but it might suit your needs if you don’t need hight temperatures or total fuel combustion?

What this forum specialises in is based around a specific set of dimensions and criteria that allows total combustion of the fuel wood.
This requires a heavily insulated fire box and heat riser, inside the heat riser the temp can reach 2000f and heat a cooking plate to over 1000f
Both J tubes or L tubes can work but in my mind a J tube is easier to operate.
I do not know of any plans to suit your proposed idea.
 
Graham Chiu
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Rice husks are a free energy source in many parts of the Philipines.  You could consider using the rice gasifier stove designed there.

https://images.techxlab.org/ast/68-belonio-gasifier.pdf
 
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