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what wild foods do you gather in August?  RSS feed

 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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I would like to find out more about what wild foods people are gathering at different times of year..here right now we are finishing up on our wild raspberries, the blackberries are red but will be black soon, the chokecherries are black and nearly ready to pick and the elderberries are still green, but will be ready in a few weeks. There are also huckleberries or wild blueberries and a lot of other bush berries available this time of year..

A lot of the wild foods are not very often used anymore even though they were staples of the american indians..who would have died without them.

I would love to hear more about what you are doing with your wild foods available in your areas..at this time of year..Oh of course also the normal fruits are coming on, like apples, pears, etc..these also can be mixed with wild foods to make lovely meals..
 
Eric Thompson
Posts: 375
Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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There are lots of red huckleberries around here, but so many things are popping in the garden that I usually don't do a lot of wild harvesting from July through September..
 
Isaac Hill
gardener
Posts: 357
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Amaranth and Lambsquarters for the spinach like greens are great at this time here in Western PA. Elderberries are coming in, Sumac is now ready to make tea with, and the second generation of dandylion flowers!
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Purslane. On my sandwiches, in omelets, in salad.
 
ronie dee
Posts: 619
Location: NW MO
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Oyster mushrooms, after a rain (these might flush any month of the year). Chanterelle mushrooms are an August 'shroom in my area.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9740
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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The prickly pear and persimmon fruits are ripening, but I won't be harvesting any because all the animals around are starving because of our drought and they need the food more than I do. 

Most everything else is dormant or dead.

 
Mac Nova
Posts: 24
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Question needs more details. Not knowing where your at presents a problem I can tell you what to harvest where I'm at but having no idea where your at or what grows there its impossible to give any advice. Maybe mangos if your in Northern Oz?... 
 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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Like someone else said, in our area, Elderberries and sumac berries.  This fall is the time to harvest root crops, so keep that in mind.  Such as Dandelion, mullien or whatever else.
 
Jahnavi Veronica
Posts: 70
Location: Vancouver, WA
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Right now in southern WA, we're just about done harvesting wild cherries (so many this year!), now there's tons of thimbleberries, red huckleberries, black caps, native blackberries and the himalayan blackberries are starting to ripen.  Blue elderberries are close... probably another week or two until we can harvest those.  Salal berries are also very close.  Hmm... St. John's/Joan's wort is ready to harvest, pearly everlasting... and near the end of august will be time to harvest wild carrot seeds.

I'm probably forgetting some things... there's an abundance of food and medicine to harvest, not to mention everything in the garden...
 
ronie dee
Posts: 619
Location: NW MO
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Chicory blooms and the roots. Walnuts, hickory nuts. The blackberries are late this year - I usually harvest in June and July - they are just now ripening...weird season.

Some day lilies have blooms and the tuber could be harvested.
 
Jamie Jackson
Posts: 202
Location: Zone 5b - 6a, Missouri Ozarks
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oh yes, I forgot about mushrooms.  We have puffballs coming up now.  They are edible and save them when they get all dried out too.  The spores in the mushroom are good for big cuts till you can get to the ER
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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i'm in Michigan..this wasn't an "advice" post but to find out what other people are gleaning in their own areas..thanks
 
osker brown
Posts: 146
Location: Southern Appalachia
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I've recently become infatuated with Mayapples (Podophyllum peltatum)

They are a woodland groundcover that is prolific on our property under Hickories and Maples.  Their flavor is amazing, my wife says "sour apple, I say "tropical fig juice", my kids say "we want more".
 
Chris Holcombe
Posts: 114
Location: Zone 8b Portland
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I agree with the lambsquarters.  They're great 
 
Shailor Clark
Posts: 34
Location: Roanoke Island, North Carolina
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I live on the Outer Banks in North Carolina.
Right now in my small neighborhood I forage wild mint, groundcherries, lamb's-quarters, & dandelions/catsear. Yucca flowers are a nice little treat as well. I haven't been able to find blackberries or huckleberries for weeks now.. I think they've all been eaten by rabbits racoons & birds because it's been so dry here lately.
Also, at the beach there are LOTS of prickly pear cactus [fruit, seeds, pads & flowers are all edible] also there are the "searocket" plants which kind of taste like horseradish!

Oh yeah! There are SO many figs on this island that there are many trees popping out of the woods & in abandoned lots they are practically wild now!

Cheers
 
Shailor Clark
Posts: 34
Location: Roanoke Island, North Carolina
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shamanaste wrote:
I live on the Outer Banks in North Carolina.

Right now in my small neighborhood I forage wild mint, groundcherries, lamb's-quarters, & dandelions/cat's-ear. Yucca flowers are a nice little treat or an addition to salads!
I haven't been able to find blackberries or huckleberries for weeks now.. I think they've all been eaten by rabbits racoons & birds because it's been so dry here lately.
Wild carrots are abundant in a few areas as well

Also, at the beach there are an unbelieveable amount of prickly pear cactus [fruit, seeds, pads & flowers are all edible] & "searockets" are a great plant I've learned about this year, they kind of taste like horseradish.

Hmm.. and since this says wild foods & not just plants I want to add that for the first time in my life this year I've eaten "molecrabs" or "sandfiddlers" the little crabs that dig super fast into the shore! I've only tried them twice this year fried both times but they have an awesome flavor something like shrimp or bluecrabs & there are so many of them I don't feel bad about eating them! But it is quite a task to collect them.. I'm sure one could master it though.

Oh yeah! There are SO many figs on this island that there are many trees popping out of the woods & in abandoned lots they are practically wild now!

Cheers
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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today I gathered blackberries (small and seedy this year cause of drought), chokecherries and gooseberries from the wild about a mile walk from our house. (husband lost his glasses helping to pick the blackberries and chokecherries and we looked for 3 hours, didn't find them)
 
Isaac Hill
gardener
Posts: 357
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Black Nightshade - DELICIOUS
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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you gotta be kidding me, thought nightshade was poison..we have deadly nightshade here..but I wouldn't try eating it.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9740
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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If you're going to be eating nightshades, you better know what you're eating!  Tomatoes, tomatillos, and potatoes are  nightshades. 

http://foragersharvest.com/black-nightshade-2/

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solanum+nigrum
 
Melba Corbett
Posts: 164
Location: North Carolina
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sparticle wrote:
oh yes, I forgot about mushrooms.  We have puffballs coming up now.  They are edible and save them when they get all dried out too.  The spores in the mushroom are good for big cuts till you can get to the ER


Glad you mentioned puffball mushroom.  I've saved the spores in a jar and kept it in the barn for severe bleeding cuts on my horses or goats (and myself).  It can spontaneously combust and create fires, so keep in a fireproof area such as a metal cabinet. 
 
After burning through the drip stuff and the french press stuff, Paul has the last, ever, coffee maker. Better living through buying less crap.
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