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perenial onions vs grasses

 
master pollinator
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I have Egyptian Walking Onions and Potato Onions bulbs coming in the mail to me this week. I finally got in on the end of season sale! I need to know where to plant them.


http://www.southernexposure.com/egyptian-walking-onion-tree-onion-3-oz-p-1475.html

My garden space will be reduced next summer to about 20 X 50 feet. Some of this area will be taken up with hopefully rooting cuttings of grapes, mulberries, elderberries, etc. So my space is at at premium. I hope to put the onions elsewhere.

I am wondering how these onions do in an area that would get occasional weeding. 2 foot high grass would be normal.
Beneath my fruit trees, my White Multiplier onions were overpowered by assorted plants. I'd like to know if anyone has has a good harvest with these onions when they have to fight with grasses. I assume they would do better with an annual grass. I have one that is very short rooted, easy to thin, but it keeps out the ragweed, so I don't want to eradicate it at this time.

In summary, do I need to put them in my garden? Maybe between rows of rooting vegies?

Or will a nearly wild place with partial sun allow a decent harvest?
 
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The Egyptian onions are pretty competitive.  A few cultivations might be enough. More would be better.  Also depends on if you start with little top sets or established roots. After a year or two, they’ll compete a lot better. My grandparents had an old established patch about 4’x8’. It did fine with just mowing around it.

I don’t think the potato onions can take much competition. I would plant them in the garden.

Where was the sale?



 
Ken W Wilson
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Oh I see the link. I’ll check out the sale.
 
Ken W Wilson
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I wish they weren’t out of perennial leeks. I’ve been wanting to try them.

Not sure if it was a good idea, but I just got my order of a pound of shallots for 10.00 shipping included. Unknown variety. They are big and very healthy. I think they were meant for eating and not planting. I plan to plant them.
 
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i have those things in the picture, they are more like garlic than onion and the grow wild on a slope in front yard. they are great for cooking wood chuck, makes em taste just like roast beef
 
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This is the 2nd year for my Egyptian Walking Onions. The 1st year I planted them with my blue sage and all was well. this year the blue sage has been over powered by them and is not happy.

I transplanted about half of them to the vegetable garden in a border with tomatoes in the center.  The bed was plenty big for both of them.  The tomatoes were not happy and there was not room for the onions to walk.

Moral to my story might be watch what you plant them with and give them lots of space.

Rabbits were happy.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Ahem. The garden was flooded when the onions arrived. It remained soggy throughout winter, so I didn't plant them out until late spring. As would be expected, they were shriveled. But they lived! Yay!

The foliage did the expected dieback that is normal for us here in late summer. Both onions were weeded less than the ideal amount. The walking onions have come back. The foliage is about 12 inches tall. My garlic range from 4 to 6 inches tall right now.

If the potato onions have survived, shouldn't thay also be poking above ground?
 
bruce Fine
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i been eating them since i found em on my property

they taste and peel more like garlic than onions

now i have wild onions all over property too they have about a 1/2 bulb 3-4" down
and when i cut the grass it smells like chives
garlic.jpg
[Thumbnail for garlic.jpg]
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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I just reordered more potato onions. I will find a better place for next season!

End of season sale30% off!
sese.PNG
[Thumbnail for sese.PNG]
 
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I have about 10# of potato onions I was going to eat but i would be willing to share if SESE doesn't have them. They did very well over the winter even though they were in a crappy spot.
 
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Onion things usually do really well for me but Potato Onions totally failed the one time I tried them.  Weird.

 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Tj Jefferson wrote:I have about 10# of potato onions I was going to eat but i would be willing to share if SESE doesn't have them. They did very well over the winter even though they were in a crappy spot.



Awww shucks! I clicked the submit button before posting the sale. The order is being processed. Thank you anyway.
 
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