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master stewards:
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  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham
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Some PEP badges allow for oddball points.  This was introduced in this thread.

When submitting something in the official Oddball badge, you get points based on the time it would take a professional to do the same task if they have a bit of luck.

When submitting something within a badge that allows oddball points (Homesteading, Metalworking, etc), they are based on the time it would take a talented newbie to do the same task.

When you did something that should be in a badge but there isn't a BB for it, post about it in that badge and maybe it will become a BB.  If that badge allows oddball points, you can submit it there, otherwise it has to go into Oddball badge.

Some examples:
You welded up a 20 foot unicorn - put it into the Metalworking Oddball thread
You made a candle - put it in the regular Oddball thread since it isn't a clear fit for an existing badge
You build a pump house - post it in Homesteading since it should be a BB there and/or put it in this thread for Homesteading Oddball
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Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8445
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2422
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I had a nice sugar shack but it needed doors.  I wanted bypass barn doors but I couldn't find hardware for that locally.  So I had to get creative and make my own bypass barn door system.  I used normal barn door track and mounted two of them to the building.  Getting the outboard one beefy enough took a bit of work.  I then made the doors from 2x4s and 2x6s and the missus covered them with reclaimed pallet wood.  

The doors were a half lap joint in the corners which required a fair bit of chisel work.
Just-below-the-drills-is-where-the-track-hardware-will-go.jpg
Just below the drills is where the track hardware will go
Just below the drills is where the track hardware will go
First-track-cut-to-length-and-installed.-Wood-in-place-to-attache-the-second-track-to.jpg
First track cut to length and installed. Wood in place to attache the second track to
First track cut to length and installed. Wood in place to attache the second track to
Second-track-cut-and-installed.jpg
Second track cut and installed
Second track cut and installed
Door-frame-parts.jpg
Door frame parts
Door frame parts
Mr-Chickadee-would-be-proud.jpg
Mr Chickadee would be proud
Mr Chickadee would be proud
Tracks-are-different-lengths-since-one-is-higher-than-the-other.-Some-comedy-will-ensue....jpg
Tracks are different lengths since one is higher than the other. Some comedy will ensue...
Tracks are different lengths since one is higher than the other. Some comedy will ensue...
Making-door-frames-and-mounting-hanger-hardware.jpg
Making door frames and mounting hanger hardware
Making door frames and mounting hanger hardware
First-one-is-up.jpg
First one is up
First one is up
Both-are-up-(missus-putting-on-the-pallet-wood).jpg
Both are up (missus putting on the pallet wood)
Both are up (missus putting on the pallet wood)
 
paul wheaton
steward
Posts: 32488
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
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So, two tracks.  Therefore there is gap between the doors, right?  And the outer door is a little higher?
 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8445
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2422
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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Yes, yes and no.  The door hangers have a long bolt that gives several inches of adjustment.  So it allowed them to be about the same height.

To keep the gap between the doors I had to cobble together some standard hardware for my creative application.  I buried a cedar post to hold the hardware.  At the end I have some wooden slabs so that the doors can't overtravel and hit the underside of the soffit.

Here are some more pictures:
About-1.5-between-the-doors.jpg
About 1.5 between the doors
About 1.5 between the doors
Two-standard-brackets-mounted-in-non-standard-ways-to-give-a-bypass-door-that-doesn-t-rub.jpg
Two standard brackets mounted in non-standard ways to give a bypass door that doesn't rub
Two standard brackets mounted in non-standard ways to give a bypass door that doesn't rub
Outer-track-is-1.5-higher-but-hanger-bolt-is-longer-to-compensate.jpg
Outer track is 1.5 higher but hanger bolt is longer to compensate
Outer track is 1.5 higher but hanger bolt is longer to compensate
Staff note (paul wheaton) :

I hereby certify 10.5 points!

 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8445
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2422
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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After two years of trying unsuccessfully to heat my greenhouse with compost, I took out the compost bin recently.  It was 8' high and about 8' diameter.  Unfortunately it was a load bearing bin that was holding up a yoga platform.  I was able to remove the metal panels of the bin and leave the 2x4s in place to hold up the loft.  Then I removed all but the three that were actually holding things up.  I made a new single support post and 2x8 cross beam to take the place of the three 2x4s.  I jacked up the loft a bit, removed the 2x4s, excavated for a new footing for the post in the required spot, leveled the footing (reused cement blocks from another project) and set the loft back down on the new post.  It looks better and now there's room for a RMH...

All the boards for the new support were reused, it needed about 9 screws and a coat of the healthiest white stain we could find at the store (what we had already used on the rest of the greenhouse).  The removed parts were kept for reuse on other projects.
Bin-at-the-beginning-of-the-job.jpg
Bin at the beginning of the job
Bin at the beginning of the job
First-panel-removed.jpg
First panel removed
First panel removed
Panels-removed-about-to-start-pulling-out-2x4s.jpg
Panels removed, about to start pulling out 2x4s
Panels removed, about to start pulling out 2x4s
Jack-in-place-temporary-blocking-for-a-temporary-post-in-place.jpg
Jack in place, temporary blocking for a temporary post in place
Jack in place, temporary blocking for a temporary post in place
Weight-on-temporary-post-new-footing-in-position-(x-y-and-z).jpg
Weight on temporary post, new footing in position (x, y and z)
Weight on temporary post, new footing in position (x, y and z)
New-post-beam-combo-is-installed-.jpg
New post/beam combo is installed!
New post/beam combo is installed!
All-done-(except-a-bunch-of-clean-up).jpg
All done (except a bunch of clean up)
All done (except a bunch of clean up)
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this BB for 4 oddball points.

 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1526
Location: Fennville MI
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So, mm, yeah. I built a pumphouse. Was my first roundwood timberframing project and a test/practice run for developing some of the skills for doing this kind of joinery. Went with a metal roof, which we'll also be using on the house, again, partly for the practice. It's also a very long lasting product, so while there's a load of embodied energy, it amortizes over a long life span. Frustratingly, many of the pix I took of this project in progress appear to only exist in my uploads directory on FB and are gone from local storage. And I don't know how to get them here from there. Did all the mortise and tenon cutting with hand tools. Worked out all the rigging to lift all the frame members into place by hand, no machine assistance.
IMG_20191028_175434_833.jpg
Pump house roofing, interior detail
Pump house roofing, interior detail
IMG_20191129_195231_140.jpg
pump house door construction
pump house door construction
IMG_20191020_194616_519.jpg
Pump house siding
Pump house siding
IMG_20191028_175504_148.jpg
Interior showing frame construction
Interior showing frame construction
 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 8445
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2422
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I built a chicken coop!  The primary building material was pallets.  The structure of the walls and roof is 3' by 6' pallets from a nearby factory.  They're used once and put out back for the public.  They hold rolls of potato chip bag material and are heat treated.  They're also 80+ pounds and made from oak or maple.  They're exceedingly strong.

I cleared a spot under a white pine.  It's sandy so I just leveled the area and laid down cinder blocks.  I did buy them since used ones are fairly hard to find around here for some reason.  And I didn't want gaps for snakes or weasels to get in through so I liked how they were very rectangular.  I also don't have rocks to build with anyway on my site.  The only other major purchased materials were the metal roofing, housewrap and cattle panels for the hoop house.  The doors were upcycled or from the Habitat Restore.  

It's 9' wide by 12' long.  The roof is two pitches so that the hoop house can fit under the eave on the west side.  The hoop greenhouse gives the birds a warmer place to hang out in winter.  

The walls are higher than 6' on the west side so I made some short pallets to get another 2 feet of height.  The roof pallets are supported with a center beam so that I don't have cross ties to hit my head on.  All the windows and vents were carefully built to make sure critters couldn't get in.  Hardware cloth is on all the windows.  I made the windows from pallet scraps and some left over greenhouse glazing panels.  They aren't my best work but they do the job.

In addition to building the structure from pallets, I used deconstructed pallet boards for the siding inside and out.

Caveats:
1.  50+ pallets for the siding were disassembled by me but installed by the missus so I don't get credit for installing the pallet boards on the walls.
2.  The coop is wired but I'll submit that in the Electricity badge.
Here-s-the-site-and-my-ass.jpg
Here's the site and my ass
Here's the site and my ass
Clearing-the-perimeter-footing.jpg
Clearing the perimeter/footing
Clearing the perimeter/footing
Blocks-going-down-(no-mortar).-Two-in-the-center-to-support-where-the-pallets-meet..jpg
Blocks going down (no mortar). Two in the center to support where the pallets meet.
Blocks going down (no mortar). Two in the center to support where the pallets meet.
Floor-going-on.jpg
Floor going on
Floor going on
Walls-going-up.-Aren-t-those-some-pretty-pallets-.jpg
Walls going up. Aren't those some pretty pallets?
Walls going up. Aren't those some pretty pallets?
First-floor-walls-done.jpg
First floor walls done
First floor walls done
Adding-the-higher-bit-on-the-west-side.-Support-for-the-beam-and-door-frame-is-installed..jpg
Adding the higher bit on the west side. Support for the beam and door frame is installed.
Adding the higher bit on the west side. Support for the beam and door frame is installed.
Beam-is-up-and-rafter-template-is-in-place-to-test-angles-and-birds-mouths.jpg
Beam is up and rafter template is in place to test angles and birds mouths
Beam is up and rafter template is in place to test angles and birds mouths
Quality-Control-is-checking-the-roof.-She-s-not-impressed.jpg
Quality Control is checking the roof. She's not impressed
Quality Control is checking the roof. She's not impressed
Bones-of-the-coop-are-in-place.jpg
Bones of the coop are in place
Bones of the coop are in place
House-wrap-to-block-drafts-(gets-to-30F-here).-Roof-metal-going-on..jpg
House wrap to block drafts (gets to -30F here). Roof metal going on.
House wrap to block drafts (gets to -30F here). Roof metal going on.
Chicken-door-plus-siding-going-on-(installed-by-the-missus).jpg
Chicken door plus siding going on (installed by the missus)
Chicken door plus siding going on (installed by the missus)
Soffit-installed-by-me-vented-soffit-on-the-sides..jpg
Soffit installed by me, vented soffit on the sides.
Soffit installed by me, vented soffit on the sides.
Windows-and-vents-are-close-to-done..jpg
Windows and vents are close to done.
Windows and vents are close to done.
Door-on..jpg
Door on.
Door on.
Chicken-greenhouse-back-wall-going-in.jpg
Chicken greenhouse back wall going in
Chicken greenhouse back wall going in
Back-wall-in-hoop-showing-the-curve-so-that-the-windows-aren-t-covered-it-s-as-wide-as-possible-and-I-can-stand-in-it..jpg
Back wall in, hoop showing the curve so that the windows aren't covered, it's as wide as possible and I can stand in it.
Back wall in, hoop showing the curve so that the windows aren't covered, it's as wide as possible and I can stand in it.
Hoop-mostly-done.jpg
Hoop mostly done
Hoop mostly done
Hoop-done-and-critter-resistant.jpg
Hoop done and critter resistant
Hoop done and critter resistant
Coop-done.jpg
Coop done
Coop done
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this for 20 oddball homestead points.

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