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master stewards:
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  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
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  • John F Dean
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gardeners:
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  • Leigh Tate
 
Posts: 1536
Location: Fennville MI
60
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So, mm, yeah. I built a pumphouse. Was my first roundwood timberframing project and a test/practice run for developing some of the skills for doing this kind of joinery. Went with a metal roof, which we'll also be using on the house, again, partly for the practice. It's also a very long lasting product, so while there's a load of embodied energy, it amortizes over a long life span. Frustratingly, many of the pix I took of this project in progress appear to only exist in my uploads directory on FB and are gone from local storage. And I don't know how to get them here from there. Did all the mortise and tenon cutting with hand tools. Worked out all the rigging to lift all the frame members into place by hand, no machine assistance.
IMG_20191028_175434_833.jpg
Pump house roofing, interior detail
Pump house roofing, interior detail
IMG_20191129_195231_140.jpg
pump house door construction
pump house door construction
IMG_20191020_194616_519.jpg
Pump house siding
Pump house siding
IMG_20191028_175504_148.jpg
Interior showing frame construction
Interior showing frame construction
 
master steward
Posts: 9350
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2704
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I built a chicken coop!  The primary building material was pallets.  The structure of the walls and roof is 3' by 6' pallets from a nearby factory.  They're used once and put out back for the public.  They hold rolls of potato chip bag material and are heat treated.  They're also 80+ pounds and made from oak or maple.  They're exceedingly strong.

I cleared a spot under a white pine.  It's sandy so I just leveled the area and laid down cinder blocks.  I did buy them since used ones are fairly hard to find around here for some reason.  And I didn't want gaps for snakes or weasels to get in through so I liked how they were very rectangular.  I also don't have rocks to build with anyway on my site.  The only other major purchased materials were the metal roofing, housewrap and cattle panels for the hoop house.  The doors were upcycled or from the Habitat Restore.  

It's 9' wide by 12' long.  The roof is two pitches so that the hoop house can fit under the eave on the west side.  The hoop greenhouse gives the birds a warmer place to hang out in winter.  

The walls are higher than 6' on the west side so I made some short pallets to get another 2 feet of height.  The roof pallets are supported with a center beam so that I don't have cross ties to hit my head on.  All the windows and vents were carefully built to make sure critters couldn't get in.  Hardware cloth is on all the windows.  I made the windows from pallet scraps and some left over greenhouse glazing panels.  They aren't my best work but they do the job.

In addition to building the structure from pallets, I used deconstructed pallet boards for the siding inside and out.

Caveats:
1.  50+ pallets for the siding were disassembled by me but installed by the missus so I don't get credit for installing the pallet boards on the walls.
2.  The coop is wired but I'll submit that in the Electricity badge.
Here-s-the-site-and-my-ass.jpg
Here's the site and my ass
Here's the site and my ass
Clearing-the-perimeter-footing.jpg
Clearing the perimeter/footing
Clearing the perimeter/footing
Blocks-going-down-(no-mortar).-Two-in-the-center-to-support-where-the-pallets-meet..jpg
Blocks going down (no mortar). Two in the center to support where the pallets meet.
Blocks going down (no mortar). Two in the center to support where the pallets meet.
Floor-going-on.jpg
Floor going on
Floor going on
Walls-going-up.-Aren-t-those-some-pretty-pallets-.jpg
Walls going up. Aren't those some pretty pallets?
Walls going up. Aren't those some pretty pallets?
First-floor-walls-done.jpg
First floor walls done
First floor walls done
Adding-the-higher-bit-on-the-west-side.-Support-for-the-beam-and-door-frame-is-installed..jpg
Adding the higher bit on the west side. Support for the beam and door frame is installed.
Adding the higher bit on the west side. Support for the beam and door frame is installed.
Beam-is-up-and-rafter-template-is-in-place-to-test-angles-and-birds-mouths.jpg
Beam is up and rafter template is in place to test angles and birds mouths
Beam is up and rafter template is in place to test angles and birds mouths
Quality-Control-is-checking-the-roof.-She-s-not-impressed.jpg
Quality Control is checking the roof. She's not impressed
Quality Control is checking the roof. She's not impressed
Bones-of-the-coop-are-in-place.jpg
Bones of the coop are in place
Bones of the coop are in place
House-wrap-to-block-drafts-(gets-to-30F-here).-Roof-metal-going-on..jpg
House wrap to block drafts (gets to -30F here). Roof metal going on.
House wrap to block drafts (gets to -30F here). Roof metal going on.
Chicken-door-plus-siding-going-on-(installed-by-the-missus).jpg
Chicken door plus siding going on (installed by the missus)
Chicken door plus siding going on (installed by the missus)
Soffit-installed-by-me-vented-soffit-on-the-sides..jpg
Soffit installed by me, vented soffit on the sides.
Soffit installed by me, vented soffit on the sides.
Windows-and-vents-are-close-to-done..jpg
Windows and vents are close to done.
Windows and vents are close to done.
Door-on..jpg
Door on.
Door on.
Chicken-greenhouse-back-wall-going-in.jpg
Chicken greenhouse back wall going in
Chicken greenhouse back wall going in
Back-wall-in-hoop-showing-the-curve-so-that-the-windows-aren-t-covered-it-s-as-wide-as-possible-and-I-can-stand-in-it..jpg
Back wall in, hoop showing the curve so that the windows aren't covered, it's as wide as possible and I can stand in it.
Back wall in, hoop showing the curve so that the windows aren't covered, it's as wide as possible and I can stand in it.
Hoop-mostly-done.jpg
Hoop mostly done
Hoop mostly done
Hoop-done-and-critter-resistant.jpg
Hoop done and critter resistant
Hoop done and critter resistant
Coop-done.jpg
Coop done
Coop done
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this for 20 oddball homestead points.

 
Mike Haasl
master steward
Posts: 9350
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2704
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
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I replaced a broken garage door opener today.  First I tried to fix it by resoldering the mother board.  That didn't break it any worse than it was but it didn't fix the intermittent issue.  Then it got worse to the point where it wouldn't open no matter how many times you whacked it.  So I got a new one and changed them out.  Today I learned that you can't just change the motor/unit out, you have to replace the rail and chain too.  Who knew?

It went pretty well.  I took down the old unit, safety sensors and push button and then assembled the new rail, motor and chain.  Put that up and connected it to the door and ran the new wires to the new sensors and push button.  Made a few up/down travel adjustments and it's all done.  Yay, just in time for winter!
Old-opener-post-troubleshooting-Chain-disconnected-already.jpg
Old opener - post troubleshooting Chain disconnected already
Old opener - post troubleshooting Chain disconnected already
New-one-installed-with-wires-run.jpg
New one installed with wires run
New one in place
Install-done.jpg
Install done
Install done
It-works-.jpg
It works!!!!
It works!!!!
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

I certify this for one oddball point.

 
pollinator
Posts: 506
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It happens to be a lovey warm November day here in Michigan, probably the last one for the year.  The other day I noticed the screen door for my front door was not latching well.  Investigating further I declare it fundamentally a poor design for the door.  Over time the aluminum hinges are literally grinding themselves away under the weight of the door and the swinging motion.  Rather than replacing the whole door I want to see if I can find a solution that will salvage it for a while longer, and perhaps even fix the issue indefinitely.

For an overview of what I did, I pulled the door off the hinges, removed the hinges, found some finish washers I already had lying around that fit to build up the space that had worn down thus raising the door up higher again so the latch should fit.  My hope is that these added washers and the way they fit over the aluminum sections will stop the slow grinding down of the aluminum.  Time will tell on that, but this should give me a few more years use of the door at least.

Overall, figuring out how to disassemble, find the parts, install them, and reassemble the door I probably spent about an hour.  Unfortunately I also broke the jaws on one of my really expensive sets of jewelers non-marring pliers, making this a more pricey fix than it should have been.  Grrr...   I believe I can get replacement jaws for those though so they aren't totally destroyed thankfully.  Ok, here are some documenting images.

DSC05633.JPG
This shows how the door latch had dropped down to a level where it doesn't really catch anymore.
This shows how the door latch had dropped down to a level where it doesn't really catch anymore.
DSC05634.JPG
Here is a close up of one of the aluminum hinges showing how it has been worn away over time causing the whole door to drop down in level.
Here is a close up of one of the aluminum hinges showing how it has been worn away over time causing the whole door to drop down in level.
DSC05636.JPG
The first thing I did was remove the door from the hinges.
The first thing I did was remove the door from the hinges.
DSC05637.JPG
Here is an image of one of the hinges as seen from the inside showing how it is really just metal bent around the rod, and what I need to take apart and fix.
Here is an image of one of the hinges as seen from the inside showing how it is really just metal bent around the rod, and what I need to take apart and fix.
DSC05638.JPG
This in one of the hinges after I fit in a finishing washer on the bottom side, where all the wear happens, raising it up again.
This in one of the hinges after I fit in a finishing washer on the bottom side, where all the wear happens, raising it up again.
DSC05639.JPG
This shows another of the hinges where I had to insert 2 finish washers to get the elevation needed.
This shows another of the hinges where I had to insert 2 finish washers to get the elevation needed.
DSC05640.JPG
These are the tools used in the job. Fairly simple. I did curse when the one set of plier broke! :(
These are the tools used in the job. Fairly simple. I did curse when the one set of plier broke! :(
DSC05641.JPG
A close up image of the door reattached to one of the hinges.
A close up image of the door reattached to one of the hinges.
DSC05642.JPG
A shot of the latch section showing that it has been elevated again to where it latches well.
A shot of the latch section showing that it has been elevated again to where it latches well.
DSC05643.JPG
Exterior view of the repaired storm door.
Exterior view of the repaired storm door.
Staff note :

Certified for 1/2 homesteading oddball point

 
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work - Edison. Tiny ad:
Simple Home Energy Solutions, battery bank videos
https://permies.com/wiki/151158/Simple-Home-Energy-Solutions-battery
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