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Alternative to seedling heat mat  RSS feed

 
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Location: Olympia, Wa
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I am working on building my seed starting racks. It will have flourescent tubes and the works. I don't want to buy heat mats because of the expense but the racks will be in my basement which is pretty cold. My thought is why not just heat the whole environment? The racks will be wrapped on plastic (partially to keep the cats out) they should be able to keep in a decent amount of heat. Can I just heat the whole environment or do I need to heat the soil directly? Maybe a small ceramic heater.
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Here's my germination chamber...

A box, containing a fluorescent light, a baseboard heater thermostat controlling a 100/200 watt ceramic heater. The whole thing is turned on for 16 hours per day with a timer. I set it for about 85 F during the day, and it falls to about 65 F at night.
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Wisteria, Opuntia, and blood orange growing in germination chamber.
 
Chris Emerson
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:Here's my germination chamber...

A box, containing a fluorescent light, a baseboard heater thermostat controlling a 100/200 watt ceramic heater. The whole thing is turned on for 16 hours per day with a timer. I set it for about 85 F during the day, and it falls to about 65 F at night.



Looks like it is working great for you! Thanks for the picture.
 
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i have that same honeywell 175/250W heater
i keep it on full time next to my fan and cold air humidifier (175W and turn it up only on the coldest stretches)
i think the tropicals are much happier this year in part due to the heater
 
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I like the wisteria Joseph! I had one and it bloomed the year I bought it at only 2 feet tall. Then the deer came
 
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Location: The Arkansas Ozarks
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Thomas Fleafest wrote:I like the wisteria Joseph! I had one and it bloomed the year I bought it at only 2 feet tall. Then the deer came



Hi Thomas,

Understand the problem.  You need to build some cages to keep the wisteria from roaming around in the yard where the deer can eat them.  We have 20 plus deer for dinner every night and even with all the corn we feed them I still need to build cages to protect the plants.

Sincerely,

Ralph
 
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In the old days the old time farmers would put their seedlings on hot compost piles.

That seemed like such a good idea to me.
 
Chris Emerson
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Mart Hale wrote:In the old days the old time farmers would put their seedlings on hot compost piles.

That seemed like such a good idea to me.



That would be awesome to accomplish. But alas.. I'm in Washington state and we have a foot of snow on the ground, my compost pile is as cold as it gets! Maybe something to work towards!
 
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