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Hey All,

We're on the Olympic Peninsula in WA State making round buildings and other such curved walls out of thin strips of wet sawn lumber and a lot of 1 and 2 inch thich boards that we cut ourselves. We see a lot of application for chicken coops, raised beds, garden walls, yurts, sheds, and whatever else can be round or curved. Since we have our own lumber mill and chipper we have ample chips to make woodcrete, which we often put in our walls. I just graduated trade school in Carpentry in Seattle and I'm working with my buddy who is pioneering this process of doing light weight, curved carpentry as a retired builder who was looking for a method that wouldnt tear up his body so much.

We also cut our own shingles, and make good use of Solexx (corrugated plastic) for letting in light. Future directions are heading toward geothermal green houses, underground buildings and inviting carpenters to learn about off grid living, something my buddy has been doing for 30 years.

wetspunbuilding.wordpress.com for pictures of our work. Feel free to message me on here or there with any questions, or post a comment.

Cheers and Happy Spring.

Forrest
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pollinator
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Thanks for sharing your unique skills!

 
pollinator
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Your  roofs are amazing!
The garden walls,  forms for woodcrete?
What fastener or joining do you  favor?
I wonder if the savings from round buildings is outweighed by the wasted space.
Unless one is making all the cabinetry and furniture by hand,  you will be hard pressed to find things that fit the curve of a given house.
It's not as challenging as in a dome,but it's an issue.
I suppose open floor plans and hallways locating hallways at the outer wall could really help.
Limited space for the building itself is another factor, the buildings diameter being limited to the shortest side of a rectangular lot.
Still,  your sawmill shop in particular has real appeal, probably because there are no sides to conform to.
 
Forrest Little
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Thank You Michelle and William!

William, as to your questions--

Garden walls, yes, forms for woodcrete.. We're thinking of the 3/16×4 strips as wood "fabric" forms. We use 1x1 stakes driven into the ground in the shape of the curve we want, and then staple it all together with roofing staples from pneumatic guns. Most of the structure is held together with roofing staples of various sizes, except our posts are held together with 16D nails. We pour the woodcrete into the walls and it acts like poured plywood with a similar resonant sound when you hit it.

Savings versus wasted space aside, I think there are 2 distinct advantages to round buildings. One is structural integrity for earthquakes and wind. Another, for me, is feeling better in a round building, and assuming that curves are better for plants. They have a soothing quality.

As for furniture, yes, it may be a pain in the butt. We've been thinking of round backed furniture instead of cabinetry, have the capacity to do so but havent started yet. Also, poured in place cement counter tops are a good option for the curves.

Regarding lay out question, yeah I imagine open floor plans would help with that and also heating the thing. We havent really gone there yet because the closest thing we've done to a home is a small yurt cabin and a sauna, but we are thinking a lot about using wide roof over hangs as auxilary space, perhaps for things that dont require as much heat; putting the whole thing part way in a hill like a wofatti house; and/or attaching a curved greenhouse for solar gain. Also sleeping pods.  Think glamping or healing retreat center accomodations.

Right now we're cutting material to do a new saw mill. It will be 3 overlapping round roofs in a slight curve, with one taller in the middle. Pictures to come in the next few weeks. My buddy is testing the new truss system at the moment.

Speaking of roofs, at the bottom of wetspunbuilding page there is a video of our roof spinning. One advantage of our system is that during construction we put the whole roof on a hub with bearings, and it spins until we attach the walls. That way we can get up to height and stand in one place, turning the roof and attaching blocks and bands. Saving a bit of labor not having to walk around the building at height.

Thank you for your interest!

Forrest
 
William Bronson
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Thank for your explanations!

You mentioned furniture, with that springy material and your skills, I imagine an extremely comfortable bed could be made.
Three overlapping circle roofs could do alot to fill in a rectangular lot.
The framing of your structures already boggles my mind, I hope to see some shots of that build.
A hallway/sunspace  on the outer edge could give you pie slices as inner rooms with at least two strait edged walls each, plenty for cabinetry/furnishing.
Wood heat in the center, masonry/or rocket stove perhaps?
Of course, maybe a round roof protects a differently shaped structure.
Maybe its a square in the middle of a wrap around green house!

I love indoor/ outdoor space, I'm wondering  what you can do with wooden screens.
Just how thin can you make your material?
Transparent wood is a thing, but not on a homestead scale, yet, as far as I know.
Am I asking too much?
Your work is what makes me wonder to far out there, its really exceptional!


I've started transplanting willow and willow stakes from a free source.
My 10 year old daughter is an avid maker, and wants her own "house" on our property.
I am thinking we might build with willow, living and otherwise, in round shapes, dome, onion domes and arches.
She might not be ready for a nail gun, but maybe so, she uses power tools.
That reminds me, have you built any hoop house style structures?
 
Forrest Little
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Hi William,

Thank you for having this conversation with me

Yeah the furniture question.. Interesting idea on a springy bed.. I suspect we would make a bed platform like we make our floors.  Essentially radial trusses between concentric ring beams like in our roofs but flat, then we cover the top with a tarp and staple on a spiral of 3/16x2 strips from the center out, spaced by 1×1×2 blocks, and pour woodcrete on top and in all the spaces of the spiral. Then, well, we've talked a lot about straw beds. Personally I sleep in a hammock. I should add, one of the things we're going for is the grounding or "earthing" concept, so having a bed and floors that were naturally grounded to the dirt would be a goal for us. Right now I just use a groundung mat.

Yes the framing... I call it advanced advanced framing. Its so much less material. We havent gone down the road of trying to get an engineer on board yet, but for lumber grading a lot of issues come up with longer boards, so with our shorter blocks perhaps it will be an advantage. Certainly seems like a more forgiving design with a ton of redundancy.

I like the pie slice idea. Thats definitely a way to get straight lines, though knowing us we'd probably do something silly like do a curved wall.

Yeah wood heat, masonry/rocket stove are all on our minds. We also are toying with the idea of a propane light as a primary source of heat once we get our insulation levels figured out.

My buddy did a round roof with 3 smaller round walls in a triangle undereath, currently its used for a wood shed and storage. Yeah I could see a differently shaped wall system, though it really seems like a great strength advantage having those curves. I think with square we're back to traditional or advanced framing, but maybe not.. There is a house where I live with a round roof and square walls. It sounded like everyone went crazy who lived there.

Yes transparent wood, thats an excellent idea. Maybe if we started using our cabinetry saw.. Our band saw goes down to about a 1/16, sometimes we get close to that for the center of the spiral on the roof. So far ae do lattice, maybe experimenting with a transparent screen is in order soon.. Maybe woven or like a more geometrically regular wattle.

OMG a living a building. We are very very interested in this and were experimenting with alder. We are also very interested in mycoblocks and getting an innoculated wall that would be structural. So cool you've got your daughter on board.

The great thing about staples is if one goes into your finger you've still got a finger and no hospital visit. Soon if not quite ready yet, pneumatic staples will be a great way for her to do things like that. Also we are very interested in string and rope, knots and lashing as an option.

I havent done any hoop houses yet. Will have to look into it.

Thank you again so much for your compliments and questions. Its great to be talking.

Forrest
 
William Bronson
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Is this an example of your spiral roof?
I notice greening on your roofs,  I imagine your woodcrete being colonized!

Straw beds sound cool, maybe sawdust beds would work!
Your use of small short peices of lumber is elegant.
I can tell you love the feel of the curved spaces,  so cool you are skilled in making them happen.
I think I saw a wood spiral set into one of your earthen floors,  is that right?



 
garden master
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OH MY!! Those are amazingly beautiful work!!! My compliments!
And now I'm thinking up ideas....
WOW. COOL.
 
Forrest Little
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Hi William,

Yes! Its a spiral roof. Thats the only one we've put woodcrete into so far. We nailed a tarp to the underside and it held it up pretty well. The spiral part is the purlin, made of strips of 3/16×2 douglas fir, built up about an inch thick. They're on top of the roof trusses, held apart by parallelogram shaped purlin blocks. Basically its just a surface to staple the shingles onto, but it also seems to really beef up the roof structurally. We had one tip over on us when I was first getting involved, basically we were trying to do low impact on a really mucky area. The roof acted like a basket, as if you had one tipped on its side. No damage at all.

Yes I'm sure it'll all get colonized Really curious what mycelium will do. There's actually a concrete additive thats a bacteria that poops out limestone. I wonder what effects our colonies will have..

Saw dust beds! Yeah the trouble around here would be finding some that hasnt been seasoned by the chickens..

And yes, same thing for the floors just horizontal rather than at a slope. And the purlin and blocks become like a wood rebar of sorts for the woodcrete and a thin layer of cement on top.

Yeah thank you so much. I'm really excited about getting to so more with round.. It seems to fit well with my life. Happy to be chatting!

Forrest

 
Forrest Little
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Hi Pearl,

Thank you so much for checking out our work! Ideas! Exciting

Forrest
 
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Hi Forrest.  Love your work.  Did you mention that there is a video of your process.  Would love to see some of your work in action

Kathy Desjardins
 
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Wow, that is beautiful!

This is the first time i have heard of woodcrete. Amazing idea!

Do you think that woodcrete would make a good water storage tank, or would there be trouble? (Setting aside the issue of whether concrete itself is safe as a water tank, which i have seen discussed in other threads here.)

Do you think the rounded green wood itself could be used to make a good water storage tank, or would the wet wood just fall apart in a few years?

Thanks!
 
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WOW!  What a cool concept!

Re furniture in round buildings, I live in a 30' yurt.  One concept that works is to put the square stuff in the middle, rather than against the walls--like someone said above, hallways can have rounded sides, counters and tables are a pain.  But, in a big enough circle, like my yurt, you only lose about 2" over a 4' wide bookshelf, for example, which is not that much lost space.  If you figure that metric out for your size circle, you know how to build efficiently.  And, to avoid having to recalculate the curve all the time, a neighbor of mine built a dining room table with edges the same curve as his yurt walls.  It fits beautifully, and is a handy curve template for anything he wants to make to fit snugly against the actual wall, too.  
 
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Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
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I love your work! It has been a dream of mine since I was a teenager to build a round or dome home. Life, and aging got in the way. Keep up posting on your experiences, it gives light to those of us not as skilled as you.
 
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Forrest, you are an artisan - I am sure you know that already. I feel there may come a collaboration of sorts between us in the future - we live fairly closely at this point (though across the border)

I think your creativity is awesome. I particularly love your gates - very nice work there!

Look forward to reading more about your projects in the meantime, and I'd love to learn about the long term success of "woodcrete".

I'm going to suggest another American artisan to you via Youtube. Check out "Mr Chickadee".


Ps: I am a huge fan of round houses myself for their lack of sharp angles and I lived in a round mudhut/ thatch roof in the Eastern Cape in South Africa that was over 100 years old, for six months once. The floor was made from cattle dung. One of my workers drove a small Massey Ferguson tractor through one portion of the wall and the building stood strong. He repaired it with some simple mud and grass and it was resealed just fine.

Does anyone know the terminology/ name for building furniture "naturally"? No dimensional lumber at all, just using natural forms of timber to make beds, counters, kitchen cupboards etc. Traditional style joinery (M/T etc). Any clues?
 
Forrest Little
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Hi Josephine,

Thank you for your feedback. Hopefully as this technique becomes more popular it will become available and affordable in your area. Part of the idea is that its cutting the cost of housing because of the efficiency of building round, using uncured wood that never had to be shipped, etc. Again, thank you for your encouragement.

PS I dont know if you've already found monolithic domes, but they seem like a pretty popular option these days. Might be worth a look. One thing good about not living in a traditional yurt is that the kits dont last as long as a traditional house.  We're trying to help bridge the gap between round and long lasting.

Best,

Forrest

Hi Isa,

Thank you for your comment!
Those are great ideas for getting things to fit. We’ve also thought about making furniture with the same curve as the wall. Thoughts! Enjoy Yurt Life

Best
Forrest

Hi Kay,

Thank you for your comment!  Yeah we really like working with the stuff, seems to be structural and insulating. I would imagine that woodcrete would be all right for water storage if you then coated the walls with shotcrete. And I wonder about using just wood sprayed with shotcrete instead of a woodcrete filled wall. The monolithic domes are fabric forms sprayed with shotcrete, though they also have rebar and basalt rope to get curved reinforcement. Water is a lot of weight, I bet some simple experiments could get one a baseline for whats going to fail or not. As for rotting, using a foodgrade plastic liner would likely be in order. Also there are concrete additives to achieve waterproof, or traditional lime plaster has a waterproofing technique with soap scum and polishing. I was just talking to Eric about it, and he’d like to say the woodcrete wall coated with concrete would be structural enough, if we were doing it. Others results may vary

Best, Forrest

Hi Kathy,

Good to be talking to you on the other site. Thanks for your comments!

Best,
Forrest
 
Posts: 280
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Re: woodcrete for water tanks

The lignin component of wood is in some senses related to phenol.  I believe that some phenolic resins can be made from lignin.  A particular phenolic resin (resorcinol) I believe obtains much of its binding power by bonds to lignin.  The US FPL had a long running program on trying to obtain durable bonds of epoxy to wood.  I don't know how many papers they wrote, I read a few.  Resorcinol was often mentioned in this context.

There have been water tanks made from phenolic resins.  Catalysts are required, and it is possible to not get a complete cure.  You may need to use elevated temperatures to get a complete cure.  The following paper talks about a particular example of where a phenolic resin did not cure completely for a water tank.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000145.htm


Re: transparent wood

I believe CSIRO (or some other organization in Australia?) has come up with a process to make wood absorb significantly less light.  It might be mostly extracting lignin from the wood?

 
Gordon Haverland
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In terms of translucent wood, my feeling is that the description of this process had every second word being "patent".  Which is why I thought CSIRO was involved, as I haven't seen them do very much for the betterment of society; everything is patented.

Pawlonia (sp?) is a white wood that cuts very fine (it is probably invasive, it grows very fast), perhaps it could be made into translucent panels.

I believe someone in this thread was talking about useful aspens?  Aspen is the most abundant tree in the forest here.  Willow and poplar are probably next.  I'm not crazy about aspens, but I am learning how to make jackleg fence out of them.  I need to try and keep the deer (deer being white tail, mule and moose).
 
William Bronson
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There is an Instructible available on DIY transparent wood:
https://www.instructables.com/id/Transparent-Wood/
Looks pretty labor/resource intensive.

There is also this:
https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Build-a-6000-gallon-Water-Tank/

A nice guide to a low-cost water tank.
It uses sheet metal,a plastic liner, rated for potable water,and the force distributing power of the circle.
I've wondered if a plywood version could work as well.
Now I wonder about  laminated wood hoops, holding together staves, like a huge all wood barrel.

The idea of a house of living willow came from this thread:
https://permies.com/t/27725/Photos-growing-eco-buildings
Check it out,  I think you will appreciate the carpentry, especially the arches.


 
Gordon Haverland
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I think the problem with a wood reservoir; is that it is porous to oxygen and it is porous to water.  Make a reservoir out of wood and concrete, it is now porous to water and concrete.

The US FPL worked a long time on trying to develop durable epoxy bonds to wood.  I never seen success, maybe you have?

Having concrete in inteimae contact with the wood (whatever kind it is), predisposes it to problems of high pH.

My thinking, is (and has been) to apply a fibreglass/phenolic resin coating to the woodcrete.  The phenolic resin is chosen to bond well to the wood.  The layer of glass (maybe more than 1) is not there to provide strength, it is there to allow enough phenolic resin "build" to become water proof.  Are there fibreglass clothes which are wet by the phenolic resin in question?

Good luck getting any government body to approve this.  This is not some way of saying it is impossible. It may be possible, I don't know.

And yet, people mature wine (water and ethanol) in oak.  And if oak isn't  desired, the next choice is acacia.  But in North America, acacia is being interpreted as Black Locust, which was  a real revelation to me.

I'm still learning as to what woods to use for what purposes.

 
Lito George
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Gordon Haverland wrote:
But in North America, acacia is being interpreted as Black Locust, which was  a real revelation to me



That is news to me too. Is it a legitimate interpretation? We have indigenous Acacia trees back home in South Africa, whose thorns puncture truck tires fairly regularly. The thorns easily grow longer than a large mans hand.

Plenty of Youtube tutorials showing how to make transparent wood. Seems silly though.
 
Forrest Little
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Hi Lito,

Thank you so much for your compliments. At some point if you become interested in paying us a visit and find yourself in the area we would be happy to schedule something. I must say I am quite a home body these days for the peninsula but that could change.

Its funny, I had the phrase "artisan trades" on my mind for years between graduating with a psych ba and going to trade school. I narrowly escaped grad school and sort of fell into this working with my buddy Eric, who really came up with everything. Now I get to join in on the fun of developing the techniques further. I'm really happy to be blending my artistic side with my developing practical side. Its kind of surreal to hear that word artisan, since it really seems to be the path I'm getting to go down after so many years of a vague notion that it was important. I wish more people in my generation had the opportunities I've had to start over, in a way, doing something concrete.

As for woodcrete, if you google moscow idaho and woodcrete you'll get a mother earth news article of a guy doing a home in 1978. I havent heard anything about how that home is doing today. Eric was mentioning its pretty popular in Australia as well. When I was in carpentry school all my professors were concerned about the rot issue of wet wood in the concrete, but I'd like to think its over blown. Industrial woodcrete is made by adding the wood to concrete, drying it, then breaking it up and re adding it to more concrete for a more uniform product. Perhaps that would be better, but I havent seen any comparison. Apparently its bullet proof..

I added Mr Chickadee to my youtube feed and am checking out his stuff. Thank you for the recommendation.

Your experience in South Africa suggests to me that the woodcrete might be plenty durable over time, if portland cement and wood shavings are comparable to mud and grass in strength. Wild to think about, since we stress so much in carpentry about engineering and think that our structures are superior to mud and grass.

Regarding natural furniture, all I can think of is live edge furniture. Thats keeping the shape of the tree rather than milling into dimensional lumber. I've done 3 benches like that recently, out of logs that were too bent up to make good shingles. Alder trucks for legs. I'll have to think to take some pictures for the site. There was a guy in my class who was obsessed with that sort of technique, combined with epoxy and rocks to make a sort of river or beach water surface in the middle of a slab. Oh there's another term, slab wood furniture.

Great to be talking,

Cheers,

Forrest
 
kate Desjardins
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hi Forrest.  Thank  you for all of your references to papers and articles on woodcrete.  I have read them all.  However, i am probably even more confused now than before.  Each of the references used a different method of making woodcrete.  Some used perilite, some sawdust, some not, some lye, and urea.  Do you mind me asking you what you have found to be successful.
Kathy
 
Forrest Little
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Hi Kate,

Re woodcrete ingredients:

That article, http://www.themoldstore.info/concrete_formulas.html, references perlite but is a general formula for any light weight concrete, just switch out perlite for the sawdust or chips.

That article was the one Eric read to figure out what to use. For us, using doug fir sawdust from the bandsaw, we're doing half the recipe: 8 gallons of water, 47 lb bag of cement and 18 gallons of sawdust, (three and a half 5 gallon buckets of sawdust). Fresh or dry sawdust. The really old sawdust which is more like dirt on the ground, thats going to need less water.. With drier sawdust you might need a bit more water.

For clarity, we're using half the concrete in the above recipe on that perlite link, arrived at by experimentation. Also we're not adding sand. If we added sand, it would be able to be finished, but our sandless stuff is impossible to finish, ie, grind down or smooth out while wet. The way we do it its great for wall fill and subfloor.  Keep in mind it takes an extended drying period. If you use twice the concrete like they say, much speedier process.

Now this is all for sawdust. For yardwaste chippings like fir branches, it might need less water. We dont mind the fir needles either. Also we use other yardwaste chippings, which behave differently, needing more or less water.

Hope that helps

Forrest
 
Forrest Little
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Hi Gordon,

We've been talking about some of the issues you raised with water tanks. Thank you for your comments.

Regarding the woodcrete tanks being porous for potable water. We're thinking a food grade potable water liner inside the tank would be the best bet.

Regarding a tank for non potable water, or approaching a potable water solution, we could use our forms for concrete, remove the forms and then possibly add a bio sand filter component for extra safety. Anything we would be doing with woodcrete would have that commercial plastic potable liner.

We're not really working with with epoxy so we havent achieved it either. But we are interested in doing epoxy doors.

Thanks again for your comments.

Forrest
 
Gordon Haverland
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While I think epoxy tanks are doable, if you go looking at the boat industry you seldom see epoxy potable water tanks.  You do see water tanks (not necessarily in boats) made of phenolic, and phenolic should bond better to wood (or at least the lignin part) better than epoxy.  Regardless of resin system, a big reason for using glass  with the resin, is to allow you to build up a reasonable thickness of resin.  If the resin wets the glass, that is.

I've been thinking of liners for wine/beer/....  Some of the fluorinated plastics look interesting for that.  At least a couple of them have been used for "roofing" of stadia (removable roofs).

Woodcrete will probably always be somewhat porous to water vapour, short of sealing the surface that is.  It seems likely that if you have a fair amount of wood "fines" in woodcrete, that it probably holds liquid water.  All the wood will swell when moist, sealing up most of the pores.

I suppose a way to test things, would be to make a small test system where the wood was black walnut, and put some susceptible (to juglones) plants right next to the tank.  If water leaks through the tank walls, the juglones will start affecting the plants next to the tank.  Or another way would be to add something fluourescent to the water, and then shine a black light on the outside walls after a while (when dark).
 
kate Desjardins
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Forrest....  Thank you so much for the clarification.  i believe i have it now, and am really looking forward to  many building projects with it.....

Keep building..............
 
Lito George
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Gordon Haverland wrote: Regardless of resin system, a big reason for using glass  with the resin, is to allow you to build up a reasonable thickness of resin.  If the resin wets the glass, that is.



Hi Gordon, interesting links - I hope you respond to my query on the Acacia.

However, your statement about the composites quoted here is incorrect. Polyester/ Epoxy Resins (weaker/stronger by far) are weak in of themselves and rather brittle, particularly over time. Layers, shaping and thread direction of EGlass/ Fibreglass/ Kevlar/ Carbon Fibre are actually what provide the strength/ rigidity/ abrasion resistance depending on what you're using.

If the glass is not wetted properly by the resin, it is be the weak link in the chain. Too much resin vs composite will also cause weakness in the substrate.

My experience with the above spans about 35 years, and have made custom specialist components in a variety of composites.


 
Josephine Howland
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Dear Forrest,

Just wondering, since we are living in a single wide Mobile home (which I planned to be temporary, but now seems permanent) do you think we could attach a round or dome home to the mobile home. Being a single wide it really needs a bit more room. There is one area that is meant to be the living room and dining room, and it's just too small. We also need more pantry room. At the moment, our back bedroom is being use as pantry, freezer space, storage for all the canning supplies. It's taking up space that could be used as a bedroom (since I'm a serial adopter we have 14 grandchildren, without me ever giving birth). Plus my husband is deathly ill. Four years ago a doctor only gave him about a year to live. So it will most likely come a time when I will need to get a roommate to help with expenses.  Or have grandchildren   stay with me in the summer to help with chores.  I bought a shed 32 x 14, on a mobile home trailer, that I thought we could attach to the house, but my husband and others seem to thing that it's an impossible task. My nine year old grandson agrees with me at least.



 
Gordon Haverland
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I may not have used the words you would use Lito, but I would still stand by my proposition.  That if the object was to store water in woodcrete, that a glass/polymer layer applied to the surface and properly cured would probably work, and my first thought was a phenolic resin.  More people have heard of epoxy (and probably even more of polyester), so I was trying to draw on that body of knowledge to explain things.
 
Forrest Little
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Hi Josephine,

Thank you for your question.  

First thing that comes to mind is maybe it would be best to use the shed space for things that do not need to be heated and leave it separate, because then you wouldnt have to mess with permits.

A monolithic dome "ecoshell" is a small shed available on monolithicmarketplace.com, but its a kit that is essentially an inflatable bag they spray with concrete to get the dome, and still needs fasteners and foundation. Its also vastly smaller than the shed you've got, 8×10, so doesnt really go far to solving the issue. Maybe contact them also to see if they have some ideas.

Our method could work, the block would be that you'd have to find people to do it and currently no one is trained and we dont travel. We've attached to wooden walls with a curved wall as an interface to the round building. Basically we nailed a board the thickness of the wall we wanted to a stud on the corner of the house, then attached our woodcrete forms to that and poured woodcrete right up against the stud on the house, between house and the round building we built next to the house. There are some pictures on our site. Then the round roof needs to be interfaced in some way with your current roof, and the correct flashing for waterproofing will be a must. Once things are attached you'd need to cut away the existing wall betwen the two buildings, likely at one end or the other of your home.  Our woodcrete requires extensive curing time so it needs to be fully cured before the wall is cut away. We are currently in the process of doing this, with a work in progress building connected to the house but the wall to be cut out is still there. You would possibly want to reinforce whatever wall you attached to, with extra framing.

It would be unlikely you'd find a carpenter to do something like this, as its way outside the box, as they say. Plus a significant labor cost would be involved, even if you had a local saw mill cut the lumber like we do in thin strips and cutting out the blocks for the roof, the shingles, etc.. We havent done something like that but a mid range estimate might be 35k if we were doing that for a customer. Who knows what a miraculously open minded builder would charge for something similar. Currently we arent really connected with other round builders, but it would be worth it to contact others even if they're not in your area to see if they know of people who are in your area. If you've got any interested adult people around, it would probably be cheaper to send them to a 5 quarter trade school and then have them come back and do it for ya to save labor costs.

Regarding health stuff. Please disregard any of this if its outside your worldview, simply my shotgun approach I share with everyone who mentions health. Wanted to make sure you were aware of doctoryourself.com, a great source for diy megavitamin therapy including high doses of vitamin c; fasting with Dr Jason Fung, a Canadian kidney specialist curing people's insulin resistance with intermittent and continuous fasting; Earthing.com, source for electromagnetic grounding info, anti-inflamatory practice; and ketogenic diet, specifically the book Primal Body Primal Mind, all about the importance of dietary fat from animals and the risks associated with sugar. Also Psych-K, brain hemisphere synchronization, similar to the effect of prayer or meditation. I mention these whenever anyone brings up health stuff. I totally get it if any of that might be outside of your worldview, but if any of that happens to be useful I wanted to share, as health is my other main interest.

Thank you again for your message.

Cheers

Forrest






 
Josephine Howland
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Forrest Little wrote:Hi Josephine,



Regarding health stuff. Please disregard any of this if its outside your worldview, simply my shotgun approach I share with everyone who mentions health. Wanted to make sure you were aware of doctoryourself.com, a great source for diy megavitamin therapy including high doses of vitamin c; fasting with Dr Jason Fung, a Canadian kidney specialist curing people's insulin resistance with intermittent and continuous fasting; Earthing.com, source for electromagnetic grounding info, anti-inflamatory practice; and ketogenic diet, specifically the book Primal Body Primal Mind, all about the importance of dietary fat from animals and the risks associated with sugar. Also Psych-K, brain hemisphere synchronization, similar to the effect of prayer or meditation. I mention these whenever anyone brings up health stuff. I totally get it if any of that might be outside of your worldview, but if any of that happens to be useful I wanted to share, as health is my other main interest.

Thank you again for your message.

Cheers

Forrest

Dear Forrest Thank you for your health resources. My husband's illness is rather rare. Some how the nerve to his diaphragm has been severed. The diaphragm is paralyzed up, so his right lung can't inflate. Therefore, it fills with gunk, and because of years of hacking the gunk up, the opening of the lung to the trachea is collapsing. We went to Boston to see the Worlds best Thoracic surgeons, who have invented a stent that is inserted into the trachea to hold it open. Unfortunately, when they tried to insert the stent, it could not reach far enough into his lung opening to reach where his is collapsing. Adding to the fact that his mother was a chain smoker, his lungs are damaged beyond repair. We do grow a lot of our own food, and cook from scratch, eating lots of veggies, etc. But this is more of a physical damage, then just  healthy lifestyle living.

 
Forrest Little
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Hi Josephine,

You're so welcome. Judging from what you said, vitamin c to bowel tolerance http://www.doctoryourself.com/titration.html and sleeping on a grounding mat from earthing.com would be likely useful in responding to the oxidative damage associated with a lung situation. I've got my parents, a grandparent, and myself using these tools for very positive results for chronic pain and immune system stuff. At the very least worth looking into. Its part of what we're doing with the buildings too, trying to mitigate oxidative damage by having grounded floors.

Cheers,

Forrest
 
pollinator
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Maybe tangential, but your mention of "using wide roof over hangs as auxilary space" reminded me of the traditional Japanese house as described in 'Just Enough' by Asby Brown (may have been discussed in a Permies podcast sometime back).  But it is totaly square :)  And also, 'hempcrete' ... hmmm
 
Lito George
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Forrest Little wrote:Hi Lito,

Great to be talking,

Cheers,

Forrest



Great to be talking too mate. I'll be bookmarking this and if the opportunity comes to further explore a meetup, I'm going to contact you. Look forward to seeing what you're up to now, and what you'll do now that spring is here (essentially)

All the best, George
 
Forrest Little
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Hi Lito,

That sounds great. I look forward to it.

Best,

Forrest



Hi Nancy

Thank you for the recommendation. I will look into Azby brown. Speaking of hempcrete, I'm also very curious about nettlecrete.

Best,

Forrest

 
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