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Guerrilla Gardening in the Graveyard  RSS feed

 
gardener
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Location: SW Missouri
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Disclaimer, in case you are all excited, I didn't plant near the graves!  :)

The rental we live in backs up to two graveyards, and we consider them our own personal park. There's almost never anyone there, other people maintain the grass and roads, flowers to look at, headstones to read, we like it. Nice quiet neighbors :D

The edges of the graveyard are overgrown in some areas, that's where I went today with seeds and a turning fork, and two chicken assistants. I planted winter squashes and swisschard. The chaos will overrun that area soon, I won't see the results till next fall, but there might be some surprise squash ready to pick then. I deliberately put all of this where animals can eat it too, where the squash can climb trees, where it's wettest, and looks like it will have the most sun. Squash varieties are: Acorn, butternut, seminole pumpkin, spaghetti squash and a big one (15 pounds or so) I don't know the name of but liked a lot. I figure if I either get some of the squash, or it feed the animals enough that they don't strip my garden, I'll call it a win. I also seeded chard down the outside of the fence line, right where the woodchuck has a path. I found his burrow back in the mess, and planted him some chard on his front porch too.

This chaotic little area now has squash and chard to run amok in it!
Mwah hah hah hah hah!!!



Not to be confused with gorilla gardening, I don't look quite this bad today, I have a cuter outfit on :D

 
Posts: 322
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
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I guess you'll never have a problem with fertiliser, especially blood & bone!



 
Posts: 654
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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My concern would be regarding the embalming fluid and how/if it biodegrades. Since it is designed to be toxic to living things (which is why the bodies are pumped full of it in the first place) I'd be a little weary of anything down hill from the grave sites.

There seems to be quite a bit online about how environmentally friendly Formaldehyde is, and how it breaks down quickly in the soil. I really don't know how that can be when it is so good at killing microorganisms in things like animal hides (leather making) and embalming. It's certainly worth doing a deep dive into the research to see if this is a legit risk factor or the claims being made by the funeral industry are legit.
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 1988
Location: SW Missouri
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All of my planting is 50 feet uphill of any graves. I'm more careful than that :)
If it wasn't, this place requires vaults etc. It's pretty horrifying, I doubt anyone ever decomposes, I wouldn't want to be buried here (or any normal graveyard, in a coffin etc, ugh.)
I don't like or trust formaldehyde. Wouldn't have planted anyplace that was exposed to it.
The amok mess I planted in is overgrown trees, bushes, vines, etc. It's impassable by June. Pretty difficult now, I needed a guy with a machete ahead of me :)
 
gardener
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Pearl;   ??? You NEEDED a guy in front of you, wielding a machete …  was he shirtless as well ???  and of course you followed behind to watch out for his safety???  RIGHT...
Cool idea planting there.  The residents won't complain and the wood chuck and others will help enjoy the bounty!
 
Pearl Sutton
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thomas rubino wrote:Pearl;   ??? You NEEDED a guy in front of you, wielding a machete …  was he shirtless as well ???  and of course you followed behind to watch out for his safety???  RIGHT...
Cool idea planting there.  The residents won't complain and the wood chuck and others will help enjoy the bounty!



Well, if he was shirtless, the cat brier, blackberries and gooseberrys would have definitely made him unsafe.  

And hey, I can fantasize :D Wonder if he'll move a bunch of heavy stuff for me too...

Yeah, I liked it for location. I'm hoping the wildlife will be less interested in my garden. And they need to eat too. I thought putting some on the woodchucks spoil pile in front of his hole was a nice touch ;)
 
garden master
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What is the recommended planting depth for gorillas? Mine haven't sprouted yet.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Mike Barkley wrote:What is the recommended planting depth for gorillas? Mine haven't sprouted yet.


They are tropical, you are in zone 7, your soil isn't warm enough yet. I hope they don't rot before they warm up enough to sprout. If they do rot, rotted gorilla is good compost :)

Planting depth for gorillas depends on whether you planted them horizontally or vertically. How deep did you dig?

:D
 
pollinator
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Mike Barkley wrote:What is the recommended planting depth for gorillas? Mine haven't sprouted yet.


They are tropical, you are in zone 7, your soil isn't warm enough yet. I hope they don't rot before they warm up enough to sprout. If they do rot, rotted gorilla is good compost :)

Planting depth for gorillas depends on whether you planted them horizontally or vertically. How deep did you dig?

:D



Personally, I think they will be better as a greenhouse crop, in permanent, so as to not have to dig them up, and bring them indoors, seasonally. They do tend to be a bit top - heavy, at maturity, so be sure to compensate for that, with a much heavier pot, to mitigate tippage.
 
gardener
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Since it's gone this way anyway, you may recall what happened to the funny looking guy in Fargo. Then you don't need to worry about planting depth.:-)

I'm sorry, but I wouldn't feel safe being your accomplice in this crime.
Screenshot_2019-04-16-21-24-05-1.png
[Thumbnail for Screenshot_2019-04-16-21-24-05-1.png]
Margie- and I guess that was your accomplice in the wood chipper"
Screenshot_2019-04-16-21-24-27-1.png
[Thumbnail for Screenshot_2019-04-16-21-24-27-1.png]
 
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