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Growing Horseradish Naturally

 
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I wanted to make this thread to help me keep track of and document growing my horseradish, with hopefully minimal work and maximum harvests!

They won't be irrigated, fertilized, or sprayed with anything, not even organic fertilizers or sprays, just naturally healthy soil, rain and sunshine! With minimal care, they can be truly enjoyed to the fullest! Bring on the yummy harvests!

Hopefully it can be helpful to others also!

If you'd like to stay up to date with the latest videos of what I'm growing and see monthly food forest tours, you can subscribe to my Youtube channel HERE by clicking the red subscribe button! I'd love to have you join me for this journey!
 
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Hi Steve,

This is a horseradish I planted a couple of years ago.  I haven't done anything with it yet.
IMG_8741.JPG
horseradish flower
Bolting Horse
 
Steve Thorn
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I planted these horseradish from root cuttings.

They have started coming up and have some smaller leaves forming in the middle.

I love horseradish and the strong kick it has, and am excited to have some to use with cocktail sauce and shrimp soon!

Does anyone else have any good uses for horseradish?

Here are some of the plants coming up.
Horseradish-leaf-with-two-holes.jpg
Horseradish leaf with two holes
Horseradish leaf with two holes
Young-horseradish-plant.jpg
Young horseradish plant
Young horseradish plant
 
Steve Thorn
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That horseradish looks great Scott!

Have you planted any from seed?
 
Scott Foster
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Thanks, Steve.  

I have not planted horseradish from seed but I would.  I purchased this plant as a baby organic plant from a local Cidery.  The radish is planted in a heavy deer browse area, they actually bed down just on the other side of the hugel mound.  I have currants that are two years old and they look like seedlings.  :)

If you plant from seed it will just take a little longer to get established.  Maybe?   For me, most perennials don't gain footing until the second spring.  I planted asparagus from seed last spring and it is very delicate.



 
Scott Foster
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Horseradish and baked ham!

100 uses for horseradish
 
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Young green leaves are nice in salads and edible flowers look nice and tasty
 
Steve Thorn
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The leaves are getting big on the horseradish.
Horseradish-leaves.jpg
Horseradish leaves
Horseradish leaves
 
Steve Thorn
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Most of the horseradish got pretty big last year. I really like how they live through most of the winter also. Hope they flower soon!
20201004_155757.jpg
Wide horseradish plant
Wide horseradish plant
Horseradish-leaves.jpg
Horseradish leaves
Horseradish leaves
20201004_160009.jpg
Horseradish among the polyculture
Horseradish among the polyculture
 
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I remember this one time when my partner wanted to make mayonnaise (she's from Belgium, after all) but we had no mustard. So I said, "Wait, doesn't horseradish contain a lot of the same substances as mustard seed?" We got some roots, grated them, mixed with vinegar, and used as a base for mayonnaise. It wasn't exactly the same thing, but not too far off, and quite tasty. Further experiments might improve it.
 
Steve Thorn
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The horseradish is really liking the better drained soil recently and is looking super healthy and putting on a lot of new growth.
20210419_165550.jpg
Healthy horseradish
Healthy horseradish
 
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After many years without horseradish we planted some in our new allotment - a neighbour gifted us some plant cuttings. We planted it near the potatoes as supposedly they keep off wireworms.

The horseradish itself is widely used in Central Europe. Not only for fish (especially smoked fish), but also cold cuts like roastbeef, for roast veal, or as an addition to pickles.
 
Steve Thorn
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That sounds really good Anita, definitely going to give horseradish a try on those. I love the flavor and intensity of horseradish and was trying to think of new things to add it on, thanks for the tips!
 
Steve Thorn
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The horseradish is getting really big and is looking super healthy this year!
20210429_182356.jpg
Big and healthy horseradish
Big and healthy horseradish
 
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I planted a vigorous horseradish root many years ago in my main garden behind our garage in Parkman, Wyoming. Each harvest at least one root would break underground and become an enormous plant the next year. The plant spread and took over the whole garden, to the point of growing under the garage perimeter wall. It took an excavator that reached over 13 feet to dig it out of the garden. I had even resorted to round up which did not work. I plant mine in pots these days. Love love love horseradish! Have fun!
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