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Permie dehumidifier idea

 
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In another thread on dehumidifiers I mentioned coming up with a permie dehumidifier.  My situation is a house without air conditioning in a climate that can get quite humid and only gets excessively hot about 10 days a year.  Chris came up with this concept:

Chris Kott wrote:As to a permie dehumidifier, I would take an old rad and a drip tray and run well water or river water through it, or water from the mains. Once the rad heats up to the point that it needs a refresh, the water gets dumped into the grey water system, and the rad water refreshed. If a slow fan blows air over the exchanger, it becomes a cooler as well.

-CK


I'm interpreting "rad" to be a big cast iron radiator.  And I'd definitely want the fan both for cooling and to get as much damn humidity out of the air as possible.

I don't have lake or river water available but I do have a well.  My first thought was to use a smaller radiator like from a car.  Then have the cold well water trickling through it at the minimum speed needed to still be condensing as it leaves the radiator.  Set the radiator and fan above the sink in the laundry room and get the water from that faucet.  Then the condensate can just drip in the sink.  The warmed well water could be routed to a bucket and taken outside for use.  Or it could be rigged up to a tube that runs outside to a place that needs water.

Added feature would be to include a place for the free range chickens to get a drink.  Problem for me is that there isn't a place near the laundry room that needs that much irrigation.

Building off this idea would be a radiator that hooks to a toilet.  When you flush, the 1.6 gallon radiator drains its warm water down into the toilet tank and is replenished with cold well water.  A fan kicks on to condense water over the cold radiator.  Issue would be that the first bit of water into the radiator wouldn't be cold, especially if you have a pressure tank in your plumbing system.

Any other nifty ideas out there?
 
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The radiator thing I've seen done in an Instructibles.
They were going for cooling more than dehumidification.
I like your toilet idea, it uses up the "cooleth" in batches,less waste that way.
No matter what,  we want to use all that water/electric/cooleth more than once.
Direct irrigation, or a storage tank(pool?pond?)for future use seems like a good idea.

I've seen people skybluing about using heat renewable dessicants, a known technology  and using thermal solar power as the renewing heat source.

Air to earth thermal storage systems rely on the relative cool of deep soil to condense water out of the air,  taking the heat with it.
Often touted for their ability to heat a structure like a greenhouse, they can be used for cooling and dehumidifing as well.
Unlike earthtubes, they avoid the dangers of mold and mildew by being perforated.
The condensation is absorbed into the earth,  and the native soil organisms easily out compete molds and mildews in that environment.

So maybe bring in air via perforated earth tubes, through a renewable desiccant filter and past a well water cooled radiator.
The constant positive pressure of chilled dried air could help keep out the humid outside air.
 
Mike Haasl
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Good ideas William!  Are there renewable desiccants that would work on this scale?  I got a big container of DampRid a year ago to try to dry out a seed storage cabinet.  It didn't drop the humidity at all.  So I put it in the bathroom where it's plenty moist and it barely picked up any water.  My electric dehumidifier is collecting 1-3 gallons of water a day.  I'm imagining we'd need a 55 gallon drum of desiccant to collect that amount of water.  And then to redry the desiccant would take a lot of energy/work.  But I know I'm ill-informed about the subject so hopefully my conjecture is all wrong.

I like the underground system for a situation where you can dig up your yard (or new construction).  I also like that for low grade heat for things like chicken coops.

And I like the idea of bringing in dried and/or cooled down outside air to keep the warm humid air out whenever we open a door or turn on a vent fan...

Just drawing air in from a shady place outside could be a good feed source if a tube system couldn't be buried.
 
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