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pollinator
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA - Zone 6b
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Scott Stiller wrote:Very interesting Ryan!



I forgot to mention that hornworms prefer tobacco over tomatoes, and it's the hornworms that injure the tobacco in the wild resulting in the waspocalypse.
 
gardener
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We need to remember that tobacco can be very toxic to our helpers as well, particularly the bees. It would be one thing to have simply grown a few plants along with a field of other plants, and a totally different thing to use modern equipment to process and spread tobacco juice to places nature wouldn't. Just because nature makes something, doesn't mean that it's a good idea for humans to use that substance in unnatural ways. (Just ask someone who accidentally ate the wrong mushroom!)
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
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Jay Angler wrote:We need to remember that tobacco can be very toxic to our helpers as well, particularly the bees. It would be one thing to have simply grown a few plants along with a field of other plants, and a totally different thing to use modern equipment to process and spread tobacco juice to places nature wouldn't. Just because nature makes something, doesn't mean that it's a good idea for humans to use that substance in unnatural ways. (Just ask someone who accidentally ate the wrong mushroom!)



That's true, and I would only use it judiciously. Never on flowering plants during the bloom. I actually have about 1 lb of tobacco leaves for medicinal use. A poultice of it is an oldtimer cure for bee stings. I have used it on boils with some success. Plus the wasp attracting thing is cool.
 
pollinator
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I grew tobacco one year. There were a few friends that still smoked and I wanted to try it without chemicals. I had no idea that all of God’s creatures loved tobacco! That was a weird but informative year. I would tell you how I ended up doing that but it would require a thread all to itself! 🤣
 
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Location: Russia, ~250m altitude, zone 6a, Moscow oblast, in the greater Sergeiv Posad reigon.
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
I use a brix meter in my garden. I have heard the claim that high brix foods taste better. The amount of sugar in a food is only part of the story about how sweet it tastes... For example with watermelons, it seems to me, like the chemicals responsible for the red color taste bitter. Therefore to taste sweet, a red watermelon has to be high sugar. Yellow fleshed watermelons do not taste bitter to me. Therefore, they can be lower sugar, and still taste subjectively sweeter than a red-fleshed watermelon. These days I am selecting only for yellow-fleshed watermelons. I'm moving my tomatoes towards yellow/orange types, for the same reason. The sweetest tasting cucumber I ever ate was extremely low brix. It's skin was yellow, so it lacked whatever bitterness components are associated with green skin.


    The theory about brix is that more nutrient dense crops have more energy, so they can make more sugar. So, the higher the brix compared to the usual for that variety, the more nutritious. this would be why they taste better. Probably, a special higher brix variety of corn is not appreciably more nutrient dense, however. In this case, more sugar is not bad, because it comes with all the minerals the body needs to handle it.
 
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