Win a copy of Herbal Medicine From the Heart of the Earth this week in the Medicinal Herbs forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • paul wheaton
garden masters:
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Mike Barkley

Permaculture in Space

 
Posts: 66
Location: South East Kansas
5
trees books cooking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So I was thinking the other day about space and science fiction. One series came to mind called Babylon 5. (Google Babylon 5 for more information about the show). One of the issues in the show was making oxygen. So the inside of the station was a big green area for "oxygen reclamation". This is the only show or series I have seen in which this is shown. If there is another please let me know. In the future I think the need for a plant based solution will be require to solving what machines can not do. Create oxygen and food cheaply. Therefore permaculture would be the answer.
 
gardener
Posts: 1573
Location: Southern Illinois
288
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
T.,

I don’t know about any other series, but B5 was one of my favorite science fiction shows ever.  It was truly a revolutionary series in that it based itself on an arc structure, something unheard of for the time but common place today.

Great question.  I am always pleased to hear references to B5.

Eric
 
gardener
Posts: 2923
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
621
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The book series dune is based on a sand planet with very little water. The fremen wear stillsuits that reclaim the water from their sweat, urine, and feces. A straw comes out of the suit to drink it.

They close in the caves to keep moisture from escaping.

They have wind traps that catch dew as well as physically collecting dew each morning from the few plants.

They are turning this waterless planet into a planet with water in a several hundred year timeframe.

The water is harvested from the dead. Instead of a phrase like "i am gonna kill you" they say "i will take your water".



 
T Blankinship
Posts: 66
Location: South East Kansas
5
trees books cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

wayne fajkus wrote:The book series dune is based on a sand planet with very little water. The fremen wear stillsuits that reclaim the water from their sweat, urine, and feces. A straw comes out of the suit to drink it.

They close in the caves to keep moisture from escaping.

They have wind traps that catch dew as well as physically collecting dew each morning from the few plants.

They are turning this waterless planet into a planet with water in a several hundred year timeframe.

The water is harvested from the dead. Instead of a phrase like "i am gonna kill you" they say "i will take your water".



Yes. I forgot about Dune. I have read the first book and I hope someday to read the series.
 
Eric Hanson
gardener
Posts: 1573
Location: Southern Illinois
288
transportation cat dog fungi trees building writing rocket stoves woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not exactly permaculture, but the series The Expanse portrays ships that have plants growing in dedicated compartments in walls for the purpose of recycling oxygen.

Eric
 
pollinator
Posts: 1537
Location: northern California
156
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Herbert's "Dune" is a profound and important book, well ahead of it's time in terms of ecology theory.  Essentially the entire planet is conceived of as one ecosystem, with key leverage points of intervention.  Once a particular threshold of water capture and storage takes place, the ecosystem is supposed to pass a tipping point and shift dramatically into a much moister state.  This is in 1968, mind you....well before the Gaia Hypothesis or any of the now familiar thinking around climate change and tipping points.  It is also noteworthy to mention, too, that Frank Herbert and Paul Stamets were next-door neighbors in Washington state.  Maybe some ecological ideas crossed the property line...
 
The world's cheapest jedi mind trick: "Aw c'mon, why not read this tiny ad?"
Clean With Cleaners You Can Eat by Raven Ranson
https://permies.com/t/edible-clean
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!