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Hugelbeet?

 
pollinator
Posts: 194
Location: NorCal
58
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I left the gate to my garden open the other day, and my chickens had a field day!  I have been unsatisfied with my strawberry bed for a while, but had enough success that I didn't want to remove the Strawberry's that survived.  Problem solved.  Once the chickens were done I managed to save 2 plants.  
It was one of those 3 or 4 inch 4X4 wood raised bed frames I got on clearance a few years ago.  I put weed cloth down and filled it with cheap soil.  Since I have added organic soil, compost, and a bunch of other stuff I thought it needed( organic fertilizer, rock dust, ECT)
I saved the soil. Removed the weed cloth.  Dug down about a foot.  Put a layer of old fire wood, then soil.  Watered that in added 1+ year old wood chips actually looks and smells like soil, but maybe not quite there.  Added native soil, then mixed in rock dust, azamite,  organic compost,  Dr. Earth organic fertilizer, and organic chicken manure.  Also perlite, I would have rather added vermiculite, but I didn't have any, and I was worried about how hard and compact our soil gets.  (Before permies I was told perlite and vermiculite where pretty much the same things, so I bought what was cheaper.  I know better now and won't buy perlite again, but money is very tight, so I use what I have).   For now I will plant garlic, spinach, and lettuce.  I hope this will be an improvement on what I had before.  If it does well I will do the same with the other beds.  Now I have to remember to close the garden gate. Poor chickens.
 
gardener
Posts: 511
Location: Piedmont 7a
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Will be interesting to see if the plants need less water in the Hugelbeet!
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11653
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
866
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I put buried wood under my entire kitchen garden and it helped tremendously with moisture retention.  Oak and Elm seem to have been the most beneficial.  Juniper logs just sit there without rotting.

https://permies.com/t/52077/Buried-Wood-Beds
 
Jen Fulkerson
pollinator
Posts: 194
Location: NorCal
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I'm at it again.  I had a raised bed that I put in this spring.  I made lots of mistakes and between that and the weather nothing in this bed did well.  I attempted 3 sisters and added sunflowers.  The sunflowers were the only thing that did well.  It was so crowded, and I had it to close to the fence, so the Bermuda grass managed to creep in and take hold.  Long story short I decided to redo the whole thing.  This time I left the weed cloth on the bottom and I doubled the height.  Now it is two cinder blocks high.  Filled the bottom with old wood chunks from an old bay leaf tree, then soil, new wood chips, soil, corn stalks and bean vine, soil, one year old wood chips, and finished it off with about 6" of soil, with some organic chicken manure, compost and a little organic fertilizer, and rock dust mixed in. I watered between each layer.
I'm going to plant onions, lettuces, and maybe some bush peas.  We will see how it goes.
 
Posts: 45
Location: Georgia, USA
7
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About 7 years ago - I built a 2 block high bed huglekultur. Wood in the bottom, then soil. First year I planted summer squash. Bumper crop! Everything does great in that bed! And at age 78, I enjoy sitting on the edge to plant, weed and harvest. A aging in place solution. I have had to top it off as the the wood decomposes.
 
Jen Fulkerson
pollinator
Posts: 194
Location: NorCal
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My brother in law did all his raised beds with double cinder blocks. I loved it, but knew I couldn't afford it.  My garden is a miss mash of things.  One is made using a wood frame for a twin size bed.  I'm sure my niece thought I was a total nut when I asked if I could have it, and dragged it off the truck bound for the dump.  It has made a very nice raised bed, and lasted longer than I thought it would.   2 beds are from a kit 4x4x2. I got those on clearance for 5$. I didn't think they were deep enough, so I added fence board to the top.  3 are made from cinder blocks.  Two are 1 block high in a octagon shape. This let me put them corner to corner to get more planting space with less blocks.  Last is my newest on 3'x5' double cinder block high.  I didn't do it this way originally because the blocks are cheap, but still add up, but mostly it was knowing how much soil I would need to fill it.  But now that I know about using wood it's a win win.  Buy less soil, and get all the benefits the wood will give.  This is now my favorite bed!  So much easier to use.  I know what I'm asking for my birthday.   My family already know I' m strange, this year I asked for and got a hog panel to make a trellis with.
 
gardener
Posts: 1019
Location: South of Capricorn
331
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I love it. I used parts of my daughter's old kid bed to shore up a garden bed on a downhill- makes me smile every time I see it.
(there is also a path where I throw all my broken dishware, because mugs and cups break. Some are special, but every time I go to feed the rabbits I get to see their parts among the gravel.) Repurposing for the win!
 
I've read about this kind of thing at the checkout counter. That's where I met this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
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