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Rockets that are hard to start

 
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Location: Portugal
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transportation gear earthworks solar rocket stoves
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In and around the various RMH-type projects that have been discussed is mention that some are hard to start:  for example, if you build in long under-floor flues.  This I imagine is due to the inertia of all the cold gas in the flues.

While responding to another post (I'm sure you can find it) I mentioned forced draft stoves using a fan - and while typing that it occurred to me that this might be a solution for the marginal rocket installations which are hard to start - fit a forced draft fan which you run for just long enough to get the gas flowing though the system and get the rocket going - probably would only need mebbe 30 seconds or a minute.  Kinda like how in the old days you used to use a bellows to start your fire, but more efficient.

I daresay it's already been mentioned, but I thought I should say it while I'd thought of it.
 
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft elevation
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I've done it Austin. In my previous workshop.

Very simple way. I scavenged a metallic fan from a restaurant fridge at the dump yard. Wired that above the chimney, on the very top. Under the cap, and pulled an electrical line down to the workshop. With a switch.
 
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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Anyone know why these chimney fans cost as much as a new wood stove?

https://www.amazon.com/Enervex-Fan-Chimney-RS-9-12/dp/B00NU9EWEI
 
                              
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Location: Northern panhandle of West Virginia
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So I have an issue starting mine I think it's the wood I get the paper in and burning and that's it it starts drawing and no more fire. I tried trouble shooting it lit tea light candles placed them in the burn chamber and it has such a good draw. The cold air whipping threw and it blows the candles out. Mind you it is about 40 degrees Fahrenheit in this area. What could remedy this issue? What is this that is happening?
 
Satamax Antone
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Hi James.

The first trick, if you have good draw, you make a fence of sticks; no bigger than your pinky;  vertical on the burn tunnel side. Hold these with your left hand, while you stuff newspaper balls behind, to hold the sticks. Then light the paper. If this doesn't light the sticks, your wood is too wet i would think. No more than three paper balls, the size of a big egg. You might have to blow on it at this point, to get the fire going the right way.

One trick that i use, on a cold stove, paper, and methylated spirit (burning alcohol) . Never ever attempt that on a hot stove.

When your sticks are burning, they will fall back towards the feed tube front edge. Then you slide more sticks on top of the burning ones.

When it's been going a while, 10/15 minutes, raise the sticks and stuff the whole feed tube with other sticks. At this stage, i would say, no more than 2 inch in diameter, smaller is better. And remember to leave a bit of air passage between square sticks.

When you have an ember bed, which doesn't block the burn tunnel, you can go for bigger pieces. If the coal bed raise too much, let it burn a bit more, so it turns to ashes. With a few embers. Then feed again. Until you have charged your mass enough.
 
                              
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Location: Northern panhandle of West Virginia
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Satamax Antone wrote:Hi James.

The first trick, if you have good draw, you make a fence of sticks; no bigger than your pinky;  vertical on the burn tunnel side. Hold these with your left hand, while you stuff newspaper balls behind, to hold the sticks. Then light the paper. If this doesn't light the sticks, your wood is too wet i would think. .



I was figuring it was too wet. Well here's to burning pallets.
 
                              
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Location: Northern panhandle of West Virginia
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Got it to start I used one of those fire starter things. 50¢+ tax each had to buy a box and I had to relight the fire starter  twice but hey 3rd times the charm. Took it 10 minutes to start burning the wood but I'm glad I can see where it leaks. I will have heat this winter yay me.
 
All of the following truths are shameless lies. But what about this tiny ad:
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
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