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What to feed Molly the moose calf?

 
gardener
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Hi all;
We have a new Mastiff puppy. The Moose calf .  Paws the size of a cougar and leg bones as thick as ,well ,a moose!
Her real name is Molly. Or  more often she is MOLLY NO !!!
She came to us eating  "ewww" Purina puppy chow.
We need a better quality kibble for our new family member!
After checking around ,we discovered there is "large" breed puppy chows (for up to #100 adult)  Or Giant breed puppy chow for up to #200+ ... Who knew?
Is there really that big a nutrient requirement difference, between a #100 German Shepard and a #150 Mastiff ? Is it just the kibble size?  Do these foods really fill those requirements ?  
Would the large breed food be fine for my giant breed?  

Anybody out there with giant pup experience?  
 
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Molly 11 weeks old
 
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The premium foods have the right ratios of nutrients.
IE I got told off by my vet for giving my puppy milk as well as the kibble because he may get too much calcium and grow too quickly.
Big dogs growing too quickly equals hip dysplasia, weak joints and bones apparently.
Not good.
I always buy the premium food usually Eukanuba.
My pups always grow out well.
The cheap foods are mostly just grains as fillers.
Generally you get what you pay for....
 
pollinator
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Molly is gorgeous. I second Drew's caution. The largest dog I have ever owned was a hundred pounds of golden retriever. I was at close proximity to the growth and development of a Grand Dane (a pretentious name for the giant side of the Great Dane breed), though, who ended up topping him neatly, and not by a narrow margin, either, and I can tell you that their growth profiles are radically different. Great caution is indicated, or there could be problems throughout her entire life.

Thanks for the pics. More please! Keep up the good work, keep us posted, and good luck!

(Hi Molly!)

-CK
 
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If you don’t mind a little work and want to control what is in your dog’s diet, you might like to try Dr. Fox’s homemade dog food recipe. I have used this for several years after trying everything to control my GSDs itchy flaky skin, low weight/pickiness, and very sensitive stomach. It works well on all problems. Both of my dogs love it, and they have done very well on it - the GSD is getting close to 12, which is pretty good for that breed.

It is a bit expensive at first, buying all of the ingredients, but once you have all of them, it really isn’t much more than high quality kibbble. A recipe lasts for a week for the two dogs, and I just freeze the patties to keep it fresh. I do supplement with some high quality kibble to give some crunch.

Here is a link, or just search for Dr. Fox’s dog food recipe. https://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/pets/dr-fox/dr-fox-s-home-prepared-diet-for-dogs/article_f8c6f2d1-ba66-532b-a66e-9543a8e0ca96.html

 
thomas rubino
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Thanks Artie;  
I think I will have to harvest 2 elk and 2 deer and start raising chickens to keep the moose fed with that diet!  
Not that I would mind... we like elk burger and deer steaks as well!
They say Mastiff have stomach issues (burping , farting)  I may find myself trying Dr Fox's  recipe as she grows up.

Just took some photos and measurements on the moose.
As of today she is 21 weeks old (5 months 1 week)
She weighs in at #60
She stands 22" at the shoulder ! OMG  
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Molly filling up the living room floor
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whatcha doin dad ???
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One fine looking doggy !
 
Artie Scott
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Good point!  You will be in the kitchen every day whipping up a batch for that beast!  But yeah, to the extent you have wild elk and deer resources, the cost goes down real fast!
 
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Hi Thomas,

Always had great danes and learned alot about feeding them as puppies and adults. Do not give them any puppy chow/puppy food. They grow so quickly and the puppy foods have too much protein, this causes already rapid growth and leads to problems as adults. I always used a good adult dog food with minimal protein, especially for large breed. Another thing I learned the hard way, don't spay/neuter until at least a yr old. This gives the hormones time to do their job in a healthy fashion. Doing this too early, and you usually wind up with a much larger dog.
Beautiful dog!
Teri
 
thomas rubino
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An Apple for you Teri!
Great advice! Thank You!  I will follow both suggestions!
 
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We feed our Large guard dogs Diamond Adult dog, this comes in lamb&rice, chicken&rice and beef&rice, all have probiotics and are our vet's choice.

We never feed puppy food to any of our dogs (the small ones are 65 lbs. the large ones are 112+ Catahoula Leopard dogs), as has been said, large dogs grow fast enough with out any help from a high protein food.

Redhawk
 
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We've had a lot. Currently have 4 LGD's but have also had a St Bernard. All big puppies. Second what everyone else said and about not neutering early. We always waited till age 2, but we have all boys so there was little pregnancy risk around these parts.

We give fish oil and joint supplements pretty early.


It's also important to keep them skinnier. A fat large breed dog is going to die an earlier death.
 
thomas rubino
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Molly has a new trick!  Our home is a 90 year old cabin ,100% off grid.
For some reason, most people that come to our door, don't seem to use or even notice the white plastic door bell button... Its rite there in plain sight... But no ,it couldn't be a doorbell , there's no electricity here right ???  

Now Molly on the other hand. Has decided that putting her paws up and looking thru the front door window is the thing to do when she wants back in ...
Seems she is just the rite height to push the doorbell button.

Now imagine, it's 3 AM. You've gotten out of bed to let Molly out to avoid accidents.  Your sitting in the dark quietly reading a book by book light when suddenly DING DONG/ DING DONG/DING DONG
After you have pried yourself off the ceiling, assured your spouse that all is OK and nobody is at the door... meanwhile ... DING DONG/DING DONG You run to let Molly in. The whole time feeling very self conscious dashing to open the front door in your birthday suit... That dark 6' tall shape looking in , MUST be Molly .... Right ?
She has done this half a dozen times so far!  
My only hope is as she grows her paws will hit higher on the door frame, missing the door bell!

Our house full of Persian cats have a new game as well.
Molly is the unwitting participant.
She is a very happy dog, always wagging her tail.
The kittys attack her tail ... batting, biting , really going for it!
Molly is oblivious, has no clue, continues to happily wag her tail. Much to the kittys enjoyment!

Adult large breed food is on the way. We will wean her away from the puppy chow as soon as possible.
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Molly & some of her cat friends...
 
Drew Moffatt
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May have been mentioned already but when changing feeds don't change instantly.
Try to introduce the new feed over a few days otherwise it can be hard on their tummies.
 
Chris Kott
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That's hilarious, Thomas! I nearly busted a gut!

Perhaps next time, you shouldn't keep a lady waiting, on the porch at 3 A.M.

-CK
 
thomas rubino
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Everything must be Molly proofed!
She is teething and all is subject to gnawing ! Slippers,  shoes , dirty clothes hamper, body parts .... The list is endless.
I used a baby gate to keep her from the book case, I'll have to add another level soon , she can get things off of the printer if she wants them bad enough.
Net sacks hold slippers in the day and socks at night. No unsupervised visits in the kitchen.

Every day she is a little taller  ... 24" at the shoulder now.  She reaches new things that she couldn't see last week! And pulls them down and carries them off ... ARRRR  just like a two year old !!! I can just hear her going MINE MINE MINE as she trots off.

Molly and Liz have been attending doggy boot camp for the last three Saturdays, next week is their finally week.
So cool watching her learn...  she is so smart, Molly is learning as well :)
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Warm slippers over the wood stove
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Have to put a second level on soon
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Cats allowed unsupervised in the kitchen , dog is not
 
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My vote is and will always be raw meat, whole prey if you can manage.  Rabbits are AWESOME dog food.  Poultry works too.  And roadkill when you're in a pinch, if it's legal in your state!

Our Anatolian is 13 months old and somewhere over 100lbs.  She'll likely top out over 120-150, I have very little doubt.  Her mother was only 60lbs!  Her dad was 80lbs at 3 years old!  I had low expectations for her size.  In my mind, the difference has been made by feeding her 100% raw meat.  Lots of fat, bones, cartilage, skin, organs, innards- all the good greasy minerals and nutrients a big dog needs is right there in its natural state.  

Our dogs are robust, clean, soft, smell fresh and clean, have no eye goobers, no icky ears,, have no itching or skin problems, are not overweight, and have no health complaints to speak of.  My 10 y/o shepherd has pearly white teeth, fresh breath, and is spry and playful as a pup.

And no, feeding them raw meat doesn't make em mean.  They share carcasses and meals quite peacefully amongst themselves and will take a tidbit of meat from your fingers as daintily as you please.  They're 120% trustworthy with all of the livestock- even the rabbits they eat.  That's about conditioning and training, of course.  But feeding a dog a chicken doesn't mean it becomes a chicken killer, as I often hear strangely repeated.  Maybe it will if you LET it...  Anyway, I digress.

Raw meat!  Nature's best food for our four legged carnivorous friends!
 
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