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Homemade Wood-Stove From Propane Tank & Car Wheel

 
Posts: 610
Location: ontario, canada
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transportation fungi tiny house
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i love junk, upcycling, creating, and fire!  I'm sure I'm not alone.  I've seen some homemade tent stoves made from ammo cans, store bought mini house wood stoves which are costly, barrel stoves which are nice in the eye of a recycle'r upcycle'r creator, but very thin material which can easily burn-out.  i have access to many old date expired free propane tanks, car wheels, and various scrap metals so i thought i'd try to build something more simple than a rocket stove, compact and take up minimal floor space (tiny living, space saving,...), and do it by spending very little, and practice welding and fabricating along the way.  

my first outcome was simple.  safely evacuate and purge the gas, add a door opening and exhaust stack.  KISS keep it simple, silly!  i ended up using a 5" diesel truck exhaust pipe!  i've seen tiny home stoves and pellet stoves with 4" exhaust, i've made rockets and wood stoves with 6", so this 5" heavy duty pipe should be a great piece to use.  the heavy exhaust pipe will extend a few feet from the body of the stove, as a part of the stove.  this strong heat rated exhaust pipe can handle the heat if any flames travel up into the exhaust, which i'm sure is possibly inevitable which a small stove.  

i'm using a 40 lb LP tank as i thing a common 20lb bbq tank is a bit too compact.  this 40 lb tank has more radiant surface area but takes you the same 12" diameter , only 1 sq ft of floor space required either way, but this way allows more capacity, more radiant surface area, and more room for exhaust to funnel, and ash to build or clean.  

here is my first simple setup, i started this last winter as a free-time boredom welding project, later on i make some modifications to a few things.  the cook-top was something i wanted to change for the better.  i always liked clean burning fires and lots of oxygen, never intended on building an "airtight" model but i do have a couple new wood-stove rope seal door gaskets waiting, in 2 different sizes.  

stage 1, safely convert the LP tank into an upright wood-stove.  i consider it to be a vertical barrel stove, vertical for less floor space requirements.
 
John McDoodle
Posts: 610
Location: ontario, canada
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Compact upright barrel stove STAGE 2 !  A better Cook top / stove top:

 In case of emergency, i really wanted to get a cook-top directly on-top of the fire.  i had a "floating" cast iron plate that served as a warming plate or place to dry wet gloves but i wanted the option to boil water or cook meat without taking a century.  a real hot cook top  / stove top was the next step to make things better.  This little homemade pile of metal would be great in a small home or small workshop, cabin or camping, but here in Canada we get ice storms and snow storms through winter that can knock out power for days, and we also get crippling cold.  if the power ever went out, this stove could be an off-grid emergency cook stove to cook a meal, a great space heater, she really does throw an abundance of heat with a small amount of wood, and it could also possibly heat water with a stack coil, or provide light with a glass door, or charge a cellphone with a thermal-electric generator panel.  

for stage 2 i focus mainly on the cook top, which requires some chimney exhaust stack modification and relocation.  i should have considered this from the start, but hey you learn from hands on, and you learn from your mistakes.  this project wasn't drawn out in pre-planning, but rather salvage what i can find, before i decide on design.  this is important with free and recycled upcycle type builds, unless you already have your materials

stage 2 : make things more awesome than before
 
John McDoodle
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I've been working on a better door latch and today I installed a woodstove fiberglass rope door seal. I think this was my first time using a door seal on one of my homemade stoves.  
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Air intake, door seal. Progress
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A closer look at intake and exhaust baffle
 
John McDoodle
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Location: ontario, canada
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a little video update on this 40 lb propane tank wood stove :)

 
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